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From the Daily Sun, Nigeria’s King of the Tabloids:

Temitope Kolaru
No! Take a good look at me. Do I look like somebody who would go into a relationship with a man who has been there two previous times? A two-time divorcee? I mean, not even a second-hand man, a third-hand man for that matter. My brother, no way o! I can’t do it. Men can no longer be trusted. To marry such a man, one would invariably be digging her grave.

Here.

From The New York Times:

Rather than linking talks to one arrest, the European Union should ask if a deeply brutalized society like Serbia’s is a worthy partner for integration, regardless of the disposition of any one war criminal. Making General Mladic a totem for what Europe really needs — Serbia’s transformation — stunts the union’s ability to understand and encourage that process.

Fixation on General Mladic is of a piece with the naïve thinking behind much Western foreign policy from the Balkans to Baghdad. Similarly optimistic claims were made when former President Slobodan Milosevic was arrested, but five years later, Serbia’s politics still haven’t advanced enough. Oh — maybe that’s because we haven’t gotten General Mladic.

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Photo Essay by Trent Parke, from Magnum Photos:

A journey of 90,000km around Australia; Parke’s attempt to find his place within an Australia vastly different from the one in which he grew up.

Latrobe Regional Art Gallery, Victoria, Australia 20 May to 24 June 2006

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From PunkNews:

Descendents will be launching their own signature Vans shoe on June 1st, 2006. The long-running and influential hardcore/pop-punk act is currently on hiatus while members work as producers, scientists and even the backup band for the Lemonheads.
Here.

From Wooster Collective:

I went to the Independent Arts festival in Belgium and hooked up with M-City from near Gdansk, Poland… they had HUNDREDS of HUGE stencils and made a bunch of incredible pieces there, before they drove off to paint Berlin… I was astonished at how good they were and at how much work they put into what they do… Really really impressed.. and we also had a manic session on Polish vodka and did some painting together and swapped artwork… life is sweet…”

Here.

From the BBC:

David Lucas, of Mildenhall, Suffolk, said he had been selling execution equipment to countries including Zimbabwe for about 10 years.

Amnesty said the export of gallows, which will be made illegal by an EC regulation in July, was “appalling”.

But Mr Lucas said the trade was not sick and “business is business”.

He added some people deserved the death penalty.

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From the Daily Sun, Nigeria’s King of the Tabloids:

Timothy, who gained entry into the house at about 10am, was said to have thrown one of his crutches into the compound and used the other one to leap over the fence.
Having succeeded in jumping into the compound, the suspect allegedly broke the bulglary proof in one of the windows with a stick and gained access into the Oluwa’s sitting room.

As he was ransacking the house for money and other valuables, he heard a noise outside the compound. Suspecting that the owners of the house had returned, ended his operation abruptly and limped out of the house. Outside a crowd was waiting for him.

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From the Daily Sun, Nigeria’s King of the Tabloids:

Asked about how the tongue was chopped off, Abdul explained that it was possible that the nails of Paulina did the damage while she was struggling to pull out her fingers from Chinyere’s mouth.
“The tongue is a soft tissue. It could have been chopped off by Paulina’s nails. Chinyere herself could have unconsciously chopped off her tongue when Paulina slapped her in the face. But definitely, there was no evidence either from the two ladies or eye-witnesses that Paulina chopped off the tongue.

“They were not kissing each other and the tongue can never allow itself to be chopped off carelessly like that”, the 2 Division PRO said.
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From SportsShooter:

This is video of the judging panel in action. Wally Skalij (Los Angeles Times), Myung Chun (Los Angeles Times), Matt A. Brown (Los Angeles freelance photographer), Rick Rickman (freelance photographer and Brooks Institute faculty member) and Robert Hanashiro (USA TODAY), spent the day together working to decide the winners in five categories and select a “Picture of the Year” for the (best entry).

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From Rob Galbraith:

The latest release of the pro photo browser from Camera Bits adds uploading to a PhotoShelter account from within the application, viewing and processing of RAW files (Mac version only; OS X 10.4.6 required), more flexible CD/DVD writing, the ability to read code replacement data out of multiple text files, several new variables (includes one that returns a camera’s total shutter actuations) and many other improvements and fixes.
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Folks, it’s finally happening. NoTxt Magazine is open for business.

