Ralph Morse, Life Photographer of Big Events, Is Dead at 97

Mr. Morse, a Bronx native, was, at 24, the weekly magazine’s youngest war photographer and later covered the Mercury space program.

“If Life could afford only one photographer,” George P. Hunt, who was the magazine’s managing editor in the 1960s, once said, “it would have to be Ralph Morse.”

Ralph Morse, Iconic Photojournalist, Dies at 97

Morse is best remembered for his iconic images of NASA’s earliest astronauts and the developing space program of the 1960s.

Morse is best remembered, however, for his iconic images of NASA’s earliest astronauts and the developing space program of the 1960s. So woven into this fabric of innovation and exploration was he, that Morse was often called “the eighth astronaut,” as he documented the original Mercury Seven exclusively for Life magazine.

Obituary: LIFE Photographer Ralph Morse, 97 | PDNPulse

Photographer Ralph Morse, who covered war, sports, science, celebrities, theater, and other assignments during his long career as a staff photographer for LIFE and TIME magazines, died December 7 at his home in Florida. He was 97. Morse’s death was report

Morse’s death was reported yesterday by TIME magazine, which said on its website that “no photographer in the history of LIFE magazine had a more varied, thrilling and productive career.” Morse became LIFE’s youngest World War II correspondent when he joined the magazine in 1941 at the age of 24.