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X-Arcade:

The newest addition to Xgaming’s award-winning lineup remains faithful to it’s arcadian ancestry and injects the most complete and authentic home arcade gaming experience into your home.

Here.

BBC:

Pablo Wendel, made up like an ancient warrior, jumped into a pit showcasing the 2,200-year-old pottery soldiers and stood motionless for several minutes.

The 26-year-old was eventually spotted by police and removed from the scene.

Unearthed in 1974, the statues are said to be one of the 20th Century’s greatest archaeological finds.

Here.

BBC:

Mr Boks said he tried to withdraw permits for the elephant on grounds of public safety last Friday, but found the three-day exhibition would be over before they took effect.

“Permits will not be issued for such frivolous abuse of animals in the future,” he said.

Tai’s owner, Kari Johnson, denied that the 38-year-old Indian elephant had suffered as a result of the paint job.

Here.

Wired:

The U.S. military in Iraq has imprisoned an Associated Press photographer for five months, accusing him of being a security threat but never filing charges or permitting a public hearing.

Military officials said Bilal Hussein, an Iraqi citizen, was being held for “imperative reasons of security” under United Nations resolutions. AP executives said the news cooperative’s review of Hussein’s work did not find anything to indicate inappropriate contact with insurgents, and any evidence against him should be brought to the Iraqi criminal justice system.

Hussein, 35, is a native of Fallujah who began work for the AP in September 2004. He photographed events in Fallujah and Ramadi until he was detained on April 12 of this year.

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Addicteed:

So I recently came across the “fuct facts” where it is made clear that Shepard Fairey aka OBEY has “borrowed” several designs and ideas from fuct, you have publicly addressed your opinion about him – What does Shepard have to say about all this? Has he/you ever tried to contact each other about this matter?

I could care less about OBEY, or anything else they “borrow”. They all
seem very unhappy all the time in that camp. They all need hugs.

Here.

BrightNights:

FUCT printed this graphic on t-shirts titled “Mao-Now!” circa 1993.
In response to a simple question that Erik had asked himself: “Who is the Lucifer of China ?” while brainstorming ideas for a logo that would faithfully represent Evil in Asia. Sure enough, genocide-genius Chairman Mao Zedong (pronounced Tse Tung) came up as contestant number one !

OBEY printed a similar Mao graphic, a few years down the line. The Giant campaign was promoting cultural revolution by portraying a true visionary as an emblem of hope and world peace.

Here.

Ken Irby, Poynter:

The Times has very clear guidelines in place that prohibit image manipulation without clear cause and disclosure:
Photography and Images.
Images in our pages that purport to depict reality must be genuine in every way. No people or objects may be added, rearranged, reversed, distorted or removed from a scene (except for the recognized practice of cropping to omit extraneous outer portions). Adjustments of color or gray scale should be limited to those minimally necessary for clear and accurate reproduction, analogous to the “burning” and “dodging” that formerly took place in darkroom processing of images. Pictures of news situations must not be posed. In the cases of collages, montages, portraits, fashion or home design illustrations, fanciful contrived situations and demonstrations of how a device is used, our intervention should be unmistakable to the reader, and unmistakably free of intent to deceive. Captions and credits should further acknowledge our intervention if the slightest doubt is possible. The design director, a masthead editor or the news desk should be consulted on doubtful cases or proposals for exceptions.
Here.

Washington Post:

Gill signed his entries “Fatality666” and once called himself “Trench,” an apparent reference to the black trench coat he wore in imitation of the two teenage assailants who killed 12 students and a faculty member at Columbine High School in Colorado in 1999. He was fascinated by that attack, according to his journal, and played Super Columbine Massacre RPG, a video game that re-creates the rampage. He also raved about “Postal3,” a similar assault game, and listed a variety of other favorite games, most of them with themes of mayhem.

“Life is a video game. You’ve got to die sometime,” Gill wrote.

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Washington Post:

Fact No. 8, probably one of the most important, notes that, contrary to what you might have heard, the prisoners actually really want to be in Guantanamo. “The mother of a detainee stated: ‘Of course they wanted to stay there. . . . They had human rights and good living standards there. They had dentists and good meals — everything they wanted.’ ” Turns out, this quote from a March 2004 edition of the London Times was a Russian mother comparing Guantanamo with Russian jails.

There was “Arabic language TV,” a large library with books in 13 languages. “The most requested book is ‘Harry Potter,’ ” we’re told.

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Editor & Publisher:

He estimated that there are probably 50 murders and 20 to 30 kidnappings in Baghdad every day, and said that it had gotten to the point where it was no longer just Sunni-Shiite clashes or insurgent mayhem. “Nobody trusts anybody anymore,” he said. “There’s no law, and the worst people with guns are in charge.”

According to Filkins, the New York Times is burning through money “like jet fuel” simply to securely maintain its operations in the country. In addition to the 70 local reporters and translators, the Times employs 45 full-time Kalashnikov-toting security guards to patrol its two blast-wall-enclosed houses — and oversee belt-fed machine-guns on the roofs of the buildings. The paper also has three armored cars, and pays a hefty premium each month to insure the five Times reporters working there.

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DP Review:

The M8 is not an adapted M7, it is a totally new camera with a new body (albeit one that bears all the usual M trademarks), a new viewfinder and a new sensor. Nor is it necessarily the end of the line for M film cameras; Leica is leaving that door open, for the moment at least.

Here.

