That New Dork Smell

From Juxtapoz:

Opening night photos from the Art Dorks group show at Toyroom Gallery in Sacramento, CA.

Photos by Mildred

Opening Reception April 14, 2006 – 7pm-Late
Runs thru May 13th, 2006

The Art Dorks… Shawn Barber, Mike Burnett, David Chung, Brendan Danielsson, Mark Elliot, Jad Fair, Robert Hardgrave, Gregory Jacobsen, Travis Louie, Chris Mostyn, Jason Murphy, Jeremy Pruitt, Katie Ridley, Meagan Ridley, Chris Ryniak, Kim Scott, and Johnny Yanok

Here.

Gang War Panics Mall

From the Cape Argus:

Shoppers ran for their lives when bloody warfare between two rival Cape Flats gangs spilled over into a crowded Wynberg shopping mall.

The confrontation, between members of rival Hanover Park gangs the Ghetto Kids and the Americans, began outside the magistrate’s court where a gang leader was appearing yesterday.

It then spilled into the streets and the busy Maynard Mall.

Three men were stabbed.

Here.

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Categorized as News

Steal This Newspaper

From the New York Times:

“During the first week that the additional on-site racks were in service, 43 percent of the Star Tribunes removed from those racks were not paid for. For the second week the rate was 41 percent. This is called ‘pilferage’ in our business; but put more plainly, it is theft, pure and simple.”

Mr. Alexander proceeded apace: “Taking more than one newspaper from a rack when you have only inserted enough money for one paper is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Employees who steal newspapers will put their jobs at risk. There is zero tolerance when it comes to stealing from our company, even if it is a 25-cent newspaper.”

When the memo landed on Romenesko, the journalism site, the company, rather than realizing that it had stepped in something unwholesome, began telling employees that the leaker would be found out and dealt with. The sideshow left some employees embarrassed and wondering why a debate over free personal copies of the paper was obscuring the fact that the public was buying the newspaper — and almost any newspaper — less frequently.

Here.

Photography Pulitzer Prize Winners

From PDN:

In a year when journalism from Hurricane Katrina dominated the Pulitzer Prizes, the staff of The Dallas Morning News won the 2006 Pulitzer for breaking news photography for coverage of the hurricane. It is the second time in three years The Dallas Morning News has claimed the breaking news photography prize.

Todd Heisler of the (Denver) Rocky Mountain News won the feature photography Pulitzer Prize for the “Final Salute” project. It is Heisler’s second Pulitzer. In 2003, he was part of the Rocky Mountain News team that won the breaking news photography prize for coverage of wildfires.

Here.

Bringing it all back home

From the New York Times:

A practiced escape artist, Charles Taylor knows he is better off in Europe than in Sierra Leone, where thousands of people would happily administer vigilante justice. Any escape from the protection of the United Nations detention center in Freetown would be a death sentence.
Here.

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The Armenian Genocide

From the New York Times:

The documentary honors the victims of the Armenian genocide and also pays tribute to dissidents in Turkey who are brave enough to speak out despite government censorship. And that makes it all the odder that so many public television stations here censored the follow-up program as soon as a few lobby groups complained.

Here.

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'Gotcha' Master Tastes His Own Medicine

From the New York Times:

But Mazher Mahmood, a reporter whose modus operandi is to dress up as a wealthy Arab businessman and secretly record conversations with his unwitting victims, recently met his match in George Galloway, a member of the British Parliament and frequent critic of Israel and the United States.

Here.

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Black and White

Photo Gallery from Jason M. Olson Photography:

another gallery. this time the demolition derby in duchesne. part of the glory days of utah six. you know, back when it existed.
Here.

Giant Mao statue erected in Tibet

From the BBC:

“Many Tibetan people suggested we should have a statue of Chairman Mao to show our gratitude,” a local Communist Party official told Xinhua:

Here.

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Why the Secrecy? Only the Bureaucrats Know

From the New York Times:

Why do bureaucrats insist on spending the taxpayers’ money to keep aging government paperwork from the taxpayers?

The question has arisen anew because of the discovery that military and intelligence agencies have pulled some 55,000 pages of decades-old documents from public access at the National Archives. Some documents were photocopied long ago by researchers. In the case of the redacted 1946 memorandum, the State Department had already published it in the multivolume history “Foreign Relations of the United States.”

Here.

