Boris Lojkine on Late French Photographer: ‘I Felt Very Close’ to Camille

French photojournalist Camille Lepage was just 26 when she was killed covering the armed conflict in the Central African Republic, a country riven by violence between largely Muslim rebel groups an…

It was only after Lepage’s death that her story caught the attention of French filmmaker Boris Lojkine, whose sophomore narrative feature, “Camille,” will have its world premiere on the Piazza Grande during the Locarno Film Festival. Starring Nina Meurisse and based on extensive research with Lepage’s family, friends and colleagues, the film is both a moving coming-of-age story about a young photographer finding her artistic voice and a thoughtful exploration of the ethical challenges faced by war photographers in foreign lands.

Remembrances of Camille Lepage | dvafoto

A number of publications and individuals have published thoughtful remembrances of Camille and her work in the past few days (and I’m sure many more in French, as well), and I thought it’d be good to collect the links here

Correspondent

The 26-year-old French photographer Camille Lepage had begun to establish herself as a rising star in a ferociously competitive industry when she was caught up in a deadly shoot-out between rival militia in the Central African Republic, where she had spent recent months chronicling the impoverished country's sectarian bloodletting and its impact on the civilian population.

Bearing Witness, Losing Her Life

Camille Lepage, a 26-year-old photographer who considered it her duty to delve into stories in often-overlooked places, was killed in the Central African Republic. Nicholas Kulish remembers.

Photojournalist Camille Lepage

Notes from the Field: Camille Lepage in South Sudan

I met Camille Lepage in South Sudan last September when I arrived in the capital Juba on a two-week assignment. She had already been living there for almost two months, and has been there ever since. She was a huge help in getting our story off of the ground and filling my colleague and I in on how South Sudan works, with all the necessary tips and tricks that help make things happen there. And there are a lot of tips and tricks needed.