Sebastião Salgado’s Journey From Brazil to the World

In a wide-ranging interview, Sebastião Salgado discusses a new documentary that tracks his path from childhood in Brazil to witnessing some of the greatest stories of his age.

Listen, I am not a social photographer. I am not an economic photographer. I’m not a photojournalist. Photography is much more than that. Photography is my life. It’s my way of life, and my language. I went to photograph the things that I had a great curiosity to see and to organize. I felt a certain revulsion, and a compulsion to show that others also have dignity, that dignity is not an exclusive property of the rich countries of the north but exists all over the planet. That’s what photography was for me, my language, my life and my way of going about and doing things

Epiphany on a Kosovo Rooftop

Fred R. Conrad may be best known for his exquisite portraits, but an assignment in Kosovo taught him the value of watching and waiting for the story to come to him.

Kathy Ryan, the director of photography for The New York Times Magazine, sent me to Kosovo in June of 1999 to take a panoramic picture of a burned-out street that would be published over four pages. There was one proviso: Whatever ruins I decided to photograph had to reveal the horrors that had been inflicted upon its occupants.

Best of 2014 · Longform

We recommended 1,642 articles this year, from 1,364 writers and 417 publishers. Collectively, they were read over 10 million times. These are our favorites. You can read every article on this list in the totally free Longform App. Download it today.

We recommended 1,642 articles this year, from 1,364 writers and 417 publishers. Collectively, they were read over 10 million times. These are our favorites

2014: The Year in Photos, September-December

Part three of a three-part photo summary of the year: severe drought in California, Hong Kong's Umbrella Movement protests, raging battles and U.S. airstrikes against ISIS targets in Syria, victories for same-sex marriage proponents in the U.S.

As the year comes to a close, it's time to take a look back at some of the most memorable events and images of 2014, a particularly brutal year. Among the events covered in this essay (the last of a three-part photo summary of the year): severe drought in California, Hong Kong's Umbrella Movement protests, raging battles and U.S. airstrikes against ISIS targets in Syria, victories for same-sex marriage proponents in the U.S., the successful test launch of NASA's new Orion spacecraft, and crash of Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo. Be sure to see part 1 and part 2 posted earlier. The series comprises 120 images in all. Warning, some of the photos may contain graphic or objectionable content. [40 photos]

2014: The Year in Photos, May-August

Part two of a three-part photo summary of the year: Summer rioting in Ferguson, Missouri, the World Cup in Brazil, the flight of the Yazidis from ISIS in Iraq, the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, and the Israel-G

As the year comes to a close, it's time to take a look back at some of the most memorable events and images of 2014, a particularly brutal year. Among the events covered in this essay (the second of a three-part photo summary of the year): Summer rioting in Ferguson, Missouri, the World Cup in Brazil, the flight of the Yazidis from ISIS in Iraq, the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, and the Israel-Gaza conflict. Come back for part 3 tomorrow, and be sure to see part 1 posted yesterday. The series will total 120 images in all. Warning, some of the photos may contain graphic or objectionable content. [40 photos]

2014: The Year in Photos, January-April

Part one of a three-part photo summary of the year: Protests that drove Ukraine's President Viktor Yanukovych from office, the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, Ellen DeGeneres' much-retweeted selfie from the Oscars, and the ongoing and brutal sit

As the year comes to a close, it's time to take a look back at some of the most memorable events and images of 2014. Among the events covered in this essay (the first of a three-part photo summary of the year): Protests that drove Ukraine's President Viktor Yanukovych from office, the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, multiple protests worldwide, Ellen DeGeneres' much-retweeted selfie from the Oscars, the ongoing and brutal situation in war-torn Syria, the opening of the largest solar thermal power-tower system in the world, and a playful rocket battle in Vrontados, Greece. Come back for part 2 tomorrow, and part 3 on Wednesday. The series will total 120 images in all. Warning, some of the photos may contain graphic or objectionable content. [40 photos]

