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From WFMU’s Beware of the Blog:

Every week or so I can expect an email in my inbox from my friend Jussi in Finland, asking me if I know some totally-off-the-wall obscuro 1980’s metal band whom he worships. Recently he sent me a link to a documentary trailer for Shock Tilt, a film recounting the story of a Finnish group who went to Germany to seek fame and fortune only to have their lead singer butchered by their creepy manager, which became a big national news event.

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From Wooster Collective:

Mark Jenkins is taking it to another level with his new “Embeds”. The sculptures are made of tape and then clothes are added. The photo above are of first installation that went up yesterday in DC.

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From the Daily Sun, Nigeria’s King of the Tabloids:

As you enter through the back gate of the new Area 1 shopping complex under construction, he sits proudly, apparently oblivion of his physical state, on his wheel chair.

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Gueorgui Pinkhassov photo essay, From Magnum Photos:
Le Bon Marché, Galerie Entretemps, Paris From 6 June to 7 July 2006
This exhibition gathers together colourful views taken in the streets of Tokyo. Stolen moments of the everyday life of the city seem to be frozen into beauty: a car park in a shopping mall, a coffeeshop, the fish market, the traditional sitting pose of a man at the fish market, Ueno park etc. Stamped with the unique eye of Gueorgui Pinkhassov, they are characterized by his mastery of framing and light.The photographer always seem to look where other people don’t and to focus on what other people discard, which gives birth to outstanding compositions with blurred foregrounds, plays on reflections and shadows… All that apparently only depending on where his sightwalk takes him.

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From the Daily Sun, Nigeria’s King of the Tabloids:

The joint opens as early in the morning. The 45-year-old widow may not be seen around but some of her five children are always In a day, about give long snake are consumed. Mrs. Iyabo’s dilemma in giving the place a name is based on the fact that the joint also sell snail, cow tail, fried meat, and of course, drinks.

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From CJR:

Who was Musab al-Zarqawi? Evil mastermind or bumbling fool? Intelligent or doltish? Enterprising terrorist or al Queda puppet? As the bloated, bloody face of America’s enemy number one in Iraq dominated the front pages of newspapers today, reporters on the scene could not even agree on the answer to a simple question: Who the hell was this guy?
That he killed many, or at least set off forces that inspired the killing of many, is not in question. But almost everything else is. Here’s the second paragraph of Jeffrey Gettleman’s profile today in the New York Times: “His life story was riddled with contradictions: he was close to Saddam Hussein, he was fighting Mr. Hussein; he had two legs, he had one; he was Palestinian, he was Jordanian; he was right-handed, he was left-handed; he was a cunning leader, he was an illiterate brute.”
Indeed, Gettleman goes so far as to state that “several people who knew Mr. Zarqawi well, including former cellmates, voiced doubts about his ability to be an insurgent leader, or the leader of anything.” (Emphasis ours.)

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From the New York Times:

“Whadda you kidding? It’s a zoo out there. Two deli stickups at 12 on the dot; one of the perps getting plugged. I got the picture. Roulette joint bust on East 68th. Society types. You shoulda seen the penguins run. Three a.m.: Brooklyn. Car crash. Kids. Bad.”

“Four a.m., bars close. Guys asleep in Bowery doorways. But just before dawn is the worst: despair city. The jumpers start, out the windows, off the roof. I can’t even look. So that’s the night, New York. Ain’t it grand? What a life.”

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The first issue of the new online magazine NoTxt is now online. Great stuff. Thanks to everyone who contributed.
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YES!

From McDonald’s Interactive Division:

McDonald’s Interactive was formed four years ago to help the company adapt to new market conditions.

“We began developing a simulation of the fast-food industry, for use by managers in developing market strategies.” said Division CTO Sam Grossman. “When we added a climate simulation module, it showed those strategies helping lead to global calamity.”

“Management doesn’t seem to care, and we can’t sit back and fiddle while Rome burns, so our team has decided to break away from McDonald’s and do something about it,” said Grossman.

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The Yes Men strike again!

From Gamasutra, via boing-boing:

According to online reports, the UK-based International Serious Games Event, which deals with games for educational, corporate training, and other uses, this week hosted its conference in Birmingham, England, complete with a session by Andrew Shimery-Wolf, Strategic Comm. Mgr at fast food giant McDonald’s, on “McChange: Serious Games from Training to Corporate Social Responsibility.”

Shimery-Wolf claims to be part of an organization named McDonald’s Interactive, which has apparently announced that it “is striking out on its own from parent company McDonald’s.” “We can no longer stand by while McDonald’s corporate policies help lead the planet to ruin,” said Andrew Shimery-Wolf, co-director of the former Interactive Division.

However, as is clear by the apparent text of Shimery-Wolf’s speech at the legitimate International Serious Games Event, someone has been hoaxed – the speech claims that McDonald’s has run an elaborate ‘serious game’ to help work out the future of its business.

