A special Poynter Report: The year in media - Poynter

Today, I look back at the year in media — from the best to the worst to the odd to the inspiring and everything in between.

Good morning and welcome to a special edition of the Poynter Report. Today, I look back at the year in media — from the best to the worst to the odd to the inspiring and everything in between.
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Categorized as Journalism

Looking Forward to 2020, Here are 10 Themes for News

A human-centered design research process to understand how people use technology and what that might mean for news.

No matter where we spoke to people, certain themes continuously came up regardless of the topic we were researching. We looked at these themes through the lens of news, but they are indicative of how people consume content and use technology. We’ve collected 10 of our top themes and are sharing them below and as a downloadable packet.
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Hundreds of journalists are sharing their salary information in a spreadsheet

I’m in a private Slack with some other media/journalist people, and someone brought up the idea of pay transparency. After all: if you don’t know what your colleagues are being paid, it…

As of this writing, more than 200 people have responded. On one hand, it is admittedly difficult to verify the claims contained within the data. On the other hand, there's still lots of eye-opening information to glean. Unsurprisingly, there are pay disparities across race and gender; but the same thing happens across geographic location, and work experience. Perhaps the most shocking revelation so far is just the absurd range of income of people working in news media. There are people making $33K in Iowa, who are jealous of those living off of $52K in New York City, plus some surprising outlets that pay remarkably well. And of course, there are a few wild outliers, like the podcast producer making $400K at Vox Media (I don't know who that is, but I have my suspicions).
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After the Fall of the Glossy Magazine, What’s Left of Condé Nast?

Two years after Si Newhouse died (and Graydon Carter left), Anna Wintour and a new CEO map out the future they can afford.

What’s Left of Condé Nast Two years after Si Newhouse died (and Graydon Carter left), Anna Wintour and a new CEO map out the future they can afford.
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The Journalist vs. the President, With Life on the Line

Maria Ressa, editor of a popular news site in the Philippines, has incurred President Duterte and his supporters’ wrath by investigating his extrajudicial killing campaign.

Rappler, one of the country’s most popular media platforms, has incurred President Duterte and his supporters’ wrath by investigating his extrajudicial killing campaign.

Notebook: The Writer of the Future

by Ann Kjellberg, editor

As the monopolies grow, the possibilities for securing revenue for writing and being party to its distribution constrict. According to the Poynter Institute, jobs in journalism shrank by 23 percent between 2007 and 2018 (in print by 45 percent). Shane Bauer’s 2016 report on private prisons, which contributed to a Justice Department decision to end private prison contracts, reportedly cost $350,000 to produce and brought its publishers $5,000 in ad revenue. Observers dispute attempts to place a dollar amount on what Google and Facebook have pulled from journalism earnings, but no one disputes that Google and Facebook have grown rich advertising around journalism, and news publishers, who create the “content” and pay those who write it, are losing. Other models for funding journalism, such as philanthropy and venture capital, are coming up short as well.
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Google Made $4.7 Billion From the News Industry in 2018, Study Says

Journalists create the content, and big tech companies are profiting off it, according to a new analysis. “We need to share the revenue,” a news publisher says.

The journalists who create that content deserve a cut of that $4.7 billion, said David Chavern, the president and chief executive of the alliance, which represents more than 2,000 newspapers across the country, including The New York Times.
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‘This could ruin us’: A class-action suit imperils California freelancers

Carrie Bell likes being her own boss. A full-time freelancer for nearly 18 years, she covers entertainment and travel for outlets like Yahoo and PopSugar. Despite the rollercoaster highs and lows of working independently, freelancing agrees with her. “

Dynamex is shorthand for a class-action lawsuit in California about the employment status of delivery truck drivers. Last April, the state Supreme Court ruled unanimously that Dynamex Operations West, a package delivery company, had misclassified its drivers as independent contractors rather than employees. The ruling also covers exotic dancers, hairdressers, freelance reporters, and anyone else who works as an independent contractor (IC) in the Golden State. Heralded by labor groups as protecting the rights of vulnerable workers and confronting the abuses of the gig economy, Dynamex has also created widespread confusion about who’s exempt, who’s in trouble, and what the ruling will mean for freelancers. To say that it’s having an impact would be an understatement. People are freaking out.

The ‘Liar’s Dividend’ is dangerous for journalists. Here’s how to fight it. - Poynter

From person-to-person coaching and intensive hands-on seminars to interactive online courses and media reporting, Poynter helps journalists sharpen skills and elevate storytelling throughout their careers.

This is a bigger problem than the Oxygen Theory, which argues that by debunking a falsehood, journalists give the claim a longer life. The Liar’s Dividend suggests that in addition to fueling the flames of falsehoods, the debunking efforts actually legitimize the debate over the veracity. This creates smoke and fans suspicions among at least some in the audience that there might well be something true about the claim. That’s the “dividend” paid to the perpetrator of the lie.

Can Paul Huntsman Save The Salt Lake Tribune?

Life got complicated for this scion of a powerful Utah family when he became the publisher of a struggling newspaper.

Since buying the struggling daily from its hedge-fund ownership group for an undisclosed sum in 2016, Mr. Huntsman has sometimes found himself at odds with family members and the local establishment his ancestors helped shape. He has also been challenged by the task of keeping the paper alive at a time when small newspapers are dying out and big dailies with national followings are growing more dominant.

A hedge fund’s ‘mercenary’ strategy: Buy newspapers, slash jobs, sell the buildings

Alden Global Capital says it is saving newspapers. Records show its subsidiaries are profiting from the remnants of their demise.

But Twenty Lake Holdings is not just another commercial real estate investor. It is a subsidiary of Alden Global Capital, the New York City hedge fund that backed the purchase of and dramatic cost-cutting at more than 100 newspapers — causing more than 1,000 lost jobs.
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How Google and Facebook Strangled Their Digital Offspring

The conventional wisdom used to be that digital natives were the only journalism businesses that would thrive. But big layoffs at BuzzFeed and HuffPost show that the Web’s dominant companies can’t be trusted to build a news business on.

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The digital winter turns apocalyptic

This week, as a long-predicted collapse seemed to hit digital media, we saw a few of the tried-and-true ways managers use to explain to employees why they’re  laying them off. BuzzFeed chose the language of corporation-as-family, with founder Jonah Per

THIS WEEK, AS A LONG-PREDICTED collapse seemed to hit digital media, we saw a few of the tried-and-true ways managers use to explain to employees why they’re  laying them off.
Published
Categorized as Journalism

The digital winter turns apocalyptic

This week, as a long-predicted collapse seemed to hit digital media, we saw a few of the tried-and-true ways managers use to explain to employees why they’re  laying them off. BuzzFeed chose the language of corporation-as-family, with founder Jonah Per

THIS WEEK, AS A LONG-PREDICTED collapse seemed to hit digital media, we saw a few of the tried-and-true ways managers use to explain to employees why they’re  laying them off.
Published
Categorized as Journalism

With Foreign Bureaus Slashed, Freelancers are Filling the Void – At Their Own Risk

Freelancers – much cheaper to employ – have largely taken the place of salaried correspondents. The implications of this are very serious.

Since then, freelancers have increasingly filled the void. These include both Western journalists working in conflict zones around the world, as well as local journalists working in their own non-Western countries.
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Categorized as Journalism