In New York, Photography Takes to the Street – LightBox

In New York, Photography Takes to the Street

It’s a typical Thursday night in New York when, on the corner of 10th Avenue and 13th Street, a white Cadillac and a blue Mini Cooper pull over. Five photographers emerge from the cars, carrying paint rollers and pots of wheat-based glue. As three of them quickly and expertly apply glue to a four-by-three-foot section of virgin brick wall across from the Standard Hotel, the other two carefully roll out and paste large sections of a black-and-white photograph.

What You Need To Know Your First Year as a Freelance Photographer | PhotoShelter Blog

What You Need To Know Your First Year as a Freelance Photographer

Fresh out of college, Kyle Johnson thought he’d wanted a career in what he’d majored in: video editing. But after a year in a corporate editing job, the Seattleite became bored and quit to work at a coffee shop. He started shooting pictures of friends’ bands on the side, and realized photography was a better fit for him. In 2010, he’d found enough local photography work to quit the coffee shop job and focus on a freelance career

William Mortensen: photographic master at the monster’s ball | Art and design | The Guardian

William Mortensen: photographic master at the monster’s ball

Ansel Adams called him ‘the antichrist’ and wanted him written out of history. But William Mortensen’s grotesque photographs of death, nudity and torture and are now having their day. Chris Campion pays tribute to a master of the macabre

via Ansel Adams called photographer William Mortensen “the Antichrist” – Boing Boing

How the Past Shapes Modern Photography – LightBox

How the Past Shapes Modern Photography

TIME LightBox’s curators series invites top photography curators from around the world to present and discuss photography of their choosing in an effort to learn more about their curatorial preferences and the path from individual images to full-fledged exhibitions. This month, TIME invited Deborah Willis, Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts to discuss how the past both shapes and influences modern photography.