Context Matters When Viewing COVID-19 Photos - PhotoShelter Blog

Since mid-March, various policies have been implemented at the state and federal level in the U.S. to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19. Photojournalists initially covered long lines at big box stores then vanishin

Insofar as photojournalism is concerned, the best photos of the crisis avoid using photography as “facile ‘signifiers'” a term that Fred Ritchin, Dean Emeritus of the International Center of Photography School, used in a recent CJR article. Ritchin bemoans the use of images of a discarded mask or the early use of Chinese people as symbols of the outbreak, rather than “coverage” that advances photography as a way to understand a story.

My job was to cover the coronavirus pandemic, until I became part of it

I know how to prepare for a disaster.My first job as a photojournalist was in Florida, where on top of weathering hurricanes, I covered them. When the

My first job as a photojournalist was in Florida, where on top of weathering hurricanes, I covered them. When the coronavirus began to get close to the United States, I thought I was ready. I had food, medicine and first-aid kits to get me through. But nothing could have prepared me for the pandemic we’re now experiencing, including my own positive COVID-19 test.

Getting creative about funding and engaging audiences on under-reported stories.

Sean Gallagher, a British photographer who’s been based in China since 2006, has a policy that he works on one larger story every year…

“It’s difficult to say, ‘I want to change X number of minds on this issue or make a certain group of people think differently about an issue…I just think about making good work on issues that I’m interested in and then trying to get that work in publications that have a big audience. At the end of the day, if that’s happening, I have a small part in adding to the rising media dialogue about global environmental issues.”

Photojournalists Publish Guidelines for Editors During COVID-19 Crisis

Certain genres of photography have come to a screeching halt during the coronavirus pandemic, but there are still countless photographers on the front

Juntos Photo Coop, made up of photographers Noemí González, Laura Saunders, Ash Ponders, and Caitlin O’Hara, has published an open letter to seek “an equitable industry and a set of baseline standards that will improve safety and ensure dignity for all journalists risking their health to document the current COVID-19 pandemic.”

FotoEvidence — The First Decade

Alison Stieven-Taylor

Ten years ago, Bulgarian photojournalist Svetlana Bachevanova invested her savings to launch FotoEvidence, then a web platform and photobook award competition dedicated to promoting photographic stories of social inequality. Twenty-seven printed books and seven digital monographs later, FotoEvidence has evolved as the only publishing imprint solely for stories about social injustice and human rights abuses.

'Trailblazers of Light' Recognizes the Pioneering Women of Photojournalism

Trailblazers of Light is a website that recognizes the pioneering women who made a mark in the field of photojournalism during the days of film

The site was started by Yunghi Kim, a Special Contributor to Contact Press Images who has been active since 1984, who was bothered by what she saw as a revisionist narrative and inaccurate portrayals of women in the industry over the past few years.

New Members Join American Reportage - americanreportage

Rod Lamkey, Kim Raff, Julia Rendleman, Jeremy Wade Shockley and Nima Taradji join American Reportage to join in our mission of documenting the American experience.

Photographers Rod Lamkey, Kim Raff, Julia Rendleman, Jeremy Wade Shockley and Nima Taradji join American Reportage to continue in our mission of documenting the American experience.

Photographing Impeachment Proceedings Against Three Presidents

David Burnett, whose images from the Watergate hearings and Clinton impeachment have become iconic, will be on hand as the Senate decides the fate of Donald Trump.

For more than half a century, David Burnett has been photographing impeachments, wars, revolutions, Olympic Games, and artists, making himself one of the stars of his field. He got his start around the time of the moon landing, when he had the idea to take pictures of the people watching that historic event. A couple of years later he was in Vietnam, where he was present when the Associated Press’s Nick Ut took a legendary photograph of a nine-year-old girl covered in napalm. Burnett gained wider renown several years later for his work in Iran during and after the Revolution. Since that time, he has shot numerous sporting events, and compiled a book about the reggae star Bob Marley.

Life and the big picture

Editor’s note: For decades last century, American magazines used beautiful imagery and brave, honest writing to introduce readers to whole new worlds. They invented a visual language, and gave voice to people we’d otherwise never have heard from or see

Editor’s note: For decades last century, American magazines used beautiful imagery and brave, honest writing to introduce readers to whole new worlds. They invented a visual language, and gave voice to people we’d otherwise never have heard from or seen. This series seeks to celebrate the most interesting examples, and examine the ways they shaped a nation.

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Women of the "Silent Generation" who paved the way. A tribute to and acknowledgment of the accomplishments of women photojournalists of the film era, through the decades, before the adoption of digital photography..

This site has been developed to acknowledge the accomplishments of women photojournalists during the film era, decades before the advent of digital cameras. Also referred to as “The Silent Generation,” it refers to a time when a few courageous women first entered the photojournalism work force and simply did the work without fanfare but with steely determination. They worked side by side with men on a daily basis at newspapers, magazines, wire services, and photo agencies. They reported from foreign war zones, the streets of our towns and cities across America, and everywhere in between. A generation of courageous and fearless women who embraced all that came with the job. For many the work came first.

The expanded ambiguity of the news photograph

"This is not to say that news images have no obligation to tell the truth, or no informational value — only that their truthfulness and informational value are necessarily situated and contingent rather than absolute."

“This is not to say that news images have no obligation to tell the truth, or no informational value — only that their truthfulness and informational value are necessarily situated and contingent rather than absolute.”

The Most Powerful Moments in Photojournalism in 2019

Photojournalists are tasked with creating unforgettable images that make an immediate impact and provide crucial visual context.

Each year, more and more people are able to tune into major world events from their own homes. Photojournalists are tasked with creating unforgettable images that make an immediate impact, provide crucial visual context, and remain as unbiased as possible. Photographs are often our first and longest impression of a news event—we see the image before the headline as we scan our social media feeds, and images can be disseminated faster than journalists can write. Long after we’ve forgotten the details of a particular feature, the feeling of a powerful image remains.

Using His Camera as a Witness and Weapon

Shahidul Alam, the acclaimed Bangladeshi photojournalist and activist, pushes against the limits of his medium to cast light on what is suppressed or has vanished.

Like Woody Guthrie, who called his guitar an anti-fascist weapon, the Bangladeshi photographer Shahidul Alam has used his camera for 35 years as a tool to advance social justice. He began by documenting street protests in Dhaka, the capital, in the mid-80s, making pictures in the tradition of the Magnum photographers, especially Henri Cartier-Bresson. But over time, he pushed against the natural constraints of a medium that registers what is seen, so that he might illuminate what is suppressed or has vanished.