Q&A: Rosem Morton, photographer and nurse on the front lines of the pandemic

Rosem Morton, a nurse for eight years, works full-time at a Baltimore hospital. When she isn’t assisting airway surgeries and distributing personal protective equipment to coworkers, she works as a freelance photojournalist and documentary photographer

ROSEM MORTON, a nurse for eight years, works full-time at a Baltimore hospital. When she isn’t assisting airway surgeries and distributing personal protective equipment to coworkers, she works as a freelance photojournalist and documentary photographer, focusing on health care, trauma, and resilience. Since the onset of the pandemic, much of her work concerns COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

Photographers on Photographers: Chen Xiangyun in conversation with Tim Soter

I chose to have a conversation about making and self-publishing photography books, because I myself am passionate about the medium and lack of discussion in the tremendous potentials of bookmaking. I think it will bring something different to the reader.

Below is a transcript of a conversation between two photobook makers, Tim Soter and Chen Xiangyun.

Conflict Photography at Home: An Interview With New Orleans’ Abdul Aziz - PhotoShelter Blog

New Orleans conflict photographer Abdul Aziz shares his experiences as a Black photographer documenting the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests and more.

As a Black photographer specializing in conflict photography, Aziz’s work has a certain intangible authenticity to it; no doubt one of the reasons his images caught my eye on Instagram. The combination of his photos and personal stories shed a bright light on the editorial gaps surrounding the current coverage of the 2020 George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Black Lives Matter protests. This media coverage in recent weeks has followed a well-known trend in photojournalism, skewing heavily toward images made by older white male photojournalists, amidst a growing discussion about the importance of hiring more Black photographers.

Q & A with Chris Shaw

Chris Shaw is a photographer based in Paris. • How is the crazy pandemic treating you? One hour a day outside allowed with a wr...

Ghetto maybe too harsh a word really, but I moved into a flat in Liverpool 8 with a girlfriend and I started photographing people and places around where we lived. I befriended people who later burgled my place —that upset me at the time, haha Now I just love them anyway! They didn’t find my cameras buried under a mound of coats near the front door but they took the TV and stereo and also a box of 200 teabags (tea: that very English thing...) But they left two single teabags out —like after being robbed you really need a cup of tea!

Q & A with Alice Christine Walker

Alice Christine Walker is a photographer based in Portland. • BA: Tell me about your photobooth pictures. How/when did you get s...

Haha! Yes, that's true. I approach the photobooth from the unique position of being the darkroom photographer and the subject. Well, mechanic/photographer...

We have no place to be 1980-1982

A newly edited and expanded edition of Jōji Hashiguchi’s seminal photobook is published this month. Here, the photographer reflects on his past, and the time he spent documenting the plight of youth in the 1980s

Jack Latham Interview: Is Conspiracy a Medium?

"The case it focuses on, saw six innocent young people all suffer memory-distrust syndrome due to coercion by the police and confess to murdering two men in Iceland of which they had no links. This was achieved by the police by enforcing a narrative onto

“The case it focuses on, saw six innocent young people all suffer memory-distrust syndrome due to coercion by the police and confess to murdering two men in Iceland of which they had no links. This was achieved by the police by enforcing a narrative onto the alleged until ultimately, they doubted their own beliefs in their memories”.

To Discover a Story - Photographs by Carolina Rapezzi | Interview by W. Scott Olsen | LensCulture

Italian photographer Carolina Repezzi unfolds the story behind this arresting portrait of a young water seller, taken in the Agbogbloshie e-waste scrapyard in Ghana

This award-winning photo was made in a hellish place that has become one of the biggest electronic waste dumps in the world. Carolina Rapezzi, an Italian-born photographer now based in London, won the single image category in the LensCulture Art Photography Awards 2019. One photograph among the many that make up her project Burning Dreams, the image is of a young woman called Rashida selling water in the Agbogbloshie scrapyard and electronic waste dump in Accra, Ghana.