join the photo community - The Click is edited by Trent

VOTE_sm.jpg

Call to Action! – Obey Giant: “As many of you may be wondering what’s the deal with this latest print, well, here is the lowdown… Shepard recently created this print to stir up some motivation for individuals to get up and participate in the Presidential Electoral process. These past 8 years have been rough, watching and experiencing a great nation get demoralized by an Administration with selfish intent. We hope to change that this time around with some promising Presidential Candidates. Shepard created this print with the goal to fund a campaign to hit the streets with these pasters to make a call to action to VOTE! These prints will be available sometime this week so keep an eye on the site. Screenprint Edition of 350, 24″ x 36″, at $50 each. 1 VOTE per customer.”

122200812316.jpg

Campaign Visuals In The Age Of Facebook – – PopPhotoJanuary 2008: “Stephen Ferry is a freelance documentary photographer based in New York City and Bogotá, Colombia. Ferry’s work has received numerous prizes and honors, including two World Press photo awards. In more than 20 years of international travel, Ferry has concentrated on long-term reportage on issues of historic change and human rights. His 1999 book, I Am Rich Potosí: The Mountain that Eats Men (Monacelli Press), documented the lives of silver miners in Potosí, Bolivia, over an eight-year period. Since 2000, Ferry has focused his work on Colombia, carrying out assignments for GEO, National Geographic, Time, Newsweek, U.S. News & World Report, and The New York Times. He is currently based in Bogotá and is dedicated to long-term coverage of Colombia’s civil war. In this Q&A we discuss his image, shown here, taken January 7 at a campaign stop in Rochester, New Hampshire.”

detroithardcore4_2_2.jpg

WFMU’s Beware of the Blog: Tony Rettman on Detroit Hardcore: “And, after educating yourself on the impressive history of Touch and Go Magazine, the Necros and Negative Approach, be sure to peep Elisa’s list for yourself. Not only does the Magik Markers guitarist-vocalist give mention to one of my favorite novels (the gleaming tale of suburban disquiet, Revolutionary Road), she rustles up a fine collection of personal and cultural touchstones for your mind before you peace-out ‘07 for good.”

VII Photo Expands To Represent Non-Member Photographers: “The VII Photo agency announced a new division this week called VII Network, which will represent projects by photographers who are not VII members.

At its launch, VII Network is representing seven freelance photojournalists: Eric Bouvet, Jessica Dimmock, Tivadar Domaniczky, Balazs Gardi, Ben Lowy, Stephanie Sinclair and Donald Weber. VII Network will represent these photographers exclusively worldwide, says VII managing director Frank Evers.”

champ 1.jpg

Pale Fire: Interview: Photographer Brad Troemel expounds on the virtues of giving ups to artsits while they are still alive.: “Brad Troemel is not dead, nor is he a character in a perversely metafictional narrative entirely of my own creation. He is a young and talented photographer currently based out of Chicago. From what I can see he is also very busy. Aside from school and producing new work he also maintains a website where you can browse through archives of his previous projects and a relatively informal blog where he habitually hypes the artists he loves and occasionally self-promotes (though usually by association.) Carrying on along those lines, Brad curated a show of some of his favorite photographers at the Satin Satan Gallery (for details see poster below.) Additionally, ‘Glacier’, his upcoming solo show about ‘land displacement and the suburb’s relationship with the natural world’, will open at Reuben Kincaid Project Space (3219 S Morgan, Chicago, IL) on March 8th and carry on through April 12th. It will feature never before seen work.

I contacted Brad because his work, even apart from its aesthetic quality, almost always seems to hint at an engagement with aspects of the ‘artistic persona’. In our correspondence he never raised any major objections to my interpretation, which is not to say there were no surprises in store. I sent him groups of questions, he responded, and we even bonded in a touching montage sequence (not depicted here.) These are the results:”

(Via Very Young Millionaire.)

0120-su_d01_persA_0120.jpg

Telling War Stories: “Jeff Bundy, a photographer with the Omaha World-Herald, covered a Nebraska Army National Guard unit in Iraq during fall 2005. Bundy said books he has read about Vietnam suggest it was a much easier war to cover simply because of mobility.

‘When you talk to those guys, they’d just jump on a Huey, and they go out,’ Bundy said. ‘There was no jumping on a Huey for us. Now you have to do the paperwork and the disclaimers and get yourself on a flight. Because of the way the world has moved, it’s tougher to move throughout the country.’

And unlike the reporters who covered Vietnam, the journalists embedded with the military in Iraq signed an agreement acknowledging that all comments of military personnel are ‘on the record.’ In Vietnam, reporters made much greater use of unnamed sources.”

poguepost.531 1.jpg

Cameras PermittedMaybe – Pogue’s Posts – Technology – New York Times Blog: “Anyway, I brought my new Nikon D80 and my trusty image-stabilized, 18-200 millimeter (11X zoom) lens. This event absolutely screamed out for this camera: three frames per second, 11X zoom, image-stabilized. I was looking forward to getting some truly rockin’ shots, like the ones I’d taken at a monster-truck rally we saw last year in the same arena.

