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Photographer Shahidul Alam, Drik Founder, Seized by Police over his Reporting in Dhaka (Update) | PDNPulse

A group of plainclothes police forcibly removed photographer Shahidul Alam from his home in Dhaka on Sunday night. An official with the Dhaka Metropolitan Police detective branch later said that Alam, founder of the Pathshala Media Institute school and the photo agencies Drik and Majority World, was detained for interrogation over his social media posts and an interview concerning the protests by students in Bangladesh’s capital. Dhaka Tribune reported that he appeared court Monday August 6. The judge denied his lawyer’s request for bail and ordered him to police custody for seven days.

Is Facebook evil? Everything bad about Facebook is bad for the same reason — Quartz

But the imperative to “connect people” lacks the one ingredient essential for being a good citizen: Treating individual human beings as sacrosanct. To Facebook, the world is not made up of individuals, but of connections between them. The billions of Facebook accounts belong not to “people” but to “users,” collections of data points connected to other collections of data points on a vast Social Network, to be targeted and monetized by computer programs.

How a Model Release Turned Her into a Poster Child for…Everything – PhotoShelter Blog

In many locales, so-called “personality rights” allow individuals to control their “right of publicity” – a legal right that allows an individual to control how their likeness is used commercially. Without seeing the fine print of the model release she signed, it’s impossible to speculate whether all the licensed usages were, in fact, legal in all jurisdictions and for all uses. Releases often prohibit using a model’s likeness for controversial topics like cigarettes, adult content, etc without explicit permission from the model.

Crowds, Stoked by Trump’s Rhetoric, Increase Their Ire Toward the Press – The New York Times

“Stop lying!” shouted a man in an American flag T-shirt, one of dozens of Trump supporters who hurled invective at the assembled press corps. Facing the reporters’ work space — and away from the stage where Mr. Trump was set to speak — they flashed middle fingers and chanted “CNN Sucks!” as Jim Acosta, a CNN White House correspondent, attempted to speak on-air.

Photo of Couple Kissing in Rain Gets Bangladeshi Photog Beaten and Fired

Bangladeshi photojournalist Jibon Ahmed recently posted this photo of a couple kissing in the rain to his Facebook page. While it may be a romantic image in your eyes, people in Ahmed’s country felt it was indecent enough that the photographer was reportedly beaten and fired.

The Untold Story of Otto Warmbier, American Hostage | GQ

President Trump hailed him as a catalyst of the summit with Kim Jong-Un. But what happened to Warmbier—the American college student who was sent home brain-damaged from North Korea—is even more shocking than anyone knew.

The Photo Book That Captured How the Soviet Regime Made the Truth Disappear | The New Yorker

The book is called “The Commissar Vanishes.” The title is, incongruously, literal. Its specific reference is to a photograph, from 1919, of a second-anniversary celebration of the October Revolution. In the picture, Vladimir Lenin stands at the top of a set of stairs, surrounded by many unidentified men and children and a few recognizable men, including Leon Trotsky, stationed just in front of Lenin. By the time the photograph was published, in 1967, Trotsky had disappeared: he had been airbrushed out, along with several other commissars.

Japanese Journalist, Missing in Syria Since 2015, Appears in New Video – The New York Times

Jumpei Yasuda, a freelance reporter who often covered war zones, disappeared after traveling to Syria from Turkey in 2015, intending to cover the Syrian civil war. He was believed to have been taken hostage by the Nusra Front, which now calls itself Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham, a group known to capture foreigners for ransom.

News media paid Melania Trump thousands for use of photos in ‘positive stories only’

The first lady earned six figures from an agreement with Getty Images that paid royalties to the Trumps and mandated photos be used in positive coverage.

Getty deletes gallery of World Cup’s ‘sexiest fans’ after criticism | Football | The Guardian

Picture agency Getty has come under fire from campaigners and social media users after publishing, then deleting, a gallery of what it deemed the “sexiest” fans at the World Cup.

How Facebook tried to block distribution of a blockbuster story | Poynter

Reveal’s Byard Duncan thought he could spend $150 to promote the story to a wider group of the 170,000 readers that Reveal helped create on Facebook — but which Facebook has limited its access to. The promotion of the story was important as the administration planned a vast expansion of these migrant centers and internment camps.

Facebook said no.

New Initiative Created by Jill Greenberg Seeks Gender Parity in Advertising Photography | PDNPulse

Photographer Jill Greenberg has launched an online directory in an effort to promote women photographers for advertising jobs, film and television key art, and magazine covers. Called Alreadymade, the platform serves as a resource for clients looking to hire experienced women photographers. To be included on the site, photographers have to have shot at least three ad campaigns, and have handled productions with budgets north of $125,000. Forty-nine women photographers are now listed on Alreadymade, and Greenberg says she plans to continue adding to the list.

What Photographers Need to Know About GDPR

The EU has a new data protection law, the so-called GDPR, the General Data Protection Regulation, or as we Germans like to call it: “Datenschutzgrundverordnung” (Gesundheit!). The rules took effect on May 25th and so far it’s pretty chaotic: in the EU we cannot reach some newspapers in the outside world because they cannot comply with the new rules.

Facebook photo-scanning lawsuit could cost it billions

A federal judge ruled Monday that millions of the social network’s users can proceed as a group with claims that its photo-scanning technology violated an Illinois law by gathering and storing biometric data without their consent. Damages could be steep — a fact that wasn’t lost on the judge, who was unsympathetic to Facebook’s arguments for limiting its legal exposure.

Egyptian Photojournalist Facing Death Penalty Wins ‘Press Freedom Prize’

Egyptian photojournalist Mahmoud Abu Zeid, also known as Shawkan, has been awarded the 2018 UNESCO/Guillermo Cano Press Freedom Prize. Shawkan has been in jail since August 2013 after being arrested for covering the August 2013 Rabaa massacre. He’s also facing the death penalty after the prosecutor reportedly called for it last year.

Journalists, it’s unethical to ignore your online security | Poynter

The Field Guide to Security Training in the Newsroom (a collaboration between OpenNews staff; Amanda Hickman, formerly of Buzzfeed Open Lab; Kevin O’Gorman, integration manager at The Globe and Mail and a slew of contributors) is full of useful information about topics like setting up secure messaging apps, password management and two-factor authentication. It also provides necessary tips and resources for those accidental experts sharing it, like lesson plans and games.

What Facebook Can Learn About You From a Single Uploaded Photo

The Wall Street Journal has published an article (behind a paywall) titled “How Pizza Night Can Cost More in Data Than Dollars.” In it, the WSJ examines subtle ways you may be handing over personal data to Facebook and other high-tech companies during a quiet evening at home.

Deputy Who Shot Photog ‘Reasonably’ Thought Tripod Was Gun: Lawyers

Photographer Andy Grimm was shot at around 10 p.m. on September 4th, 2017, when he pulled into a parking lot to shoot photos of a nearby traffic stop. Clark County deputy Jake Shaw, believing that Grimm was pulling a rifle out of his car, opened fire, hitting Grimm in the arm and stomach.

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