Lucas Foglia's Sweeping Photos of the American West in the Midst of a Mining Boom - Feature Shoot

Moving Cattle to Spring Pasture, Boulder, Wyoming 2011 Tommy Trying to Shoot Coyotes, Big Springs Ranch, Oasis, Nevada 2012 Frontcountry is Lucas Foglia‘s exploration of the American West, where human…

Frontcountry is Lucas Foglia‘s exploration of the American West, where human figures are swallowed up by an endless horizon and everyday life swells with raw wildness. Foglia spent 7 years traveling through the expanse that is rural Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Wyoming

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

To celebrate James Nachtwey’s 30 years as a contract photographer for TIME, we have organized an exhibit of 54 layouts that have appeared in the magazine featuring his work from Chechnya to Somalia and from Afghanistan to Burma, along with a series of his powerful, previously unpublished photographs. Below, James Nachtwey, and TIME’s Managing Editor Nancy Gibbs, reflect on the relationship between photographer and publication.

Stephen Wilkes: Time Machine — zPhotoJournal

I see a lot out there and what I see is people who have talent and work hard…or think they work hard…but the priority they need to get to that special place is going to escape them. They don’t understand that the level of passion and drive that you have to have to be really successful in this business today is amplified. Everybody has a camera and it’s incredible who you’re competing with. So my advice is something Jay Maisel once told me, “You gotta eat, sleep, breathe and drink it. And if you don’t do that, find something else to do!” 

The War Photo No One Would Publish

When Kenneth Jarecke photographed an Iraqi man burned alive, he thought it would change the way Americans saw the Gulf War. But the media wouldn’t run the picture.

When Kenneth Jarecke photographed an Iraqi man burned alive, he thought it would change the way Americans saw the Gulf War. But the media wouldn’t run the picture.

The Last Sentimentalist: A Q. & A. with Duane Michals

Michals talks to Siobhan Bohnacker about his early work, and about his dream-like portraits of Marcel Duchamp, René Magritte, and Andy Warhol.

The photographer Duane Michals is perhaps best known for his “fictionettes”: dream-like stagings in which Marcel Duchamp, René Magritte, and Andy Warhol have all appeared. These enchanting photo sequences and montages, which are often accompanied by Michals’s handwritten prose, make innovative use of the medium’s ability to suggest what cannot be seen

Christine Osinski: Shoppers, Chicago, and Swimmers 1980-1996

When I first encountered Christine Osinski's Staten Island work at Photo Nola last year it was love at first sight and I featured it on Lenscratch. As I shared in Monday's post, not only did Christine go on to win a spot in the 2013 Critical Mass Top 50,

I believe that good work will eventually find a place in the world, regardless of how long it takes to find its way. It’s most important for photographers to continue to take pictures, regardless of the attention or lack of attention that the work initially receives. I get great pleasure from being a working artist, day in and day out. By continuing to work consistently, I feel I will be ready should opportunity knock.

Q&A: Robert Nickelsberg on a Distant War

In his new book, Afghanistan: A Distant War, veteran photojournalist Robert Nickelsberg offers a vivid close-up of the past quarter-century of Afghan history. As a photographer for Time Magazine, Nickelsberg first observed Afghanistan emerge from an eight-year war against the Soviet Union and then descend into a brutal civil war followed by a Taliban takeover. Since 2001, he’s continued going back to chronicle what he calls America’s War. He has documented things many Afghans themselves never experienced firsthand, and earned an unusually deep understanding of this complex country.

Dominic Nahr Is a Master of Photographing Human Eeriness

I interviewed him about life in Eastern Africa and nuclear exclusion zones.

For this round of VICE Loves Magnum we spoke to Dominic Nahr, who – unlike previous interviewees – is still running the gauntlet of selection before becoming a full Magnum member. We discussed Africa's endless potential for stories, the eeriness of post-tsunami Japan and how a feeling of homelessness can be conducive to taking amazing photos.