Amazingly, the guard stopped me at the door. ‘You can’t take that in there,’ he said. ‘Detachable lens.’

Say what?

‘You can bring pocket cameras, but no detachable lenses.’”

meghanandfriend1.jpg

Half Sigma: Meghan McCain’s photographer sucks: “The first thing that hits me when I look at Meghan McCain’s ‘Blogette’ is that the photography really sucks. Who is taking such bad photos?

Why are the photos so bad? They look like they are taken with a pocket digital camera and not a DSLR. All the photos have a very wide depth of field, which is the telltale sign of a pocket digital camera with a tiny sensor.”

0121MCPicture 1 1.png

MediaStorm: Rape of a Nation by Marcus Bleasdale: “The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is home to the deadliest war in the world today. An estimated 5.4 million people have died since 1998, the largest death toll since the Second World War, according to the International Rescue Committee (IRC).

IRC reports that as many as 45,000 people die each month in the Congo. Most deaths are due to easily preventable and curable conditions, such as malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia, malnutrition, and neonatal problems and are byproducts of a collapsed healthcare system and a devastated economy.

The people living in the mining towns of eastern Congo are among the worst off. Militia groups and government forces battle on a daily basis for control of the mineral-rich areas where they can exploit gold, coltan, cassiterite and diamonds.

After successive waves of fighting and ten years of war, there are no hospitals, few roads and limited NGO and UN presence because it is too dangerous to work in many of these regions. The West’s desire for minerals and gems has contributed to a fundamental breakdown in the social structure.”

01212SPicture 1 1.png

Blueeyes: Portfolio, by Cosmin Bumbut: “Cosmin Bumbut’s work sits on the fence between the old world and the new. As one frame meets the next, the viewer is at once reminded of Josef Koudelka and Luc Delahaye. Villagers wait roadside for nothing to happen; men compete in black and white impromptu bodybuilding competitions. A lone fiery window glares out from a tenement building; a specter appears in front of a crossed doorway as if barred from entry.

Bumbut’s varied and unique work is at times frustrating: his children sleep with one eye open and fall from his viewfinder into the wide, grey sea, his subjects stare at you through glazed windows and pinholes. Like Delahaye’s images, one can sense both the familiarity and the unease the photographer and subject alike have within the moments the images are made.”

20080114__20080115_A01_CD15LEGBRUCE~p1 1.JPG

The Denver Post – House panel chides Bruce over kick: “A six-member Capitol panel voted unanimously today to recommend that the House censure Rep. Douglas Bruce for kicking a news photographer.

The panel of lawmakers took testimony from four people — starting with the Rocky Mountain News photographer who was kicked in the leg for taking Bruce’s picture during the morning prayer.

‘I didn’t expect him to kick me with a Bible in the hand,’ photographer Javier Manzano testified.”

170x90BLOG_Powers.jpg

Appleton Post-Crescent – Eye on the Ball Blog: GAME PLAN FOR THE BIG GAME: “Covering the big game requires a different approach than your typical game. A game plan is crucial because you coverage starts well before kickoff and continues well after the final whistle. Sunday’s NFC Championship game is a perfect example of how using a team approach paid off in the end. Oh…and you can’t forget what it takes to battle the elements…man was it cold! Here’s how things went from my perspective…

Because of the national attention this game gets, we arrived at Lambeau Field at about 12:30p.m. to make sure we could get enough workspace in the photography workroom. Boy were we glad we did. I haven’t seen this many photographers since I shot Super Bowl XL in Detroit. It was a madhouse.”

patrick_double_model 1.jpg

Color + Design Blog / Interview with Patrick Winfield: Polaroidologist by COLOURlovers: “I love Polaroid, so when the opportunity came along to interview Patrick Winfield, a graphic designer and photographer who frequently uses Polaroid to create dynamic visual stories, I jumped at the chance to speak with him.

Patrick’s work has a healthy following. I’m excited he took time to share his work; his love of Polaroid and playing around.”

(Via http://www.woostercollective.com.)

macgyver-clip 1.jpg

Be a multimedia McGuyver – 101 DIY tools and techniques for cool, professional photo, audio and video gear on the cheap | Will Sullivan’s Journerdism: “Long, long ago in high school and college I used to do a bunch of indy films with friends and classmates for fun (and some school classes). We never had any money so we couldn’t buy expensive gear like steadycams and jigs, but we did have Home Depot, some tools, lots of time and ingenuity so we were able to cobble together makeshift gear to make things work.

Now-a-days, the magical internet has connected A/V nerds and backyard engineering geeks. Here’s a long list of cool video, photo, audio and multimedia techniques, tools and things to try out:”

Close Menu