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From The Salt Lake Tribune:

The photographs in this gallery were taken by the children of polygamist Winston Blackmore, who were fascinated with Tribune photographer Trent Nelson’s cameras. Their play on a summer day at their home in Lister, British Columbia is easily comparable to a school recess that starts in the morning and doesn’t end until it’s time for bed. Dozens of brothers and sisters join for water fights, jumping on trampolines and riding bikes through the green grass and tall trees of the family’s farm.

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From the New York Times:

Mr. Newman photographed so many of the world’s most prominent and accomplished men and women that it sometimes seemed as if there was no public figure that his lens had left untouched. But there were subjects he generally steered clear of: actors, actresses, rock stars and anyone he considered, as he put it, “famous for being famous.”

“I hate the whole idea of celebrity,” he said.

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From Fat Wreck Chords:

Streaming and downloadable sampler, featuring Against Me!, Dead to Me, Good Riddance, Lagwagon, The Lawrence Arms, The Loved Ones, Love Equals Death, Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, NOFX, None More Black, Only Crime, Randy, The Sainte Catherines, Strike Anywhere.

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From the Digital Journalist:

For a more perceptive and profound patriotism immerse yourself in Burk Uzzle’s latest book, A Family Named Spot. Here you will find some of the eccentricities and idiosyncrasies that make this country great, all displayed unabashedly and without apology or sentimentality. They are also portrayed without disdain but with great affection. On the lid of his camera case Uzzle has inscribed the words “Celebrate, don’t incriminate,” which is an indication of his affinity with his subjects, whether they are people or landscapes.

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Mario Ruiz, from the Digital Journalist:

I was told I would have five days in Iridimi. We would arrive by plane via a United Nations cargo jet on Monday and leave Friday morning, giving me only four days to shoot at the camps. I had no idea whether that would be enough time to get what I needed. With the amount of pressure I placed myself under it would prove to be enough time.

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Christoph Bangert, from the Digital Journalist:

There are maybe eight or nine foreign photographers still trying to cover this conflict from the civilian side. I am by far not the bravest, most committed, talented nor longest-serving of these photographers; I am just one of them. The majority of the pictures that are coming out of this country are taken by Iraqi photographers working for wire services or foreigners who are exclusively embedded with the military. Of course, I am one of them and am sometimes embedded with either the American, British or Iraqi military and so are most of my colleagues.

I used to be the only blond guy in Baghdad. Well, at least that’s what I felt like. Now I am the only blond guy in Baghdad that dyed his hair black. I look like a fool and maybe I am one. Maybe it’s foolish to be here and tell oneself that it is important to do so. Maybe it actually makes sense.

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From The Online Photographer:

For his limited-edition Leica, Ralph Gibson chose the MP, but with the angled rewind crank; 35, 50, and 90mm framelines, each visible singly in the finder; matte black finish to be “less conspicuous” but then some notably conspicuous red leather; and he eliminated the preview lever. (And note the absence of the ever-controversial red dot.) It’s pleasing that for the $5,500 it costs (which doesn’t cover the 50mm Apo-ASPH. lens he favors) it does include the braided leather lanyard camera strap of the type Ralph has always used.
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With a photo by Edward Keating (is he back with NYT?), from the New York Times Magazine:

Late one afternoon in February 1978, according to sworn testimony, a squad of revolutionary guards arrived at the home of Edgegayehu Taye, a 22-year-old civil servant. They told her she was wanted for questioning. She went without protest. The guards pushed her into the back seat of a Volkswagen and drove her some distance, until the car reached a corrugated metal gate marked by a sign that read: “Higher Zone 9.” The guards took her into the main office. Edgegayehu was ordered to strip naked and was bound with rope at her wrists and knees. Then the guards ran a pole through the loops in the rope and hung her between two desks, like a pig on a spit. They lashed her with plastic cables.

Over and over again, the man behind the desk, the one with the afro, asked her, “Are you a member of the E.P.R.P.?”

Years later, when she saw the man standing by the elevator at the Colony Square Hotel, Edgegayehu wasn’t sure it was Kelbessa at first. He’d gotten older, gained some weight, lost his swagger. He certainly didn’t seem to recognize her. Then Kelbessa smiled widely and greeted her, and she knew for sure. “The voice,” she told me. “You don’t forget the voice.”

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From the Daily Sun, Nigeria’s King of the Tabloids:

To signpost the wicked world she was being brought into, first, Kehinde lost her twin sister two days after birth. Three weeks later, she lost an arm owing to alleged staff negligence at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan. And worse still, her parents are HIV positive.

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From the New York Times:

“He’s strong, and he doesn’t waver,” said Jaren Olsen, 18, a freshman at Brigham Young, the nation’s largest religiously affiliated private university, who is from Albany. “I like that he is for the family, that marriage should only be between a man and woman. And the war, we need to finish what we started.”

Another student at Brigham Young, Danielle Pulsipher, a junior, offered blanket approval of the president. Asked to name which of his actions as president she liked most, she was hard-pressed to answer.

“I’m not sure of anything he’s done, but I like that he’s religious — that’s really important,” Ms. Pulsipher said.

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