join the photo community - The Click is edited by Trent

With a photo by Edward Keating (is he back with NYT?), from the New York Times Magazine:

Late one afternoon in February 1978, according to sworn testimony, a squad of revolutionary guards arrived at the home of Edgegayehu Taye, a 22-year-old civil servant. They told her she was wanted for questioning. She went without protest. The guards pushed her into the back seat of a Volkswagen and drove her some distance, until the car reached a corrugated metal gate marked by a sign that read: “Higher Zone 9.” The guards took her into the main office. Edgegayehu was ordered to strip naked and was bound with rope at her wrists and knees. Then the guards ran a pole through the loops in the rope and hung her between two desks, like a pig on a spit. They lashed her with plastic cables.

Over and over again, the man behind the desk, the one with the afro, asked her, “Are you a member of the E.P.R.P.?”

Years later, when she saw the man standing by the elevator at the Colony Square Hotel, Edgegayehu wasn’t sure it was Kelbessa at first. He’d gotten older, gained some weight, lost his swagger. He certainly didn’t seem to recognize her. Then Kelbessa smiled widely and greeted her, and she knew for sure. “The voice,” she told me. “You don’t forget the voice.”

Here.

From the Daily Sun, Nigeria’s King of the Tabloids:

To signpost the wicked world she was being brought into, first, Kehinde lost her twin sister two days after birth. Three weeks later, she lost an arm owing to alleged staff negligence at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan. And worse still, her parents are HIV positive.

Here.

From the New York Times:

“He’s strong, and he doesn’t waver,” said Jaren Olsen, 18, a freshman at Brigham Young, the nation’s largest religiously affiliated private university, who is from Albany. “I like that he is for the family, that marriage should only be between a man and woman. And the war, we need to finish what we started.”

Another student at Brigham Young, Danielle Pulsipher, a junior, offered blanket approval of the president. Asked to name which of his actions as president she liked most, she was hard-pressed to answer.

“I’m not sure of anything he’s done, but I like that he’s religious — that’s really important,” Ms. Pulsipher said.

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From Manowar:

MANOWAR – the only band to have headlined the Gods Of Metal 3 times – is proud to announce they will make their 4th headlining appearance on the 2007 edition of the festival in Italy on Saturday, June 9th.

Along with MANOWAR will be special guests RHAPSODY and HOLYHELL bringing you the Demons, Dragons & Warriors World Tour for a day that you will never ever forget!

Here.

From the New York Times:

Beachland has kept up with the times. Mr. Mancino was skeptical when video games came out, but now they dominate the place. Devotees of Dance Dance Revolution, a game of quick feet and moving arrows, have held tournaments there.

These days, though, there are not many havens left for a machine like Big Bertha, a floppy figure with orange-yarn hair, a flowered tent dress and an insatiable appetite for plastic balls. For each one thrown into her gullet she gains 25 pounds (and spits out a ticket). “I’m not on a diet, so feed me!” she called out to a boy pelting her uvula. “Faster! Feed me faster!”

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From the New York Times:

It began with an impassioned, 5,000-word letter on one of the country’s most popular Internet bulletin boards from a husband denouncing a college student he suspected of having an affair with his wife. Immediately, hundreds joined in the attack.

“Let’s use our keyboard and mouse in our hands as weapons,” one person wrote, “to chop off the heads of these adulterers, to pay for the sacrifice of the husband.”

Within days, the hundreds had grown to thousands, and then tens of thousands, with total strangers forming teams that hunted down the student, hounded him out of his university and caused his family to barricade themselves inside their home.

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From the International Crisis Group:

Ten actual or potential conflict situations around the world deteriorated in May 2006, according to the new issue of CrisisWatch,* released today. Afghanistan saw its worst violence since 2001, with  some  350 insurgents, civilians and security personnel killed across its southern provinces. There was heavy fighting in  Mogadishu, Somalia,  between the Islamic Courts militia and the U.S.-backed Alliance for the Restoration of Peace and Counter-Terrorism, leaving over 200 dead. Tensions increased in the Democratic Republic of Congo ahead of 30 July elections, and clashes in Ituri province killed 60. Security collapsed in Timor-Leste after renegade soldiers clashed with security forces. In Israel/Occupied Territories, mounting violence in Gaza fuelled by a power struggle between Fatah and Hamas loyalists raised fears of civil war. Lebanon experienced its worst cross-border fighting in six years after rockets were fired into northern Israel in apparent response to the killing of an Islamic Jihad group leader in southern Lebanon. The situation also deteriorated in Brazil, Mali, Sri Lanka and Turkey.

