Longform Podcast #398: Dean Baquet · Longform

Dean Baquet is executive editor of The New York Times. "I always tried to question what is the difference between what is truly tradition and core, and what is merely habit. A lot of stuff we think are core, are just habits. The way we write newspaper

"I always tried to question what is the difference between what is truly tradition and core, and what is merely habit. A lot of stuff we think are core, are just habits. The way we write newspaper stories, that’s not core, that’s habit. I think that’s the most important part about leading a place that’s going through dramatic change and even generational change. You’ve got to say, here’s what’s not going to change. This is core. This is who we are. Everything else is sort of up for grabs."

Matt Stuart - Candela: Photography & Cinematography masters (podcast)

00:50:28 - Street photographer Matt Stuart discusses his coverage of the 2017 Las Vegas mass shooting, the wake-up call that was a plastic bullet whizzing past…

Street photographer Matt Stuart discusses his coverage of the 2017 Las Vegas mass shooting, the wake-up call that was a plastic bullet whizzing past his head at a Hong Kong protest, how to balance creative work with work that puts food on the table, and much more.

Joining the Dots: Episode One with Ed Templeton

DJ, filmmaker and subcultural superstar Don Letts sits down with a new guest to discuss their life and work. This week, he meets legendary skateboarder and artist Ed Templeton.

Joining the Dots is a new Huck podcast. Each week DJ, filmmaker and subcultural superstar Don Letts sits down with a new guest to discuss their life and work. This week, he meets legendary skateboarder and artist Ed Templeton.

How I Became a Photojournalist: Lynsey Addario on Life on the Road

We sit down with the award-winning photographer to chat about learning to say no and living with an unpredictable schedule.

It's a new year, which means more episodes of Women Who Travel are coming your way. In 2020, we're kicking things off with a new monthly series called "How I Became...," where we'll sit down with master travelers who spend most of their lives on the road doing things those of us at our desks on a daily basis never thought possible. First up? Women Who Travel advisory board member, award-winning photojournalist, and author Lynsey Addario. We chat with her about picking up her first camera, taking less than stellar shots on her tour of South America in her early twenties, and spending her decades-long career photographing women. Delving deeper, we talk about how travel can heal the trauma of photographing war, death, and more—and how it takes years to learn to say "no" to risk.

Shooting War P3: Author Dr. Anthony Feinstein – 10 Frames Per Second

Anthony Feinstein, author of the book Shooting War, is a Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto and a neuropsychiatrist. His research and clinical work focuses on people with multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury and Conversion Disorder. War contains 18 profiles of photographers exploring their lives as filters between conflict and the general population and the effect they have on us and themselves in this endeavor. Includes such luminaries as Don McCullin, Tim Page, and Ron Haviv.

The Lensrentals Podcast Episode #11 – How David Carson Won a Pulitzer Covering Ferguson

Each week Roger Cicala, founder of Lensrentals.com, hosts conversations about the art and science of capturing images. From photography to videography, film, history, and technology, the show covers a wide range of topics to educate and inspire creators o

David Carson is a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Carson’s images are featured extensively in the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography that was awarded to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch photo staff. In 2008, his multimedia project “Reporting for Duty” won a regional Emmy award for Advanced Media – Interactivity. We talk with David about his experience covering Ferguson, and how much of his team’s previous work prepared them to better understanding the issues that were front and center. David shares his take on newsrooms that have lost photojournalist, the future of staff photographers and why they matter even in our current visual age.