PhotoNOLA: Elise Kirk: Groundswell - LENSCRATCH

This week we are sharing some of our discoveries from the PhotoNOLA Reviews, an annual celebration of photography in New Orleans. In Elise Kirk’s series, Groundswell, we are invited to the landscape of the Midwestern United States—a location bound to the

In Elise Kirk’s series, Groundswell, we are invited to the landscape of the Midwestern United States—a location bound to the flux and flow of the Missouri River. Her photographs depict a force of nature and its changing relationship with the area’s inhabitants. Among other things, I was fascinated by this work because of its portrayal of mutual vulnerability. The river represents an ecosystem susceptible to damage. And while it acts as a provider to local communities and economies, it also threatens to destroy. Though Elise’s work is regionally specific, it speaks to broader themes relating to our connection to the environment and the importance of serving as its caretaker.

Photojournalist Lynsey Addario Captures the Unfolding War in Ukraine

The situation on the ground from the perspective of a photojournalist.

Award-winning American photojournalist Lynsey Addario has been on assignment in Ukraine for the New York Times documenting the war as it unfolds, from the tragic loss of human life and homes to the poignant bravery of Ukrainians.

PHOTO NOLA: Cathy Cone: Rewinding Forward - LENSCRATCH

This week we are sharing some of our discoveries from the PHOTO NOLA Reviews, an annual celebration of photography in New Orleans.  “I make photographs as a way to listen to my heart’s song, and then I practice like hell to sing it.” Cathy Cone Cathy Cone

Cathy Cone is a photographer and painter based in East Topsham, Vermont. Her series Rewinding Forward is an ongoing life project, representing events and personal experiences in a continuum. There’s a whimsical quality to this work, reminiscent to the photographs in her former series Hand Painted Photographs. Yet Rewinding Forward infuses a sense of foreboding, creating visual poems that contemplate the mystery and intrigue of simply being alive. An interview with the artist follows.

Afro Atlantico | By Alex Almeida

Afro Atlantico | By Alex Almeida The “AFRO ATLANTICO” series was devised from my experience in the peripheral cultures of big Brazilian cities as well as the plunge into the depths of t…

The “AFRO ATLANTICO” series was devised from my experience in the peripheral cultures of big Brazilian cities as well as the plunge into the depths of the Amazon rainforest, mostly renowned for its wildlife and vegetation, however equally vast in its human mosaic.

Heirs of the Dawn | By María Daniel Balcázar

‘Heirs of the Dawn’ by María Daniel Balcázar Purchase ‘Heirs of the Dawn’ book HERE! The ancient inhabitants of Oruro, Bolivia, named their land uru-uru, meaning the place w…

The ancient inhabitants of Oruro, Bolivia, named their land uru-uru, meaning the place where the light is born. They called themselves “beings of the dawn”. Their legacy is woven into the work of artisans, who through their art, revive the soul of the Andean and European deities and the memory of the African slaves.

Joe McNally Dishes "The Real Deal" - PhotoShelter Blog

Nearly twenty years ago, I came across Joe McNally’s photo of a Northrop Grumman X-47A Pegasus that he took for a National Geographic story entitled “The Future of Flying Faster Farther Smarter.” The piece was notable for being the magazine’s first to fea

“The Real Deal: Field Notes from the Life of a Working Photographer” (Rocky Nook) is part memoir, part business advice, and part technical notes. If you’ve ever contemplated a life in photography – especially as a freelancer – this is a must read (and the photos aren’t so bad either!). Joe’s writing is crisp and entertaining, and it’s a surprisingly quick read even at 378 pages.

Steve Schapiro, Photojournalist Who Bore Witness, Dies at 87

He documented the civil rights movement and subjects as diverse as narcotics users, migrant workers and movie stars, seeking to capture their emotional heart.

Steve Schapiro, a photojournalist and social documentarian who bore witness to some of the nation’s most significant political and cultural moments and movements, starting in the 1960s with the historic struggle for racial equality across the Jim Crow South, died on Jan. 15 at his home in Chicago. He was 87.