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A General Misunderstanding

Machael DeLong, from the New York Times:

This is why the much-repeated claims that Mr. Rumsfeld didn’t “give us enough troops” in Iraq ring hollow. First, such criticisms ignore that the agreed-upon plan was for a lightning operation into Baghdad. In addition, logistically it would have been well nigh impossible to bring many more soldiers through the bottleneck in Kuwait. And doing so would have carried its own risk: you cannot sustain a fighting force of 300,000 or 500,000 men for long, and it would have left us with few reserves, putting our troops at risk in other parts of the world. Given our plan, we thought we had the right number of troops to accomplish our mission.

The outcome and ramifications of a war, however, are impossible to predict. Saddam Hussein had twice opened his jails, flooding the streets with criminals. The Iraqi police walked out of their uniforms in the face of the invasion, compounding domestic chaos. We did not expect these developments.

Here.

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AFI release their first single online, "Miss Murder"

Love it or hate it, from Punknews:

The first single from AFI’s upcoming full length has been posted on the band’s official website. The track comes from the band’s long-awaited (and delayed) sophomore album, Decemberunderground.

The album is expected to contain both “hardcore moments” and more electronc leanings as well as feature backing vocals from Tiger Army’s Nick 13, Dan Smith from Day of Contempt, Bleeding Through’s Brandon Schieppati, Eighteen Visions’ Keith Barney, and Ronan Harris from VNV Nation, among others.

Here.

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Categorized as Music

In Iraqi Divide, Echoes of Bosnia for U.S. Troops

From the New York Times:

“You talk to people here and it’s literally the same conversations I heard in Bosnia,” Colonel Donahoe said. “I had a police colonel tell me the other day that all the people in Jurf,” a predominantly Sunni town, “are evil, including the children.”

Here.

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Generals Break With Tradition Over Rumsfeld

From the New York Times:

Yet Mr. Kohn said he found the chorus of attacks disquieting. He was disturbed, he said, by an assertion made by Lt. Gen. Gregory Newbold, who retired from the Marines, in an essay for Time magazine, that he was writing “with the encouragement of some still in positions of military leadership.”

“That’s a fairly chilling thought,” Mr. Kohn said. “Chilling because they’re not supposed to be undermining their civilian leadership.”

“It’s not the military that holds the civilian leadership accountable,” he said. “It’s Congress, the voters, investigative journalists. Things have been turned upside down here.”

Here.

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Khat Trade Rules in Somalia

From the Washington Post:

“If the country was ever normal, I’d quit and return to teaching,” said Ali, 40, who guards her stash with an AK-47 and has a gold tooth that she says makes her appear “tough.” “What else can I do to survive?”

Here.

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Staying Sharp: veteran news shooter seeks new challenges

From RobGalbraith:

“You have to set a goal for yourself every year,” Dresling says, explaining what that experience taught him. “I do it partly because it’s fun, but also to keep myself on my toes because if you let everything roll over you, you’ll be out of business in a short period of time.”

Here.

Eugene Richards joins VII photo agency

From Journal of a Photographer:

“The work of Eugene Richards is a cornerstone of contemporary documentary photography and filmmaking. All of us at VII welcome Eugene and look forward to his comradeship and creative spirit.”, says James Nachtwey, president of VII. “I am very pleased to be a part of this very creative group of people,” says Eugene Richards.
Here.

Opening night of Headache

From Juxtapoz:

Photos from the opening night of Headache, artwork by John Casey and Lucien Shapiro at Boontling Gallery in Oakland, CA.

Here.

Death, famine, drought: cost of 3C global rise in temperature

From the Guardian:

Global temperatures will rise by an average of 3C due to climate change and cause catastrophic damage around the world unless governments take urgent action, according to the UK government’s chief scientist.

In a stark warning issued yesterday Sir David King said that a rise of this magnitude would cause famine and drought and threaten millions of lives.

It would also cause a worldwide drop in cereal crops of between 20 and 400m tonnes, put 400 million more people at risk of hunger, and put up to 3 billion people at risk of flooding and without access to fresh water supplies.

Here.

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The Ruthless Truth

From The Moscow Times:

The war on the Eastern Front remains largely “undiscovered country” for the Western reader despite the fact that the Red Army was responsible for nearly 75 percent of German military losses, including soldiers killed in battle, wounded, taken prisoner and otherwise unaccounted for. The best guide to this terrain is Vasily Grossman, who spent over 1,000 days at the front as a combat correspondent for Krasnaya Zvezda, the Soviet Army newspaper. A decorated lieutenant colonel by the end of the war, he fell afoul of the Soviet authorities and died in 1964 a non-person, his works swept from library shelves and bookshops.

Here.

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