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Hubert Henrotte : A book on photojournalism

Hubert Henrotte! He is one of the mythical names in the history of photojournalism! He too was swept away by the drastic technological changes of the 2000s. Today, he is publishing his beautifully titled book: Can photojournalime save the press? He asked us to publish this excerpt: the interview by Clément Thiery.

In Tulsa, this photojournalist makes time to talk to strangers – Poynter

A few years ago, Mike Simons walked and documented Tulsa’s 16-mile long Peoria Avenue one mile at a time.

“It changed the way I approach my job. Really, how I approach life,” said the Tulsa World staff photographer. “I fell in love with talking to strangers. Just seeing someone interesting, striking up a conversation and photographing them.”

A woman photojournalist navigates state and patriarchy in the Valley

On the morning of 5 August 2019, Masrat Zahra, a young Kashmiri photojournalist, woke up confused. Her phone was not working and the street outside her house looked eerily different. Soon, she learnt that the Narendra Modi-led union government had abrogated Jammu and Kashmir’s special status and split the state into two union territories. From that day till at least 30 August, Zahra went out almost every day to shoot in Kashmir to document the restrictions on movement and communication that the government had imposed, reactions to the move and its human cost. The photographs featured in the gallery are a selection of her work from this time.

Photography in the Era of Digital Proliferation | Conscientious Photography Magazine

The public sphere in which these developments play out has become intertwined with our most private one: we wake up, and we look at our smartphones to check for messages, emails, articles, and/or pictures. Pictures, however, have ceased to be just that, pictures. Instead, they have become essential elements of our communication, whether they’re emojis (which make the connection between pictures and communication most clear), photographs, or whatever else.

Photography in the Era of Digital Proliferation | Conscientious Photography Magazine

The public sphere in which these developments play out has become intertwined with our most private one: we wake up, and we look at our smartphones to check for messages, emails, articles, and/or pictures. Pictures, however, have ceased to be just that, pictures. Instead, they have become essential elements of our communication, whether they’re emojis (which make the connection between pictures and communication most clear), photographs, or whatever else.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 30 August 2019 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – a special edition featuring the 31st Visa Pour L’image Festival in Perpignan, the world’s most renowned photojournalism festival. This year features another amazing collection of visual journalism from around the world.

Visa pour l’Image returns with a focus on press freedom and fake news – British Journal of Photography

The 31st international festival of photojournalism delivers a programme of hard-hitting reportage in an era when increasing hostility threatens freedom of the press

Visa pour l’Image returns with a focus on press freedom and fake news – British Journal of Photography

The 31st international festival of photojournalism delivers a programme of hard-hitting reportage in an era when increasing hostility threatens freedom of the press

Lakes, jails and ice-skating bears: the world’s best photojournalism – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian

The International Festival of Photojournalism takes place in Perpignan, France, every year. Here, photojournalists uncover stories – from war to ecocide – that the powerful would often rather keep secret

W. Eugene Smith: Father of the Photo Essay

William Eugene Smith has been described as “perhaps the single most important American photographer in the development of the editorial photo essay.” He shot photo projects so large that they cannot be displayed in any museum. Let’s take a closer look at this brilliant photographer.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 2 August 2019 – Photojournalism Now

There’s been discussion on Facebook recently about the value of photography awards versus other means of promoting photography such as books. Criticism has been laid that photography awards that charge an entry fee are money-grabbers. That may be true of big international awards that attract thousands of entries by promising global exposure for a select few. The odds in these competitions are like a crapshoot, ridiculously slim.

Tiananmen Square 30 years ago with the Nikon F-801 (the fifth view of the “Tank Man”) – Nikon Rumors

Thirty years ago this week I left China after what was intended to be a week-long stay in Beijing had stretched to 59 days. As a reporter for The Associated Press based in Tokyo, I had gone to Beijing to help with the coverage of the state visit to China by Mikhail Gorbachev, leader of the then Soviet Union. But that assignment quickly morphed from covering the historic mending of the three-decade-old Sino-Soviet split to the AP’s 24/7 reporting from Tiananmen Square covering the student-led protests that culminated in the Chinese army’s violent assault on the demonstrators in the square.

America Used to Promote Photojournalism. Now It Bans It.

Julia Le Duc’s already iconic photograph of a dead father and daughter on the Rio Grande is the latest reminder of how essential photographers are to democracy.

A Crime Scene at the Border – The New York Times

On Tuesday, June 25, Rosa Ramírez was filmed at home in San Martín, El Salvador. Ramírez stands by a doorway in a small interior. She is distraught, and her large brown eyes glisten in the glare of camera lights.

“The last message he sent me was Saturday. He said, ‘Mama, I love you.’ He said, ‘Take care of yourselves because we are fine here.’ ”

How Much Power Can One Image Actually Have?

When the Associated Press published Julia Le Duc’s photograph of a drowned Salvadoran man, Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez, and his 23-month old daughter Valeria, it sparked outrage on social media. According to Le Duc, Ramírez had attempted to cross the Rio Grande after realizing he couldn’t present himself to U.S. authorities to request asylum.

Photo of a Drowned Migrant Father and Daughter Is Fading Fast – Reading The Pictures

Two weeks ago, we predicted in a post here that the photo of two drowning migrants, Óscar Alberto Martínez Ramírez and his daughter, represented a political tipping point. Below, visual scholar Jens Kjeldsen offers a different perspective, based on the workings of landmark news photographs.

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