Love's Labors: Osamu James Nakagawa: Kai: Following the Cycle of Life - LENSCRATCH

Love’s Labors: Labor is often described as being of the body, and economists have spent centuries calculating formulas to explain its value.  But there is a lacuna in all of these calculations, the invisible and the ephemeral—love. How do we calculate the

Osamu James Nakagawa transforms image making into a ritual, participating in the cyclical experience of life and death. He becomes a bridge between generations, using a visual language to reunite his ancestors with his daughter. In this way, he outlines the meaning of his own life while acknowledging its passing—he is never more than a shadow while his family is rendered in careful hues, lines, and shapes. Kai I and II is an ongoing series that began at the intersection of his father’s death and daughter’s birth. Eventually, he photographed the death of his mother as well. Dying is not easy. Nor is growing up or growing old. As his mother lay dying, he photographed her last breath—the exchange was a gift: her last labor and his love.

Jacob Ehrbahn: On the Roads of Exile

Jacob Ehrbahn spent five years traveling the roads of exile. From 2015 to 2020, the photographer followed migrants who came to Europe in search of the European dream. A combination of hope, misery and disillusion, the book A Dream of Europe is a powerful

The images that tell the true story of the war in Afghanistan

Images from Afghanistan have always revealed the truth behind the notion that the American war was on solid footing. We may have been told, since it first began shortly after September 11, 2001, that significant progress was just around the bend. But t

IMAGES FROM AFGHANISTAN HAVE ALWAYS REVEALED THE TRUTH behind the notion that the American war was on solid footing. We may have been told, since it first began shortly after September 11, 2001, that significant progress was just around the bend. But the pictures showed something else.

Jared Ragland: What Has Been Will Be Again - LENSCRATCH

Projects featured this week were selected from our most recent call-for-submissions. I was able to interview each of these artists to gain further insight into the bodies of work they shared. Today, we are looking at the series What Has Been Will Be Again

Jared Ragland is a fine art and documentary photographer and former White House photo editor. His collaborative, socially-conscious art practice critically explores the identity and history of place through social science, literary, and historical research methodologies.

What Gilles Peress Saw on 9/11

The Magnum photographer looks back on capturing an “inconceivable event.”

A cop tried to stop me. He said, ‘You’re crazy, you’re going to die,’ and I said, ‘O.K.,’ and I bypassed him. I arrived as the second tower was falling. There were very few people there.” The only people he recalled seeing at first “were a group of about six firemen, who were trying to do the impossible.”

A Woman Journalist at Ground Zero

On September 11, 2001, photographer Gulnara Samoilova was in downtown Manhattan when the World Trade Center terrorist attacks happened. Her images were awarded with a World Press Photo in 2002 and published in a book, Women Journalists at Ground Zero.

Anonymous Photographer Wins Prestigious Photojournalism Award

He chose to remain anonymous as a protective measure.

This year, the top award for the News category was awarded to a photographer in Myanmar who wanted to remain anonymous for security reasons. Mikko Takkunen, the Asia photo editor for The New York Times, collected the award on his behalf.
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5 Benefits of Photography Mentorship - PhotoShelter Blog

Even though there are tons of us out there, being a photographer can, at times, be quite lonely.  In an industry where so many of us are in direct competition, it’s hard to step back and remember that we’re all in this together. We’re all working to share

In an industry where so many of us are in direct competition, it’s hard to step back and remember that we’re all in this together. We’re all working to share important stories and offer glimpses of powerful emotion without saying a word. We all struggle, but it’s important to remember that together we can all improve and propel the industry forward. At PhotoShelter, we believe everyone can benefit from a mentor or mentee. Don’t just take our word for it though. Below, hear about how two photographers, Miriam Alarcón Avila and Daniella Zalcman, connected and learn more about how mentorship can help you.

WATCH: Why Luck is a State of Mind with Deanne Fitzmaurice - PhotoShelter Blog

“I find that showing up and expecting that the universe will deliver, actually paves the way for it to do so. You need patience because often it takes time.” Deanne Fitzmaurice For Deanne Fitzmaurice, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, Think Tank Photo

We sat down with Deanne to walk through a wide range of personal and freelance projects to outline what makes a memorable photograph and how to use the art of storytelling to make an impact. With the right mindset, anyone can leave their mark.