Polar Night | by Mark Mahaney

Polar Night | by Mark Mahaney  71.2906° N, 156.7886° W Utqiaġvik, Alaska Top of the world they call it. Don’t feel that way. Feels like the bottom. So dark there’s no end. So cold there’s no feel. …

Mark Mahaney’s Polar Night is a passage through a rapidly changing landscape in Alaska’s northernmost town of Utqiagvik. It’s an exploration of prolonged darkness, told through the strange beauty of a snowscape cast in a two month shadow. The unnatural lights that flare in the sun’s absence and the shapes that emerge from the landscape are unexpectedly beautiful in their softness and harshness. It’s hard to see past the heavy gaze of climate change in an arctic town, though Polar Night is a visual poem about endurance, isolation and survival.

Interview: Ed Kashi – “Abandoned Moments” — Analog Forever Magazine

You must believe in yourself, believe in this work and be ready and willing to work harder than you’ve ever worked. You must be able to withstand a seemingly inhumane amount of disappointment and rejection, learn to navigate the unseemly politics and favoritism that is rife in most creative fields, and basically be incredibly resilient. And you must bring your ideas to the table. You must be insatiably curious, sensitive, aware of your surroundings, learn the customs and mores of the places you work, want to engage with people, dedicate yourself to issues, know how to write and express yourself, be gracious, humble, and bring an open heart and mind

Wee Muckers – Youth of Belfast | By Toby Binder

Wee Muckers – Youth of Belfast | Toby Binder »If I had been born at the top of my street, behind the corrugated-iron border, I would have been British. Incredible to think. My whole idea of myself,…

»If I had been born at the top of my street, behind the corrugated-iron border, I would have been British. Incredible to think. My whole idea of myself, the attachments made to a culture, heritage, religion, nationalism and politics are all an accident of birth. I was one street away from being born my ‘enemy’« writes Paul McVeigh, Belfast born novelist and author of ‘The Good Son’.

Magnum photographer defends images of teenage gang rape victim after humanitarian organisation removes them from website

After controversy on social media surrounding Newsha Tavakolian’s photographs of East Congo, Médecins Sans Frontières announces internal review

The celebrated Iranian photographer Newsha Tavakolian has defended herself against accusations of unethical practice after publishing a series of identifiable images of African teenage rape survivors made while on assignment for the international humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).

Juxtapoz Magazine - Stacy Kranitz: As It Was Give(n) To Me

For the past twelve years, Stacy Kranitz has been making photographs in the Appalachian region of the United States in order to explore how photograph...

As the narrative of As it Was Give(n) To Me unfolds, the book provides an intimate perspective on a region forced to transition away from coal extraction as its dominant source of economic stability, an opioid epidemic that has wreaked havoc on communities, and the role of Appalachia in a politically divided nation.

Paolo Pellegrin’s Photographic Quest for the Sublime

For as long as the celebrated photojournalist has been doing his best work, he has been grappling with the threat of blindness.

“To find silence, you need silence,” Pellegrin had observed, and as we drove in darkness no one spoke. An hour later, Anthony parked in the sand. Pellegrin handed me a flash and a tripod, and we set off on foot into the dunes. Here there was no sky; a thick fog obscured it. Individual particles cascaded in front of us, refracting light from the headlamps—tiny droplets, seen but not quite felt. Nearby was a brown hyena, sensed but not yet seen.

The Dennis Hopper Photograph That Caught Los Angeles

The actor stopped at an intersection, took out his Nikon, and made history.

“Double Standard” is probably the best known of the eighteen thousand images that Hopper created with his Nikon from 1961 to around the time he began shooting “Easy Rider,” in early 1968, which happens to be when his and Hayward’s combustible marriage finally blew up

The Making of War Photography — Blind Magazine

The Musée de l’Armée offers a first glimpse into its photographic archives in an exhibition that traces the representation of war and the evolution of images of combat from 1849 to the present. This essential event shares some important lessons.

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Categorized as War

What It's Like to Photograph the War in Ukraine

French war photographer Adrien Vautier spent over a month documenting the war unfolding in Ukraine.

One of the photojournalists working out of wartorn country was 51-year-old American journalist Brent Renaud. On the 13th of March, Renaud was killed in Irpin, a suburb north-west of Kyiv and one of the main battlefronts in the battle for Kyiv. Thanks to his and other journalists’ work, Irpin made headlines with images of civilians fleeing across the city’s main bridge.

Marcus Yam, Los Angeles Times foreign correspondent and photojournalist, wins Pulitzer

The 2022 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography goes to Marcus Yam, the sixth L.A. Times journalist to win a Pulitzer for photography categories.

Los Angeles Times foreign correspondent and photojournalist Marcus Yam was awarded the 2022 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography on Monday for his compelling coverage of the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban. It is remarkable that he won journalism’s highest honor in his first year as a foreign correspondent. This Pulitzer is the culmination of all the great work Yam has produced over the last seven years at the Los Angeles Times.

Getty Images Photojournalists Honored as Winners at the 2022 Pulitzer Prize | Getty Images Press Room | Latest company news, media announcements and information

Win McNamee, Drew Angerer, Spencer Platt, Samuel Corum and Jon Cherry have been named winners in the Breaking News Photography category for their extensive coverage documenting the January 6th attack of the U.S. Capitol.

The Costs of the Russian Onslaught in Ukraine

Destruction, brutality, and terrible loss in Bucha, Kharkiv, Irpin, and elsewhere.

The invasion of Ukraine has been described as the first social-media war, and a key aspect of President Volodymyr Zelensky’s leadership has been his ability to rally his country, and much of the world, via Facebook, Telegram, TikTok, and Twitter. At the same time, war photographers in Bucha, Irpin, and beyond are working—in the tradition of Mathew Brady at Antietam or Robert Capa on Omaha Beach—to capture the grisly realities of what Vladimir Putin insists that his people call a “special military operation.”