Christine Osinski: Shoppers, Chicago, and Swimmers 1980-1996

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Link: Christine Osinski: Shoppers, Chicago, and Swimmers 1980-1996 | LENSCRATCH

I believe that good work will eventually find a place in the world, regardless of how long it takes to find its way. It’s most important for photographers to continue to take pictures, regardless of the attention or lack of attention that the work initially receives. I get great pleasure from being a working artist, day in and day out. By continuing to work consistently, I feel I will be ready should opportunity knock.

Q&A: Robert Nickelsberg on a Distant War

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Link: Q&A: Robert Nickelsberg on a Distant War | PROOF

In his new book, Afghanistan: A Distant War, veteran photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg offers a vivid close-up of the past quarter-century of Afghan history. As a photographer for Time Magazine, Nickelsberg first observed Afghanistan emerge from an eight-year war against the Soviet Union and then descend into a brutal civil war followed by a Taliban takeover. Since 2001, he’s continued going back to chronicle what he calls America’s War. He has documented things many Afghans themselves never experienced firsthand, and earned an unusually deep understanding of this complex country.

Dominic Nahr Is a Master of Photographing Human Eeriness

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Link: Dominic Nahr Is a Master of Photographing Human Eeriness | VICE United Kingdom

For this round of VICE Loves Magnum we spoke to Dominic Nahr, who – unlike previous interviewees – is still running the gauntlet of selection before becoming a full Magnum member. We discussed Africa’s endless potential for stories, the eeriness of post-tsunami Japan and how a feeling of homelessness can be conducive to taking amazing photos.

Bruce Gilden Takes Street Photos Like You’ve Never Seen Before

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Link: Bruce Gilden Takes Street Photos Like You’ve Never Seen Before | VICE United Kingdom

I wouldn’t call it challenging, but a little annoying. In Paris, you’ll always have one person who comes over and gives you the, “Why’d you take the picture, why’d you take the picture?” Sometimes we’ve had cops come over. And this isn’t going to a war  or working where people are doing heroin on the streets – which I’ve already seen – or dealing with lowlifes, I’m just talking about ordinary people here. Parisians tend to be a little “intellectual” and it becomes a whole exercise for them, so it gets me a little flustered. What I mean by “flustered” is that I don’t have much respect for it. I just say, “Okay, get a cop.” I’m not going to get into a whole dialogue because, for me, I don’t agree with their premise. I do agree that you could ask me why I took a photo, but it depends how you ask me. You don’t treat me as a piece of shit; I’m not going to take it. You have to have a tough skin to be a street photographer.