Modern Day Explorer Documents the World’s ‘Micronations’ – Feature Shoot

Modern Day Explorer Documents the World’s ‘Micronations’

Drawn to small places with improbable histories, photographer Léo Delafontaine could be described as a modern day explorer. Upon the discovery of the Principality of Sealand, a military platform situated on international waters ruled by a constitutional monarchy, he knew this would be the start of a new documentary project. After some research he realized these independent entities, or Micronations, as the series is titled, are not an isolated phenomenon and many other similar nations exist throughout the world

Origins of “The Derek Tape,” ’90s viral phone call recording between record store clerk and hesher – Boing Boing

Origins of “The Derek Tape,” ’90s viral phone call recording between record store clerk and hesher

Derek does most of the talking (there’s a good reason it’s not called “The Kurt Tape”), much of which concerns Derek’s reasons for wanting to put his neighbor, Terry, in the hospital, and his intention to do just that. Once the conversation turns to metal lore, though, and Derek’s enthusiasm kicks into high gear, it is hard not to get carried away with him as he talks about the important things in life

Envisioning Human Rights Part III Stephen Ferry, Ken Light, Stephen Goldblatt, Sebastião Salgado – The Eye of Photography

Envisioning Human Rights Part III Stephen Ferry, Ken Light, Stephen Goldblatt, Sebastião Salgado

We’ve become such a 24/7 moving world with a constant stream of news and sound and pictures,” writes Light. “And the wonderful thing of a still photograph is you get to linger, you get to stop, you get to look, you get to think, you get to react, and it is a very different experience.

Envisioning Human Rights Part I Gilles Peress, Thomas Morley, Jean-Marie Simon – The Eye of Photography

Envisioning Human Rights Part I Gilles Peress, Thomas Morley, Jean-Marie Simon

Gilles Peress raises the dilemma of human rights photography:

“I keep asking myself the fundamental question: Can human rights photography, like 18th century novels, be a vehicle for empathy? Can photographs motivate viewers to engage with human rights issues and bring about real change? As we know, badly used photography can be a vehicle for propaganda or emotional exploitation of the worst kind, and can ultimately desensitize viewers. Alternatively, if we accept the postmodernist argument mentioned above, we run the risk of photographs not being taken and entering a black hole of not seeing and a complete absence of consciousness. Which do you choose?”

See the First Major Retrospective of Paul Strand’s Work in 50 Years – LightBox

See the First Major Retrospective of Paul Strand’s Work in 50 Years

Now, the first major retrospective of his work in almost 50 years, running at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the home of over 4,000 of his prints, presents him as not only a critical figure in the history of modern art, but seeks to affirm his place as one of the founders of photography as we know it today.