Hundreds of Iraqi Journalists Forced Into Exile

Hundreds of Iraqi journalists have been forced into exile since the war started five years ago, Reporters without Borders announced in a report released Wednesday.

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MediaShift Idea Lab . Where's the Innovation in Business Models? | PBS

I see tremendous energy going in to breaking new ground in gathering news, telling stories, and creating community. What I don’t see is an equivalent amount of innovation occurring around the business models that will support journalism going forward. What I tend to see, over and over, is people experimenting wildly on the content side, and then falling back on the same old business model: Selling ads.

This model is dying.

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Reporter Owned By Sled Video

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Some Canadian Global news reporter thinks the bottom of a sledding hill is a great place to do his broadcast. He was wrong.

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Blogging and Newspapers, a Lesson in How Not to Brand and Market – Blog Maverick

if I were marketing for them, I would be doing everything I could to send the message that “The NY Times does not have blogs, we have Real Time Reports from the most qualified reporters in the world. Like blogs we post continuously , 24x7x365 to keep you up to speed, unlike blogs, we have the highest level of journalistic standards that we adhere to. A copy of which is available at…..” You get the picture.

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Journalism in the Hands of the Neighborhood – New York Times

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Citizen journalism has become the faddish name for the effort to encourage regular folk to use the Internet to report the news directly, but Mr. Wolfson had a point: many of the people whom his organization and an immigrant rights group, Juntos, are teaching to make video reports for streaming on the Internet are not citizens. Many are not even legal residents.

The hope, however, is that they can be journalists.

The classes are supported by a $150,000 news challenge grant from the Knight Foundation in Miami, which is donating a total of $25 million over five years “for innovative ideas using digital experiments to transform community news.”

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Peter Preston: When news is free, who pays the journalists? | Media | The Observer

Once upon a quite recent time, say a decade and a bit ago, only 3,000 or so students took university journalism and related media courses. Today you can count around 10 times that number of young people studying to inherit a green eyeshade, and there are 30 courses accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists (plus a rather substantial number which aren’t). Almost exponential expansion – except, where are the jobs?

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Paper's redesign includes why-are-you-smiling? photo feature

“Re-inventing anything is tough,” notes Andrew Analore, editor of the Freeport (Ill.) Journal-Standard. But the GateHouse paper’s staff has tried. Page one includes a picture of a local person who is asked why he or she is smiling. “One idea we borrowed, a Sunday ‘Brag Book’ of reader-submitted baby photos, has proved to be a huge hit with readers,” writes Analore.
Posted at 4:25:31 PM

Check it out here. Via Romenesko

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AP Chief: Press Freedoms Among Casualties of Terrorist Attacks

The shadow of the Sept. 11 terror attacks is eclipsing press freedom and other constitutional safeguards in the United States, Associated Press President and CEO Tom Curley said Thursday.

“What has become clear in the aftermath of 9/11 is how much expediency trumps safeguards,” Curley said in remarks prepared for the annual dinner of the Radio and Television News Directors Foundation.

“Congress steps back from its constitutional role of executive oversight. Civilian oversight of the military wanes. A Justice Department interprets laws in ways that extend police powers. More drastically, prisons are established in places where government or military operatives circumvent due process or control trials,” Curley said in accepting the foundation’s First Amendment Leadership Award.

“It’s at moments like these when a free press matters most,” he said.

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Esquire Publishes a Diary That Isn’t – New York Times

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After Heath Ledger was found dead in his SoHo apartment on Jan. 22, David Granger, the editor in chief of Esquire magazine, dispatched a writer named Lisa Taddeo to report on the actor’s final days.
Her article, published in the April issue, which will be on newstands next week, finds Mr. Ledger eating Moroccan food with Jack Nicholson in London, returning to New York and partying at the downtown nightspot Beatrice Inn, eating steak and eggs at a cafe in Little Italy and wolfing down a banana-nut muffin as his last morsel of food.

None of this is exactly true. “The Last Days of Heath Ledger,” written in the first person as if it were Mr. Ledger’s own diary, is a fictionalized account of his last days in London and New York and ponders the indignities of celebrity.

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News – Newspaper is 7-year-old's labor of love – sacbee.com

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As newspapers struggle with changing times, one young Davis entrepreneur has cast his lot with the printed word.

Finnegan O’Toole Boire founded his own paper in September. He writes, takes photos, sells ads and handles printing and circulation.

“I’m the editor-in-chief,” he said. “I’m also the delivery boy. I do pretty much everything all by myself.”

Finn is 7 years old. His paper is called The Weekly Block and covers his own small part of the world in central Davis.

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TED | TEDBlog: Alisa Miller on the end of global news

Alisa Miller of Public Radio International just gave an amazing short presentation on why, every year, we get less and less information about the world around us through the media — even though we want and need it more than ever.

