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Supreme Court Denies Co Rentmeester’s Copyright Petition over Nike “Jumpman” | PDNPulse

The U.S. Supreme Court has denied photographer Co Rentmeester’s petition for a hearing on his copyright claim against Nike. The high court announced its decision this morning, but gave no reason for its refusal to hear the case.

Acclaimed photojournalist Tom Stoddart reflects on ‘ringside seat to history’ during remarkable career | London Evening Standard

Acclaimed photojournalist Tom Stoddart has vowed never to put down the camera as he reflects on his remarkable career today.

Raghu Rai: The Man Behind the Lens | The Daily Star

Indian photojournalist and member of the prestigious Magnum Photos, Raghu Rai, is better-known to Bangladeshis for the photos he took during our Liberation War in 1971. Rai, who has been awarded the Friends of Liberation War Honour, recently visited Bangladesh on account of Drik’s Chobi Mela X. This week’s In Focus publishes an interview of Rai with Ananta Yusuf, Producer, Star Live, The Daily Star.

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Eastern Exposures – The Leica camera Blog

Transnistria, the no-man’s land between the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine, rarely makes it into the news. With the exception of the short war between 1990 and 1992, when the country was fighting for independence only to later sink back into east block oblivion. It is precisely these kind of isolated places that interest the French photographer Cédric Viollet, who has already been on photographic exploration trips to Lesotho and Hong Kong.

Elliot Ross: Plainsmen | LENSCRATCH

In Elliot Ross’s series, Plainsmen, we are called to the interior American West—a place which, from an outsider’s perspective, is generally romanticized and oversimplified. The region is too often ignored unless it is politically convenient, and it is sometimes flippantly referred to as flyover country. As a person who grew up in rural Colorado, Ross understands the complexities faced by residents in this part of the country. Though the project is sequenced with photographs of people and places, our awareness is continuously being redirected toward the younger generation. They embody the heritage and lifestyle of their parents and connote values typically associated with rural American communities, including honesty and hard work. Despite this, their futures remain uncertain due to growing social and economic distress. Ross poignantly brings this dilemma to our attention and asks us to consider the future of the West and its residents—not the West of mythology, but that of fragile reality.

Elliot Ross: Plainsmen | LENSCRATCH

In Elliot Ross’s series, Plainsmen, we are called to the interior American West—a place which, from an outsider’s perspective, is generally romanticized and oversimplified. The region is too often ignored unless it is politically convenient, and it is sometimes flippantly referred to as flyover country. As a person who grew up in rural Colorado, Ross understands the complexities faced by residents in this part of the country. Though the project is sequenced with photographs of people and places, our awareness is continuously being redirected toward the younger generation. They embody the heritage and lifestyle of their parents and connote values typically associated with rural American communities, including honesty and hard work. Despite this, their futures remain uncertain due to growing social and economic distress. Ross poignantly brings this dilemma to our attention and asks us to consider the future of the West and its residents—not the West of mythology, but that of fragile reality.

A Portrait of Prepubescent Style in South Wales | The New Yorker

Of all the images that the photographer Clémentine Schneidermann and the art director Charlotte James have made of (and with) children in South Wales, few show interior scenes. Here is one, in which, amid the gloom and clatter of a community center, two figures are brightly lit. A young girl with blond ringlets gives the camera a bored glare, while a red-haired boy, wearing a luxe hillock of green fake fur, flashes us his newly augmented fingernails. Beside his sullen companion, the boy looks like a prepubescent night-club impresario, or a glamorous tween art star. In a photographic project that invites children to style and invent themselves, he might be the most daring of all. Elsewhere, you’ll spot him in platform boots and off-the-shoulder brown velour, his face full of cheek, and his cigarette delicately plied.

The Future of Sublime Landscapes | PDN Photo of the Day

Drawing upon the language of 19th century survey photographs, Drew Nikonowicz‘s work investigates the existence and role of a contemporary explorer by combining computer-generated and traditional photographic processes. The images in his first monograph, This World and Others Like It (Yoffy Press, 2019), suggest earth’s landscapes have been conquered and the only remaining frontiers are fictional or extraterrestrial.

A Conversation With Alec Soth About Art and Doubt – The New York Times

Ahead of his latest solo show and book, the photographer talks with T’s Hanya Yanagihara about the often unsettling power dynamic of taking a person’s picture, and their shared love of the artists who do it so well.

Alleged Copyright Infringer Hits Back Against Photographer Tom Hussey | PDNPulse

A Florida businessman accused by photographer Tom Hussey of copyright infringement has struck back, accusing Hussey of committing “fraud on the court” by repeatedly suing over a photograph that isn’t properly registered. The defendant, Charles Ngo of Miami, charges Hussey and the image tracking service ImageRights International with “shaking down people for money where there is no such entitlement.”

Chronicling the Reasons Central Americans Migrate to the United States – The New York Times

For half a decade, Fred Ramos has photographed the longstanding political, social and environmental crises that are driving migration in the region.

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 22 March, 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – Format Festival in the UK and the Australian and New Zealand Photobook Award. Plus check out my review for Australian Book Review of a new academic text, Visualising Human Rights. Next week there won’t be a blog post as I’m taking the weekend off for a family wedding!

Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 22 March, 2018 – Photojournalism Now

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – Format Festival in the UK and the Australian and New Zealand Photobook Award. Plus check out my review for Australian Book Review of a new academic text, Visualising Human Rights. Next week there won’t be a blog post as I’m taking the weekend off for a family wedding!

The Death of a Parent, Captured in Photos – Feature Shoot

The photographer Argus Paul Estabrook remembers his mother calling him from the hospital, and he remembers flying from Seoul to be with his family in the United States. But much of his father’s battle with pancreatic cancer remains a blur. By the time he was diagnosed, it had already reached Stage 4, and when it was all said and done, Estabrook‘s father would live for only three more weeks. “Time was really jumbled like that one drawer where nothing is in the right place,” the photographer admits. “Memories become fractured and mixed together.”

The Problem Isn’t the Photo Contest, It’s Us – PhotoShelter Blog

Eye-rolls, shrugs, and barbs greeted the $120,000 Grand Prize winner of Dubai’s HIPA Photography Prize. Malaysian photographer Edwin Ong’s photo of a partially blind Vietnamese woman carrying her baby was derided for representing yet another “poverty porn” contest winner before it was suggested that the image was staged by photographer Ab Rashid.

Sébastien Van Malleghem – Nordic Noir « burn magazine

An artistic residence in Norway (Halsnoy Cloister, 2013) ignites a passion with the North. Iceland, then Scandinavia further fuels the flame, revealing a personal confrontation with an endless space, a passionate and brutal encounter.

The Grieving Woman at the Ethiopian Airlines Crash Site, and the Western Gaze – Reading The Pictures

This astonishing photo from the Ethiopian Airlines crash site hits me two ways. The expression of grief is so intense, I cannot forget it, all the way down to the tension in this woman’s cheek, jaw, and neck, and the dirt that misses her face and seems permanently suspended. At the same, however, I feel challenged looking at the photo as a westerner.

Hoda Afshar and how to see people as individuals – Witness

The question of how the different members of society are represented make for some of the most heated debates in photography. Whether it’s the New York Times showing pictures of distress in Kenya, the distancing strategies used by Richard Mosse in his installation featuring migrants on their journey to Europe, or even Dorothea Lange’s image of Florence Thompson, the Migrant Mother, the question of who is represented, where they are represented and how they are represented is never far from the surface.

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