Washington Post:

Wounded and locked in a harrowing gunfight deep in Afghanistan’s Hindu Kush mountains, Navy SEAL Petty Officer 2nd Class Matthew G. Axelson laid down covering fire so a teammate could escape — an act of heroism for which Axelson was yesterday posthumously awarded the Navy Cross, the service’s second-highest medal.

Fighting nearby, Petty Officer 2nd Class Danny P. Dietz was also mortally wounded but stood his ground in a barrage of fire from 30 to 40 Taliban militiamen who surrounded his four-man SEAL reconnaissance team on June 28, 2005. For his “undaunted courage,” as described by the military, Dietz, 25, of Littleton, Colo., also posthumously received the Navy Cross yesterday in a ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial.

Here.

On avait promis d’attendre jusqu’au 15 septembre, mais d’autres ayant déjà laché leurs infos et même une intéressante vidéo du Leica M8, nous considérerons que l’embargo est caduque… Voici donc notre prise en main en quasi exclusivité !

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Zeiss:

Never before has the world of photography seen such a lens. Developed for long distance wildlife photography this supertele lens provides 21x magnification. In search of the highest imaginable image quality the client decided for 6×6 medium format and the Hasselblad 203 FE as the best camera he is aware of.

At 1700 mm focal length and a speed of f/4 this lens put requirements on optical glas, lens assembly and quality assurance methods, never before encountered in photo lens manufacture. This 256 kg behemoth also required Carl Zeiss to develop totally new ways of operating a telephoto lens, including servo controlled aiming and focusing.

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The most hilarious training video out there, from Gamecrazy. Especially whenever Zelda Scott is onscreen.
Joystiq:

Who is Zelda Scott? The on-the-floor correspondent helping Croft and Payne talk to the GameCrazy employees presented. She must think she has some grasp on pop culture. Let’s take a look at some of our favorite phrases:

  • “They can’t hate on our used games.”
  • “Bomb-diggity!”
  • “Gail is getting extremely jiggy with it by going for the MVP.”
  • Give it up G-Unit, you showed some mad skills there.”
  • “Krunk!”
  • “Tru dat, girl. [To Croft and Payne] Homeslices?”
  • “Bling Bling!”

… and that’s just a sampler.

Gametrailers:

Here.

The New Yorker:

In 2002, Abu Musab al-Suri, in his hideout in Iran, began  writing his defining work, “Call for Worldwide Islamic Resistance,” which is sixteen hundred pages long and was published on the Internet in December, 2004. Didactic and repetitive, but also ruthlessly candid, the book dissects the  faults of the jihadi movement and lays out a plan for the future of the struggle. The goal, he  writes, is “to bring about the largest number of  human and material casualties possible for  America and its allies.” He specifically targets  Jews, “Westerners in general,” the members of  the NATO alliance, Russia, China, atheists,  pagans, and hypocrites, as well as “any type of  external enemy.” (The proliferation of  adversaries mirrors Al Qaeda’s hatred of all other ideologies.
And yet, at the same time, he bitterly blames Al Qaeda for dragging the entire jihadi movement into an unequal battle that it is likely to lose. Unlike most jihadi theorists, Suri acknowledges the setback caused by September 11th. He laments the demise of the Taliban, which he and other Salafi jihadis considered the modern world’s only true Islamic government. America’s “war on terror,” he complains, doesn’t discriminate between Al Qaeda adherents and Muslims in general. “Many loyal Muslims,” he writes, believe that the September 11th attacks “justified the American assault and have given it a legitimate rationale for reoccupying the Islamic world.” But Suri goes on to argue that America’s plans for international domination were already evident “in the likes of Nixon and Kissinger,” and that this agenda would have been pursued without the provocation of September 11th.

Moreover, the American attack on Afghanistan was not really aimed at capturing or killing bin Laden; its true goal was to sweep away the Taliban and eliminate the rule of Islamic law.
In Suri’s view, the underground terrorist movement—that is, Al Qaeda and its sleeper cells—is defunct. This approach was “a failure on all fronts,” because of its inability to achieve military victory or to rally the Muslim people to its cause. He proposes that the next stage of jihad will be characterized by terrorism created by individuals or small autonomous groups (what he terms “leaderless resistance”), which will wear down the enemy and prepare the ground for the far more ambitious aim of waging war on “open fronts”—an outright struggle for territory. He explains, “Without confrontation in the field and seizing control of the land, we cannot establish a state, which is the strategic goal of the resistance.”

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Wooster Collective:

Families visiting Disneyland on their holiday this week saw a life-size Guantanamo bay inmate standing inside the Rocky Mountain Railroad ride at Disneyland in Anaheim California.

The sculpture, consisting of an inflatable doll dressed in an orange jumpsuit with its hands and feet manacled remained in place for one and a half hours before Disneyland’s security staff shut down the ride and removed it amid fears over public safety.

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Journal of a Photographer:

The stories that you can find above are only some examples of multimedia journalism. Some of them are more advanced than others, some use photography together with audio narratives, some are combined with video some might only use ambient sound. As I wrote in the beginning, this form of storytelling is becoming more important and widespread. But not only that, it is really exciting!
I do not think that multimedia features will replace the traditional publishing ways for photojournalists and I don’t see the combination of still photography and audio as a threat to classical photojournalism. I see it as an additional way to show your work, to give a better understanding of the story you want to tell, to add more layers to it, to give your subject a voice and last but not least reach a much broader audience with the work you do. Oh yeah, this can be so powerful!

Here.

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