Here.

The Few and the Proud: Marine Corps Drill Instructors in Their Own Words

The Few And The Proud; Marine Corps Drill Instructors In Their Own Words, by Larry Smith.
[rating:4/5]

Okay, if I gave out C+ or B-, this would be there. The book contains profiles and interviews of various drill instructors from the WW2 era to today. Some of these are very interesting, and others are not.

“There was a kid, some bohunk kid from Mississippi or somplace who didn’t know his left foot from his right, kept marching badly. The drill sergeant walked over, very cordial and sweet, and said to him, ‘Are you having trouble, keeping the rhythm of the march?’ And the kid said, ‘Yes, Sergeant.’ He said, ‘Well you seem to be having trouble knowing which foot to pivot on when we’re making those fast turns.’ And the kid said, ‘That’s right, Sergeant.’ So the D.I. lifted up his foot and he slammed it down on the kid’s foot and he said, ‘Now, pivot on the one that hurts.’ I never forgot that.”

That one was from the 50s. Here’s a guy from the present day, Will Post:

“The thing that really ticked me off in Kosovo was, you know, they called this crap peacekeeping. How do we keep peace? We kill the bad guys. If you act up, we’re going to kill you. After what happened in Kosovo when the bad guys shot at my guys, I believe that 99 percent of other units would have let go and just radioed in. But I asked the Marines, I didn’t know if any of my guys were hit yet, and I asked them, Can you see them shooting? They said yes. Are they shooting at you? They yelled back to me yes. I said, ‘Kill ’em. Kill ’em.’ And that’s why we wound up doing what we did. Peacekeeping to me is horseshit. It only takes one bullet to end your war, and I’ll be damned if it’s going to happen to one of my Marines on my watch because of being restrained. And those Marines understood: My God. This ain’t peacekeeping. These people are trying to kill us. You turn your back on them for one minute, they will kill you. Damn right.”

Another bit from Will Post:

“As for Iraq, a lot of my friends, first sergeants and sergeants major are over there, and they report the Marines are just performing superbly. Nearly all Marines are chomping at the bit to get over there. You don’t hear them complaining about deployment time. This is what they came in the Marine Corps to do. They’re warriors, dealing with snipers and IEDs, Improvised Explosive Devices; I’m old school. I call them booby traps, because that’s what they are. Mostly, it’s very frustrating, but they’re doing their job wonderfully, and as usual 99.9 percent of the stuff that’s going on don’t make the papers, just the bad stuff. The people over there absolutely love them.”

The Few And The Proud; Marine Corps Drill Instructors In Their Own Words, by Larry Smith.
[rating:4/5]

From KSL:

Bill Tibbitts, Anti-Hunger Action Committee: “Extremely frustrating, very sad.”

Here.

From the Guardian:

The report also shows that in a single year checkpoints run by a warlord in a medium-size town can earn him more than $4m (£2.1m).

There, in dollars and cents, lie the reasons that Somalia has remained a byword for anarchy for so long. Chaos equals cash for those with guns.

A functioning national government, which President Abdullahi Yusuf is trying to install, would spell financial disaster for the warlords and the cartels.

Here.

Please read the comments below. They are more informative and correct than this article may have been. It seems obvious to me that the article I quoted here is not up to snuff. -Trent

From the Guardian Newspaper:

“First, I cut off your head. Then, I cleave you in two.” Eugene, my travelling companion and a fluent Japanese speaker, translated as a 450 year old samurai sword sliced a curving arc around his body, inches away from his face and chest. The words, and the sword, belonged to Hamamoto, a 70-year-old sensei and founder of the Hamamoto fighting style. The Hamamoto style, we soon discovered, is extremely violent and quite unsporting: he beckoned Eugene to kneel opposite him and encouraged him to bow. Mid-bow he suddenly unsheathed his sword and told him: “Now I take the butt of my sword and break your chin. Then I disembowel you.”

