Chris Hondros in New York

Africa and Asia were the settings of the photos for which Chris Hondros will be best remembered. But Brooklyn was his home.

Africa and Asia were the settings of the photos for which Chris Hondros of Getty Images will be best remembered. But Brooklyn was his home, as his friend Todd Heisler recalls.

When it turns sour – Greg Marinovich

I flinch from making too much of the deaths of journalists in conflicts, even that of friends. The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that in the same counterattack that killed Hetherington and Hondros, seven rebels had been killed as well as a doctor about to leave for work at the overwhelmed local hospital. His wife, a nurse, lost both her legs. They were unnamed.

Remembering Chris Hondros, Part I - Reading The Pictures

Tim Fadek, Spencer Platt, Nicole Tung, and Gary Fabiano share their thoughts on Chris Hondros.

I’ve often felt that being a photojournalist traveling to far away and troubled places was one of the loneliest things anyone could subject themselves to voluntarily. We know sometimes that’s required to make photographs which matter. It allows us to have empathy and compassion for the people we photograph. But I am grateful to know that this was one time Chris did not have to be alone. Knowing that he had friends by his side as he prepared for his next journey will help us move forward, processing an enormous tragedy.

Memorials Planned for Photographers Chris Hondros, Tim Hetherington (Update) | PDNPulse

The families of two photojournalists killed in a rocket attack on Misrata, Libya, on April 20 are organizing memorials. Dean Hondros, brother of photographer Chris Hondros, announced that a memorial service will take place Wednesday, April 27, at 1 pm at

The family of Tim Hetherington have created a web page, Timhetherington.org/condolences, where remembrances of their son are being posted.

War, in Life and Death

Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, who were killed last week covering the fighting in Libya, used their cameras to communicate the human suffering of war.

Tim and Chris were very different men who died because they had something in common: each thought it important to bear witness, to make images that communicated human suffering and send them out to the world.

The Chris Hondros photograph that changed me

I remember my mother pulling a picture out of our local Seattle Times newspaper for me, running large on the third page. A news picture tucked inside the paper, sitting on its own, was odd to see. It was as if the editors thought they had to get a great picture published even if it wasn’t ‘newsworthy’ for a local paper. I was blown away, I’m sure I said outloud that this picture would win a Pulitzer.

Service Held for Combat Photographers and Doctor Killed in Misurata

This is an e-mail sent this morning from C.J. Chivers to the editors at Getty Images and Vanity Fair, describing events in Benghazi, Libya, since the remains of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros arrived at the Benghazi port Thursday night. Mr. Hetherington, the conflict photographer and director of the Afghan war documentary “Restrepo,” and Mr. Hondros, one of the top war photographers of his generation, were killed Wednesday in Misurata, Libya.

RIP Chris & Tim

In lieu of flowers, the loved ones of Chris Hondros kindly request donations be made to The Chris Hondros Fund. This fund will provide scholarships for aspiring photojournalists and raise awareness of issues surrounding conflict photography. The Chris Hondros Fund c/o Christina Piaia 50 Bridge Street #414 Brooklyn, New York 11201

Journalists Killed in Libya, News Breaks on Facebook

When the first Western photojournalists covering the conflict in Libya were killed Wednesday, the world found out about it through Facebook and Twitter. Now the Facebook page of one of the photographers has become a defacto memorial for the online communi

When the first Western photojournalists covering the conflict in Libya were killed Wednesday, the world found out about it through Facebook and Twitter. Now the Facebook page of one of the photographers has become a defacto memorial for the online community to grieve his death and honor his life.

For What It's Worth

Image courtesy of Jim Bourg/Reuters Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington were killed yesterday in Misrata, Libya. I didn't know Tim. I respected his work and how he went about creating it. I did know Chris. He was a friend and...

Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington were killed yesterday in Misrata, Libya. I didn't know Tim. I respected his work and how he went about creating it. I did know Chris. He was a friend and a man I deeply admired.

Photojournalist Chris Hondros: At Work in Misurata, Libya

Oscar-nominated British film director and photographer Tim Hetherington (L) climbs from a building in Misurata on April 20, 2011. Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros walks in Misurata on April 18, 2011. Both men, 41, were killed and two other Western

Getty Images Photographer Chris Hondros, 41, was mortally wounded Wednesday in Misurata, Libya, not long after filing intimate, striking images of the fighting between rebel and government forces.

In Memory of Chris Hondros

All the war photographers I’ve ever met had that weird light about them.  They are God’s chosen ones- His angels designated to be the bearers of bad news and images of hell on earth.  What kind of maniac chooses to enter a battle unarmed?  I don’t believe they choose to do it.  I believe they are chosen.

In Memoriam | Tim Hetherington 1970-2011 Chris Hondros 1970-2011

Editor’s note: This post has been updated most recently on 1 May 2011. All the link additions can be found at the bottom of the post. The world lost Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros in Liby…

I would like to dedicate this post  to the memory of the two men and to their friends and family. My thoughts are with them at this very sad time. I can only imagine the pain felt by those who knew Tim and Chris personally.  I hope friends and family can find some solace in the fact that neither of them lived their lives in vain. Not only did both Hetherington and Hondros spend most of  their careers highlighting important issues  that would have otherwise been ignored or overlooked by the general public in countries such the UK and US, but they also practiced their craft at the very top tier of our industry to a very high standard and they were setting a mark towards which the rest of us should always strive for. Tim and Chris will be greatly missed.

Hetherington and Hondros, In Memoriam

I first met Chris while I was a sports intern at Getty last October. On the day I met him I was meeting with news editors, showing them my book. Hondros tried to quietly slipped through the office’s glass doors, but his presence was immediately known. As he entered, Sandy, the editor I was working with, excitedly said, “Look! That’s Chris Hondros, have you met him? He’s the nicest guy, just got back from Afghanistan.”

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

We were meant to be flying into Baghdad, and the flight was delayed over and over again by sandstorms. To kill time, Chris and I made a deal: He’d explain baseball to be, and I’d help him understand cricket. When he was about halfway through his disquisition on America’s favorite sport, another passenger chimed in to question his interpretation of some arcane rule. (At least, it seemed arcane to me.) Then another passenger interrupted, with a variation of his own. Pretty soon, half the plane was consumed in a heated discussion on the finer details of baseball rules.

only the good die young..

I am totally not up to this…Writing obits is not what I do…This will not be my best of anything. Yet, it is all I can do at the moment. I found out yesterday, at exactly this time by te…

I found out yesterday, at exactly this time by text message  while driving in a blinding rainstorm,  that my friend and next door neighbor Tim Hetherington had been killed in Libya along with colleague Chris Hondros. Mike Brown , who lives just upstairs and featured here with his Libya work was thankfully spared…So, two men who hang with me at home, stop by for a beer from time to time, were caught in the same mortar attack and one of them gone forever.  I did not know Chris Hondros, but was an admirer of his work. I write here only of my friend Tim.