NoTxt is an online outlet for visual artists of all stripes, and intends to showcase the best work out there from photographers, designers, illustrators, pranksters, cel phone cams, web artists, graffiti, stickers, etc.

Submissions of all styles are being accepted now for our debut issue, deadline for the first issue, coming in June, is May 25.

A little more information at www.notxt.org. Come around and show us what you got. Free to submit, free to be published, free exposure if you make it in.
Editors: Trent Nelson, Grayson West.

From the BBC:

Mr Zuma remained composed as he answered journalists’ questions.

But he became visibly upset when a journalist challenged him on his admission made in court and widely reported in the media, that he had showered after sex to reduce the risk of HIV infection.

“If you’ve been in the kitchen, my dear, peeling onions, you wash your hands afterwards,” he said.

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From the BBC:

“Every corner of the city, the militias of the same rival groups have taken up positions to prepare for more lethal fighting… there is no cold place in an inferno.”

The Islamic courts have restored order to some parts of the city by providing justice under Sharia – Islamic law.

The alliance of warlords recently created the Alliance for the Restoration of Peace and Counter-Terrorism.

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From the BBC:

Hand-picked by the festival’s organiser, veteran Ukrainian rocker and cultural patriot Oleg Skrypka, they had to fulfil three festival conditions:

•    To sing professionally and live (ie – not miming)

•    To play rock, hip-hop or anything other than pop

•    To sing in Ukrainian.

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From The New York Times:

“Janjaweed, janjaweed!” the crowd shouted, grasping at a Sudanese man who works for Oxfam, the British aid organization, as he tried to flee the melee in a car. They were using the local term for the Arab militias who have aligned with the government and carried out brutal attacks on non-Arab villages across the vast arid, countryside of Darfur, a region the in western Sudan the size of France.

The anger in the swirling crowd was palpable when they set upon the aid worker, a Sudanese man who has been working as a primary health coordinator for Oxfam for many years. One young man wielded a knife that came so near the worker’s flesh it sheared his shirt. Women tugged at his legs. Boys in filthy white robes wielding sticks and rocks smashed the windows of the United Nations car in which he was trying to get away.

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From The Digital Journalist (link to gallery at bottom of page):

Rick Loomis says that survival skills he learned as a boy in Loxahatchee help him at the front. Zucchino observed that, “Raised in rural south Florida, Loomis is comfortable around guns, knives, fast cars and motorcycles. In other words, he’s part redneck. On a grueling three-week mission with a U.S. Special Forces team last winter, Loomis not only showed the Green Berets how to ford a river in a four-wheel-drive vehicle, he also beat them hands-down in an improvised distance-jumping contest with the soldiers’ own dirt bike.”
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From The Digital Journalist (link to gallery at bottom of page):

Ken Light, who teaches photography at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, has five previous documentary books to his credit and also produced Witness In Our Time: Working Lives of Documentary Photographers (Smithsonian Press, October 2000). He prefers photographing with the medium format (but used 35mm for his book Texas Death Row, where he wanted the discretion and high film speed it allows). For Coal Hollow he used Mamiya 6s, a rangefinder camera with a 6 x 6 cm negative that handles like a Leica. Although working with an eye-level viewfinder, he often gets low with the camera, going eye-to-eye with a short dog or looking up at faces. His close-to-the-face portraits leave us no doubt that many of these people have had hard, damaging lives without decent medical care. All of the 82 duotones are full-square, and nearly fill their 11-inch square pages, allowing full appreciation of their rich tonality and detail. Some believe the square format is a difficult working space – the frame lacks a dominant direction, leaving a potential for static compositions. Ken is a master of the square composition and his images are alive with energy and dynamic interest. In addition to landscapes, signs, portraits, close-ups and environmentals, he records active situations including a tent revival and a wrestling match.

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Brian Sokol, from The Digital Journalist:

Twenty minutes later the calm broke when a volley of rocks and bottles began to rain down on police and protesters alike. Suddenly the air was again full of tear gas and I wiped feverishly at my eyes, trying to shoot frame after frame as figures darted in and out of the bitter fog. Protesters charged at the police screaming, “King Gyanendra is a thief, he stole our country,” and I found myself in a human pile, attempting to protect my cameras and body while being stampeded by the retreating security forces. When the air cleared, I found myself cut off from my friends.

Here.

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