Self-Portraits From Black Photographers Reflecting on America

"I’ve found strength in being able to hold and see myself at this moment in time."

Self-Portraits From Black Photographers Reflecting on America

Andrea Bruce, Aida Muluneh, Carlos Javier Ortiz Win $30K Catchlight Fellowships | PDNPulse

This year's fellowships will support projects about democracy in the U.S., police shootings in California, and photographic representation of Africa.

Photographers Andrea Bruce, Carlos Javier Ortiz and Aida Muluneh have won the 2018 Catchlight Fellowships, the San Francisco-based organization announced today. The winners will each receive a $30,000 grant to support an ongoing project.

“A Thousand Midnights”: Chicago and the Legacy of the Great Migration

In Carlos Javier Ortiz’s photo series, black experience of the past and present seems to intermingle and collide.

In early 2015, my husband, Carlos Javier Ortiz, began working on “A Thousand Midnights,” a photo series and short film that use the surviving documents of my mother’s family history, juxtaposed with pictures of Chicago’s black communities today, to explore the legacy of the Great Migration a century after it began

A Look at How Youth Violence Affects Communities in Philadelphia and Chicago

Carlos Javier Ortiz began working on what would become his series “We All We Got” in 2006, when stray bullets in Chicago killed two young girls—one was...

Carlos Javier Ortiz began working on what would become his series “We All We Got” in 2006, when stray bullets in Chicago killed two young girls—one was celebrating her 11th birthday in her home, the other was getting ready to go to school.

A Conversation With Carlos Javier Ortiz on Facing Change: Documenting America

Sara T’Rula, the interviewer, is a photographer working on cultural and political issues, and is based in Liverpool, England. In addition to shooting her own projects, she assists John Davies and Ed Clark. At photokina 2012, she grabbed ten minutes to talk with Carlos Javier Ortiz about FCDA where he delves into what the project is and the purpose behind it.

RFK Center Announces Winners of 2009 Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards

From Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice & Human Rights:

Domestic Photography Winner: “Too Young to Die” by Carlos Javier Ortiz, freelancer:  Featured in Ebony Magazine, this series examines the epidemic of gun violence which not only plagues lower-income, urban neighborhoods, but youth from all walks of American life. Ortiz’ artistry and sensitivity delivers a powerful look at a tough subject.

International Photography: “Birth and Death”, Carol Guzy, Washington Post:  With one in eight women dying in childbirth, Sierra Leone has the world’s highest rate of maternal mortality. Carol Guzy beautifully and movingly captures the pain, desperation and grief experienced by family members dealing with the loss of a young mother, a child, or often both.  She amplifies the need for adequate medical care and supplies to stem the avoidable deaths.   Guzy is a multiple RFK Award winner.

Check it out here.

via APAD.