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Handicapping The Pulitzers: Walter Reed? Virginia Tech? China? And Likely Some Surprises

A review of some of the preliminary awards, which often foretell Pulitzer success, as well as interviews with editors and current and former jurors, indicates some frontrunners have emerged.

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Saturday Is Last Day For Albuquerque Journal- PDNPulse

The Albuquerque Tribune announced today that it will cease operations, publishing its final edition this Saturday. In 2005, PDN named the Tribune one of the best newspapers to shoot for.

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AngryJournalist.com – Why are you angry today?

Pointless job in a failing industry led by ignorant people with no creativity. And photographers, who are all stuck-up, selfish bitches who think they are better than everyone else.

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A Young Life Hangs in the Balance in Afghanistan's Cultural War – washingtonpost.com

While trolling the Internet last October, Afghan journalism student Sayed Perwiz Kambakhsh came across some articles that questioned the limits of women’s rights under Islam. According to Afghan prosecutors, he downloaded the articles and circulated them on campus.

In the West, it would have been an innocent act. In Afghanistan, it has just earned him a death sentence.

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Rick Selvin dies, was writer, editor at Daily News | Philadelphia Daily News | 02/14/2008

Rick Selvin arrived at the Daily News in 1980 to apply for a job. When he got to then-managing editor Zack Stalberg’s office, he hesitated at the door.

“I’m really sorry,” Rick said.

“What are you sorry about?” Zack inquired.

“Well, I usually wear a necktie to these interviews,” Rick said, “but my tie was frozen in the trunk of my car when it got wet and when I tried to put it on, it broke.”

Zack, recognizing a guy who would surely become a true Daily News character, hired him on the spot.

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The 'Inside' Story On A Mutiny In Iraq

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Kelly Kennedy and photographer Rick Kozak had gone out on a patrol earlier that morning in Adhamiyah, one of Baghdad’s worst neighborhoods before the troop “surge,” and were supposed to go on that second one during which the IED detonated — but at the last moment decided to stay and do some interviews on base. In the aftermath of the deaths that day, Kennedy and Kozak were asked to stand away, to give the soldiers privacy to deal with their anger and grief.

One soldier she interviewed months later confessed that he’d “locked and loaded on me, had me in his sights,” she says. “He was bawling as he told me this. He’s a kid, and thought we’d sensationalize the story. That he’d considered hurting me really upset him, and he wanted to apologize about it.” In a story she posted the day after the bombing, Kennedy wrote that “this day showed why soldiers come back home with mental health issues, and why there should be no stigma attached to seeking help for those issues.”

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87 Journalists Killed on the Job in 2007, China Leads in Jailing Them

Iraq was the deadliest place for journalists last year, while China led the rest of the world in jailing members of the news media and cracking down on freedom of expression, a media rights group reports.

Russia and Iran also took significant steps to muzzle the media, the Paris-based Reporters Without Borders said.

All told, 87 journalists were killed on the job in 2007.

“More and more journalists are being killed and last year’s figure was the highest since 1994,” said the report.

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Denmark Police Arrest Several in Cartoonist Plot

Danish police said Tuesday they have arrested several people suspected of plotting to kill one of the 12 cartoonists behind the Prophet Muhammad drawings that sparked a deadly uproar in the Muslim world two years ago.

The arrests were made in pre-dawn raids in Aarhus, western Denmark, “to prevent a terror-related murder,” the police intelligence agency said. It did not say how many people were arrested nor did it mention which cartoonist was targeted.

However, according to Jyllands-Posten, the Danish newspaper that first published the drawings on Sept. 30, 2005, the suspects were planning to kill its cartoonist Kurt Westergaard. It said those arrested included both Danish and foreign citizens.

“There were very concrete murder plans against Kurt Westergaard,” said Carsten Juste, the paper’s editor-in-chief.

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An Industry Imperiled by Falling Profits and Shrinking Ads – New York Times

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The talk of newspapers’ demise is older than some of the reporters who write about it, but what is happening now is something new, something more serious than anyone has experienced in generations. Last year started badly and ended worse, with shrinking profits and tumbling stock prices, and 2008 is shaping up as more of the same, prompting louder talk about a dark turning point.

“I’m an optimist, but it is very hard to be positive about what’s going on,” said Brian P. Tierney, publisher of The Philadelphia Inquirer and The Philadelphia Daily News. “The next few years are transitional, and I think some papers aren’t going to make it.”

Advertising, the source of more than 80 percent of newspaper revenue, traditionally rose and fell with the overall economy. But in the last 12 to 18 months, that link has been broken, and executives do not expect to be able to repair it completely anytime soon.

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