The Real Story About the Wrong Photos in #BringBackOurGirls

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Link: The Real Story About the Wrong Photos in #BringBackOurGirls

A Twitter campaign using the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls has focused global attention on the plight of some 276 Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by the Islamic militant group Boko Haram. Three photos of girls have been posted and reposted thousands of times, including by the BBC and by the singer Chris Brown (who himself has had issues with anger management and violence against women).

One problem: The photos are of girls from Guinea-Bissau, more than 1,000 miles from Nigeria, who have no relationship to the kidnappings.

Photography and The Death of Reality

Link: Photography and The Death of Reality

I’d like to share a story about Ansel Adams, relayed to me by one of his assistants, the talented John Sexton. Here goes: A man writes Ansel Adams a letter (condensed here): Dear Mr. Adams, I have your books. Your beautiful pictures of Yosemite inspired me to visit this National Park. However, when I got there I was disappointed. The park does not look like that.

The Dysfunctional Guitar: More on the Reuters Syria Photo Controversy

Link: The Dysfunctional Guitar: More on the Reuters Syria Photo Controversy — BagNews

what we have here is more of a teaching moment. Talking with many colleagues this week, I know I’m not the only one who is frustrated with Reuters. Given blanket denials and the refusal to address specifics information already published about the munitions story, it does a disservice to all the earnest professionals in the business, especially those working for the photo agency

Reading the Pictures: Were Reuters “Boy in a Syrian Bomb Factory” Photos Staged?

Link: Reading the Pictures: Were Reuters “Boy in a Syrian Bomb Factory” Photos Staged? — BagNews

We hope this this post might contribute to a thoughtful, open and persistent examination — among concerned citizens, the photo community and among photo- and news media – about the truth behind this story, as well as the issues surrounding how stories in conflict zones can be visually procured today. Below, we’ve paired photos from the story with either direct quotes or paraphrased comments from the reactions we received: