Watching the resistance

In western Canada, land defenders keep filming

As it is, newsrooms don’t necessarily prioritize sustained, nonviolent opposition in editorial decision-making. “The public eye wants violence and destruction, but turns away from our quiet resistance,” wrote Anne Spice, a Tlingit sociologist, and Denzel Sutherland-Wilson, a Gitxsan land defender, in the New Inquiry in 2019. “People are less interested in our governance systems operating as they should.”

Earth Day 2022: Inspiring Environmental Advocacy Through Photography - PhotoShelter Blog

For nearly two centuries, photography has played a role in educating the public about both the familiar and the unknown elements of our ever-changing environment — including the many species that live among us, the constant changes to our climate, and the

Photography can truly make an impact on conservation efforts and environmental advocacy. It’s one reason why every year for Earth Day, we ask our community of passionate PhotoShelter members to share their wildlife, nature and conservation photos. If not to inspire change, these photos can at least shine a light on the vast, breathtaking world around us.

Earth Week: Mandy Barker: Hong Kong Soup: 1826 - LENSCRATCH

This week we are featuring bodies of work are linked by this thematic lens:  making the often-invisible nature of the global climate and the ecological crisis more visible using conceptual, lens-based art techniques.  Each body of work speaks to a differe

Hong Kong Soup:1826’ is a series depicting waste plastic collected from over 30 different beaches in Hong Kong since 2012

Opinion | Photographing Hell

Some images will always have the power to make us confront horror.

This image of a man with both eyes open is one of the most compelling and disquieting photos to come out of Bucha. It’s an intimate and puzzling image of death, and I’ve never seen anything like it. What did this man see at the moment of his death? Whatever it was, his resolve remained.

Peter van Agtmael: “I Try to Criticize Myself and Criticize the Country at the Same Time” — Blind Magazine

Opening April 14 at the Bronx Documentary Center in New York, Look At The USA gathers photographs from 17 years of photographer Peter van Agtmael’s work to draw a complex picture of post 9/11 America.

Essentially, what I thought I knew about the country was soon being dismantled by what I was seeing with my own eyes. It was the feeling that something was wrong about how I perceived the United States and its place in the world, in its history and its own present. Dozens of questions turned into hundreds. They don’t necessarily get answered fully in the work, which is anyway open ended, but at least they get explored.

Young European Photographers, Episode 1: Michalina (Poland) — Blind Magazine

In this first episode of Young European Photographers, we visit Polish photographer Michalina Kuczyńska, who documents the social tensions and protests her country has experienced since the far right came to power.

Michalina Kuczyńska is the youngest member of the Archive of Public Protests (APP), a collective of eighteen photographers created in 2019 by Rafał Milach, who has collected images of Polish protests since 2015, that is, since the conservative national party Law and Justice (PiS) came to power.

Letizia Battaglia, photojournalist who documented mafia crimes, dies aged 87

Anti-mafia journalist from Palermo scoured Sicilian alleyways in 1970s and 1980s to expose brutal violence

Armed only with her Leica camera and mounted on a Vespa, Battaglia scoured the alleyways of Palermo during the 1970s and 1980s photographing the victims of mafia murders and the internal wars between rival clans. As a result she received several death threats.

Ten Years with the FARC — Blind Magazine

The Colombian photographer Federico Rios Escobar spent a decade in the Colombian jungle with the FARC.

In his book Verde, published by Raya Editorial, Federico Rios Escobar chronologically lays out his images from his life in the jungle: “I have lost track of the number of times I hung my hammock and took it down. It was my home in the jungle for many years, whether it was cold or hot, rain or shine. I was in it when sick, and it was my refuge in moments of anxiety. Some nights, I looked toward the sky with desperation and fear. Other nights I fell asleep confident in the hope of peace.” Federico followed the guerrillas on their journeys, through moments of tension and joy; he photographed families, budding loves, mothers, and their children. He documented the daily life of these women (40% of FARC fighters were women) and men who, round the clock, lived on high alert. In particular, he took portraits of the four guerrilla fighters who survived from the creation of the movement.

Doris Derby, Civil Rights Era Photographer, Dies at 82

She was an artist who was studying anthropology when she became an activist in the civil rights movement and a rare woman to document Black life in photos.

“I had a quest to show what the average person was doing,” she told the Southern Oral History Program in 2011, part of a collaboration with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture. “I had a quest to show our culture in total, not just a little bit, or negative stereotypes.”

A Muntagna | Emanuele Occhipinti

A Muntagna | Emanuele Occhipinti Mount Etna and the surrounding area is an island within an island. It’s the highest active volcano in Europe, a majestic presence that touches all of Sicily and all…

“‘A Muntagna” is a long journey around Mount Etna and the surrounding area, telling the deep bond that unites the volcano to the women and men who live there, and the extraordinary normality of lives lived in the presence of such a giant, which at any time can generate seismic events. An ambiguous relationship, halfway between the most total devotion and the constant fear for it. They say that when an eruption ends, Etna is already preparing the next one: it’s the eternal confrontation between the volcano and the human beings who have decided to rely on his benevolence.

Views From My Balcony: The Process of Turning Lockdown Into a Body of Work - PhotoShelter Blog

For many photographers, the pandemic has been a time to step back and take stock of their lives and work. It’s provided opportunities to get more organized, look for inspiration and make adjustments to their businesses.  For Gunther Deichmann, a PhotoShel

For Gunther Deichmann, a PhotoShelter member and photographer based in the Philippines, inspiration was waiting for him just outside of his apartment in Manila. Over the last two years, Gunther has compiled more than 18,000 images from a single location: his 10th floor balcony. “Views From My Balcony” is a body of work that turns seclusion from COVID-19 lockdown and restrictions into something magical. It stands as proof that art can be created anywhere, even in the face of monotony.

The Craft of Photography

In my own teaching, I often describe photographs as gifts: they are given to you if you’re able to spot and then take them. This book is a gift. If this (or any other) article spotted it, all that’s left for you is to take it.

A Photographer's Unflinching Portrait of America in Crisis

Philip Montgomery shares the stories behind nine images in his new photobook "American Mirror."

As Patrick Radden Keefe writes in American Mirror, “Montgomery’s photographs capture the reality of Americans in crisis, in all our flawed, tragic, ridiculous glory.” Here, we look at the stories behind nine of Montgomery’s iconic photographs.

Perspective | Why did it take Ukraine to remind us of war photography’s relevance?

When war feels close to home, images function differently.

Even the most horrifying war photographs may leave you with the odd sense of being an unwanted tourist. It is a dreadful tourism, at a terrible cost, but almost as soon as the eye notices the carnage and destruction, it starts registering small and perhaps irrelevant details. The dirt is a darker red, the trees a deeper shade of green, the architecture and dress are different, as are the street signs, the pavement and the cars.
Published
Categorized as War

2022 World Press Photo Contest Winners Announced — Blind Magazine

The World Press Photo Contest recognizes the best photojournalism and documentary photography of the previous year. This year, the winners were chosen out of 64,823 photographs and open format entries, by 4,066 photographers from 130 countries.  World Pre

Global jury chair Rena Effendi said about this image: “It is a kind of image that sears itself into your memory, it inspires a kind of sensory reaction. I could almost hear the quietness in this photograph, a quiet moment of global reckoning for the history of colonization, not only in Canada but around the world.”
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Categorized as Contests