More Here.

From the Moscow Times:

No suspects had been detained as of Tuesday.

“According to witnesses, the killers were yelling, ‘Glory to Russia’ and ‘Long live Russia,'” said Simon Tsaturyan, the Sardaryan family’s lawyer.

Tsaturyan said the attackers pulled the train’s emergency lever after stabbing Sardaryan and fled the scene. Sardaryan died on the spot, Tsaturyan said.

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From the BBC:

The satellite images show the destruction of one settlement near Harare, which had contained some 850 structures before last May.

The human rights group says the photos are irrefutable evidence how entire communities were obliterated.

The UN says some 700,000 people were directly affected by the demolitions.

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From Vinyl Pulse:

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Here.

From the Guardian:

It’s another mystery for Doctor Who – where have the viewers gone?

BBC1’s Doctor Who revival has been lavished with critical praise and awards, but there are signs midway through its second series that viewers may be tiring of the time travelling sci-fi drama.

Saturday’s Doctor Who, the seventh out of 13 episodes in the second series, was the lowest-rated yet since the show returned last year to rave reviews and big audiences.

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From the New York Times:

Somehow Operation Iraqi Freedom, not a large war by America’s historical standards, has blossomed into a crisis of expectations that threatens our ability to react to future threats with a fist instead of five fingers. Instead of rallying we are squabbling, even as the slow fuse burns.

One party is overly sanguine, unwilling to acknowledge its errors. The other is overly maudlin, unable to forgive the same. The Bush administration seeks to insulate the public from the reality of war, placing its burden on the few. The press has tried to fill that gap by exposing the raw brutality of the insurgency; but it has often done so without context, leaving a clear implication that we can never win.

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From the Moscow Times:

“I punched him in the face myself because I’m a normal Russian guy,” Alexei said, grinning.

Using a widespread Russian expression, Alexei said he and others came to protest the march to “combine the pleasant things with the useful things” — hanging out with his friends while physically beating people he considers perverts.

Here.

From the New York Times:

The Somali smugglers are a ruthless lot. They charge $30 to $100 for passage, quite a bit since they pack 80 to 200 bodies into the fishing boats. And payment does not guarantee safe passage, not by a long shot.

If the seas get too rough, some passengers might be hurled overboard to lighten the load. If someone dares to stand up during the voyage, a whack with a stick or a gun butt is the inevitable punishment. Unaccompanied women might find themselves sexually molested by the crew in the dark.

But it is when the Yemeni Coast Guard appears and the boat owner risks losing his craft that things get even worse. The crew is likely to force all the passengers into the sea at gunpoint. If anyone hesitates, the crew will sometimes tie the hands of the passengers and throw them out, or simply shoot them.

Here.

From the New York Times:

Hiba Abdullah survived the killings by American troops in Haditha last Nov. 19, but said seven others at her father-in-law’s home did not. She said American troops shot and killed her husband, Rashid Abdul Hamid. They killed her father-in-law, Abdul Hamid Hassan Ali, a 77-year-old in a wheelchair, shooting him in the chest and abdomen, she said.

Her sister-in-law, Asma, “collapsed when her husband was killed in front of her eyes,” Ms. Abdullah said. As Asma fell, she dropped her 5-month-old infant. Ms. Abdullah said she picked up the baby girl and sprinted out of the house, and when she returned, Asma was dead.

Here.

From the Washington Post:

But, he (Congressman Jack Murtha) said, “I will not excuse murder, and this is what has happened,” adding that there is “no question in my mind about it.” He reiterated a previous statement that shootings of women and children occurred “in cold blood” and that there was no firefight in which civilians were killed in a crossfire, as some Marines asserted after the event.

“This is worse than Abu Ghraib,” he said, referring to the abuse of Iraqi detainees by U.S. soldiers at a prison west of Baghdad that, when revealed in spring 2004, became a major setback for the U.S. effort in Iraq.

Here.

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