Bill Cunningham Was So Alive

You wanted to pull yourself together the minute you saw the fashion photographer’s skinny frame, because here was your chance to show love to someone who lived to discover what you had made of yourself.

This essay is adapted from the preface to “Fashion Climbing,” a posthumous memoir by the New York Times fashion photographer Bill Cunningham, to be published in September, by Penguin.

On the Street with Bill Cunningham

The main thing I love about street photography is that you find the answers you don’t see at the fashion shows. You find information for readers so they can visualize themselves. This was something I realized early on: If you just cover the designers in t

I’m reminded of the loss of Bill Cunningham every Sunday when I read the Style section of the New York Times; I miss his dogged investigation of fashion on the streets of New York. Years ago, when I was a fashion editor, I’d see Bill on a regular basis, camera strung around his neck as he peddled his bike through Manhattan traffic. I have to admit that we all secretly hoped Bill would turn his lens our direction, and the most wounding moments during fashion week was when Bill would lower his camera upon seeing an outfit that didn’t interest him.

Captured by the Lens of Bill Cunningham

Whether you were photographed just once by Bill Cunningham, or hundreds of times like favored subjects Anna Wintour, Iris Apfel and Alexandra Lebenthal, it was an experience not to be forgotten. Here, some memories from people who found themselves of the

Whether you were photographed just once by Bill Cunningham, or hundreds of times like his favored subjects Anna Wintour, Iris Apfel and Alexandra Lebenthal, it was an experience not to be forgotten. Here, some memories from people who found themselves of the other side of the lens from Mr. Cunningham. (Interviews have been edited and condensed.)

Working With Bill Cunningham

His colleagues remember.

John Kurdewan “He brought honesty. He’d say, ‘Do you think people are getting bored with my pages?’ I was with him when he was sick and in the hospital and he was still talking about his pages. He’d go, ‘26, 29, 31.’ The doctors said, ‘What is he saying?’ I said, ‘He’s telling me to take a photo and move it over here.’ To the very end, he was still working on his pages.”

Gathering to Remember Bill Cunningham, Outside the Picture Frame

Friends and family members went to the Church of St. Thomas More in Manhattan to pay their respects to the photographer, who died on Saturday.

At Bill Cunningham’s funeral on Thursday morning, Anna Wintour wore blue Carolina Herrera, Annette de la Renta had on a light pleated summer dress that went to the knee, and Mercedes Bass opted for basic black.

Man on the Street

In Bill Cunningham’s fashion photos, mundane accessories of day-to-day life are as exalted as any platform shoe or deconstructed bustle.

Bill Cunningham’s job is not so different from a fisherman’s: it requires a keen knowledge, honed over years, of the local ecosystem and infinite patience in all manner of weather conditions. His first big catch was an accident

Capturing the Elusive Bill Cunningham

At 81, Bill Cunningham is probably the hardest working photojournalist in New York. Richard Press and Philip Gefter tried to keep up.

the miracle of “Bill Cunningham New York,” a new 88-minute documentary about the photographer of “On the Street” and “Evening Hours,” is that its subject agreed to participate in the first place.