Stephen Wilkes: Time Machine — zPhotoJournal

Stephen Wilkes: Time Machine

I see a lot out there and what I see is people who have talent and work hard…or think they work hard…but the priority they need to get to that special place is going to escape them. They don’t understand that the level of passion and drive that you have to have to be really successful in this business today is amplified. Everybody has a camera and it’s incredible who you’re competing with. So my advice is something Jay Maisel once told me, “You gotta eat, sleep, breathe and drink it. And if you don’t do that, find something else to do!” 

The Last Sentimentalist: a Q. & A. with Duane Michals

Link: The Last Sentimentalist: a Q. & A. with Duane Michals | The New Yorker

The photographer Duane Michals is perhaps best known for his “fictionettes”: dream-like stagings in which Marcel Duchamp, René Magritte, and Andy Warhol have all appeared. These enchanting photo sequences and montages, which are often accompanied by Michals’s handwritten prose, make innovative use of the medium’s ability to suggest what cannot be seen

Christine Osinski: Shoppers, Chicago, and Swimmers 1980-1996

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Link: Christine Osinski: Shoppers, Chicago, and Swimmers 1980-1996 | LENSCRATCH

I believe that good work will eventually find a place in the world, regardless of how long it takes to find its way. It’s most important for photographers to continue to take pictures, regardless of the attention or lack of attention that the work initially receives. I get great pleasure from being a working artist, day in and day out. By continuing to work consistently, I feel I will be ready should opportunity knock.

Q&A: Robert Nickelsberg on a Distant War

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Link: Q&A: Robert Nickelsberg on a Distant War | PROOF

In his new book, Afghanistan: A Distant War, veteran photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg offers a vivid close-up of the past quarter-century of Afghan history. As a photographer for Time Magazine, Nickelsberg first observed Afghanistan emerge from an eight-year war against the Soviet Union and then descend into a brutal civil war followed by a Taliban takeover. Since 2001, he’s continued going back to chronicle what he calls America’s War. He has documented things many Afghans themselves never experienced firsthand, and earned an unusually deep understanding of this complex country.