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Alyson Fox likes doing things. In her case, ‘things’ mean drawing, taking pictures, designing clothes, making shop windows pretty – and probably one or two more ‘things’ since we last talked.

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Is it possible for a photograph to change the world? Photographs taken by soldiers in Abu Ghraib prison changed the war in Iraq and changed America’s image of itself. Yet, a central mystery remains. Did the notorious Abu Ghraib photographs constitute evidence of systematic abuse by the American military, or were they documenting the aberrant behavior of a few “bad apples”? We set out to examine the context of these photographs. Why were they taken? What was happening outside the frame? We talked directly to the soldiers who took the photographs and who were in the photographs. Who are these people? What were they thinking? Over two years of investigation, we amassed a million and a half words of interview transcript, thousands of pages of unredacted reports, and hundreds of photographs. The story of Abu Ghraib is still shrouded in moral ambiguity, but it is clear what happened there. The Abu Ghraib photographs serve as both an expose and a coverup

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photo by Veronique de Viguerie

The French Association of Women Journalists (AFJ) and Canon France are launching, with Images Evidence, the eighth Canon Female Photojournalist Award.

The Award is open to professional women photojournalists of any age and nationality and is supported by Le Figaro Magazine. It is presented every year during the Visa pour l’Image Festival in Perpignan, France. Canon France grants the winning photographer €8,000 to help her complete a photojournalistic project.

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Knowing my love for Black & White imagery, Nack pointed me towards some astonishing in-house talent, right here on W10. Yesterday I enjoyed an hour with Kelly Castro who gave me a glimpse into his very unique workflow. I’m not going to tell you everything about how Kelly gets his shots to jump off the screen, but I will showcase a few very cool steps. If you’re like me, the shots will inspire you far more than my words can.

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Sze Tsung Leong’s project Horizons is meditation on the vast and varied landscapes found in disparate parts of the world. His panoramic images, although often geographically dissimilar, are linked through a continuous horizon line that when viewed as a whole creates visual and thematic relationships between differing images.

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In honor of this tenth anniversary, we went back to a few PDN’s 30 photographers and asked them to once again share some advice with the next generation of photographers. We asked each of them: What is one of the most important lessons you’ve learned? How have your career goals changed? And, of course: What have you been doing lately?

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Matt Borruso creates stunningly demented portraits of ugly children. The garish candy colors vibrate, making these unfortunate kids equally nauseating and mouth watering.

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Every quarter we publish a fashion magazine similar to the T Magazine from the New York Times. The shoot consists of several days of shooting, weeks of meetings, editing and production, and the nail-biting time of waiting for the special section to arrive from the printer. The spring edition of LUXE, as it is aptly named, was produced around a theme of travel. Our resident painter created the background “destination” images. I spent a week photographing the models in the studio and edited down the take to a negotiable few. Then we dropped the cutouts on the page and arranged them to create compelling compositions that read well and received excellent feedback from the readers.

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German photographer Frank Breuer, a disciple of the Becher’s and propagator of the Düsseldorf aesthetic, captures the sterility of industrial and commercial architecture. Stylistically, his images do not stray far from those of his mentors, choosing to appease rather than challenge the well established German aesthetic

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By MICHAEL KAMBER

Photojournalist Joao Silva and I jumped in a car and searched the streets. We found U.S. soldiers towing a damaged Humvee. It had been struck by a roadside bomb. Days later we were nearly knocked off our feet by the Red Cross bombing, which killed scores. Bodies were scattered across an entire city block.

Joao, myself and Dexter Filkins were set upon by a crowd and nearly killed as we covered the attacks that morning.

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I snapped a photo of this sticker in one of the restrooms at Ritual Coffee Roasters in San Francisco’s Mission District

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Veteran Journalists Confess To Directing Photos.  March 19, 2008.

Li Zhencheng graduated in 1963 from the Department of Photography of the Changchun Academy of Cinematography and later became a photojournalist at Heilongjiang Daily News.  In the 1980’s, he went to teach at the Department of Journalism at the China People’s Police University.  As a professional photojournalist, he had taken and preserved a large number of Cultural Revolution-era photos with the unique characteristics of those times. 

On March 7, Li posted a photograph titled: Yet Another High Quality Well on his personal blog.  He stated in very clear terms that this photograph had been directed and modified 35 years ago.  “From the viewpoint of composition and lighting, this photo is quite perfect.  In reality, there are many places in which modifications and forgery occurred.  Back in those days, I was all for reasonably organization and modification.  I advocated direction and alteration without giving any hints.”  Li challenged his blog visitors to detect the flaws.

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Archie Lieberman roamed the world as a photojournalist. But he found fodder for one of his most memorable books on a farm nestled in the rolling hills of Jo Daviess County, a few hours west of his Evanston home.

Mr. Lieberman, 81, died of a neurological disease similar to Parkinson’s on Thursday, March 13, at Dubuque Nursing and Rehab Center in Iowa, said his wife, Esther. After many years in Evanston, he moved to a small farm near Galena in the mid-1980s.

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Hundreds of Iraqi journalists have been forced into exile since the war started five years ago, Reporters without Borders announced in a report released Wednesday.

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Associated Press photographer Bilal Hussein, the subject of secret court proceedings in Iraq, still has not been told the charges against him, AP president and CEO Tom Curley said Tuesday.

Hussein has been held by the U.S. military for nearly two years as a security detainee, informally accused of working in collusion with insurgents. At his first hearing in the Iraqi court system on Dec. 9, a judge imposed a gag order on the participants. The AP and the U.S. military have maintained near-silence about the Hussein since then.

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I read about the Photography Book Now salon and symposium last night, and thought it was too good to be true. I mean, a contest celebrating self-published photo books? With the promise of MONEY? What What!? But look, they say it is true:

“Join the modern photography book movement. Photographers can now produce books with complete creative control. We’re celebrating the most innovative and finest self-published photography books and the people behind them. Submit yours for a chance at $25,000 to finish – or start – that once in a lifetime project.”

Check it out here.

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It was Philip’s consummate skill as a picture maker, carefully able to draw the viewer closer and closer to his subjects through his emotionally-charged compositions that lent such power to his work. Philip was always concerned with individuals – their personal and intimate suffering more than any particular class or ideological struggle. And the strength of his vision, that inspired so many of us, led Henri Cartier-Bresson to write of Philip: “not since Goya has anyone portrayed war like Philip Jones Griffiths.”

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British photojournalist Philip Jones Griffiths, known for his unflinching coverage of the Vietnam war, died on Tuesday aged 72, the Magnum photo agency said.
    Born in Wales in 1936, Griffith Jones launched his career as a freelancer for Britain’s Observer newspaper in 1961, covering the Algerian war in 1962 before travelling across central Africa.
    In a career that took him to more than 120 countries, Griffith Jones covered everything from Buddhism in Cambodia, drought in India, poverty in Texas or the legacy of the Gulf war in Kuwait.

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