PHOTO NOLA: Cathy Cone: Rewinding Forward - LENSCRATCH

This week we are sharing some of our discoveries from the PHOTO NOLA Reviews, an annual celebration of photography in New Orleans.  “I make photographs as a way to listen to my heart’s song, and then I practice like hell to sing it.” Cathy Cone Cathy Cone

Cathy Cone is a photographer and painter based in East Topsham, Vermont. Her series Rewinding Forward is an ongoing life project, representing events and personal experiences in a continuum. There’s a whimsical quality to this work, reminiscent to the photographs in her former series Hand Painted Photographs. Yet Rewinding Forward infuses a sense of foreboding, creating visual poems that contemplate the mystery and intrigue of simply being alive. An interview with the artist follows.

Afro Atlantico | By Alex Almeida

Afro Atlantico | By Alex Almeida The “AFRO ATLANTICO” series was devised from my experience in the peripheral cultures of big Brazilian cities as well as the plunge into the depths of t…

The “AFRO ATLANTICO” series was devised from my experience in the peripheral cultures of big Brazilian cities as well as the plunge into the depths of the Amazon rainforest, mostly renowned for its wildlife and vegetation, however equally vast in its human mosaic.

Heirs of the Dawn | By María Daniel Balcázar

‘Heirs of the Dawn’ by María Daniel Balcázar Purchase ‘Heirs of the Dawn’ book HERE! The ancient inhabitants of Oruro, Bolivia, named their land uru-uru, meaning the place w…

The ancient inhabitants of Oruro, Bolivia, named their land uru-uru, meaning the place where the light is born. They called themselves “beings of the dawn”. Their legacy is woven into the work of artisans, who through their art, revive the soul of the Andean and European deities and the memory of the African slaves.

The Real Places That Gave Rise to Southern Fictions

Tema Stauffer’s photographs explore how the experience of going somewhere is shaped by your expectations of what you will find.

It is this kind of heftier noun which Tema Stauffer takes for her subject in “Southern Fiction,” a visual survey of the settings that shaped the imaginations of some of the last century’s most significant Southern writers. Stauffer’s pictures are not illustrations of particular literary works or portraits of individual writers but, rather, invocations of people and places, both real and imagined. Taken together, they capture the intellectual and aesthetic challenges posed by biography, but also by geography—and specifically by the American South.

Daughters of the King | By Federica Valabrega

Daughters of the King | By Federica Valabrega Almost four years ago, I was invited for Shabbat dinner at the Garelik family in Crown Heights, a Lubavitch, Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn. I had jus…

Almost four years ago, I was invited for Shabbat dinner at the Garelik family in Crown Heights, a Lubavitch, Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn. I had just sat down at the table when Rabbi Yossi’s wife, Chani Garelik, took me aside and uttered to me a sentence straight from the Torah, “Col Cvuda Bat Melech Pnima,” which, translated, means “The pride of a Daughter of the King resides in the most secret depths of her soul.” She said to me that if I really wanted my photographs to speak about religious women, I first needed to understand this concept on my own.