Robin Hammond on the insider and outsider - Inside Imaging

Australian journalist, Alison Stieven-Taylor, publisher of popular blog Photojournalism Now, has launched a new monthly video series in which she interviews leading documentary photographers. The…

The series, Photojournalism Now: In Conversation, kicks off with a 22-minute discussion with Robin Hammond, an award-winning New Zealand documentary photographer and human rights activist. Hammond is represented by Panos Pictures, has won a World Press Photo prize, is a W.Eugene Smith Fund recipient, and exhibited work across the world.

Looking at New Generations of African Photographers

A new generation of African artists, inspired by their predecessors and helped by technology, has been redefining how Africans look at themselves.

While powerful work on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues in Africa has been done by documentary photographers like Robin Hammond of New Zealand, with his project “Where Love Is Illegal,” the approach of liberal Western media can reinforce the notion that homosexuality in Africa is a “perversion” of traditional African values introduced by foreigners, or a colonial legacy that imposed European religious conservatism and rails against such relations as “unnatural.”

Photographing Lagos, 'As Much an Experience as a Place'

Robin Hammond set out to document Lagos, a teeming metropolis where “intimacy and exclusion, love and hate, laughter and insult regularly rub shoulders” on its streets.

Robin Hammond: I have been an outsider most of my life. As an immigrant or photographer in the countries where I have lived and worked, I have not truly belonged. I’ve been a foreigner for so long that I don’t really know anything else. It has become part of who I am.

6 Photojournalists on Conflict, Loss, and Redemption - Feature Shoot

22-year-old Basemae Maombi, whose eyes were cut out after she recognized one of them men raping her and called out his name in an attempt to make him stop. ©…

Conflict, available now on Netflix, comprises six episodes. Photographers Pete Muller, Joao Silva, Donna Ferrato, Nicole Tung, Robin Hammond, and Eros Hoagland are each given seven minutes or less to explain, justify, or simply to testify to the years they’ve spent on the frontline of some of the world’s deepest traumas. The entire series is barely 35 minutes, and those minutes go by in the blink of an eye, but—like the photographs made by its heroes and heroines—they stick around for a while.

Robin Hammond Wins 2014 POYi World Understanding Award | PDNPulse

Photographer Robin Hammond has won the 2014 World Understanding Award at the Pictures of the Year International (POYi) competition for “Condemned,” his widely acclaimed project about the neglect and mistreatment of the mentally ill in African countries ra

The World Understanding Award is a category of POYi’s Reportage Division, which is open to freelance and agency photographers

LightBox | Time

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“Where there is war, famine, displacement, it is always the most vulnerable who suffer the greatest” says Robin Hammond. The mentally ill, he notes, are a “voiceless minority condemned to lives of quiet misery.”

Robin Hammond Wins $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Fund Grant | PDNPulse

Photographer Robin Hammond has been awarded the 2013 W. Eugene Smith Grant, a $30,000 prize, to help complete his ongoing project called “Condemned–Mental Health in African Countries in Crisis.” Hammond has spent two years working on the project, which do

Photographer Robin Hammond has been awarded the 2013 W. Eugene Smith Grant, a $30,000 prize, to help complete his ongoing project called “Condemned–Mental Health in African Countries in Crisis.”

Photography in Service to Humanity

The photographer Robin Hammond’s long-term work documenting mental illness in several African countries has earned him the W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography.

Robin Hammond: “I never wanted to photograph death but the real world violence and blood filled the streets,” he said. “The social pain was so great and injustices so constant that the only way to understand this madness was through photography.”

LightBox | Time

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“But you get into some of these places and they’re vertical city slums: no power, no water, no jobs. And the atmosphere. I’ve been to Congo and Somalia and all those kinds of places but I don’t think I’ve seen people as scared as the people in Zimbabwe.”

A Sense of Urgency in Africa

Robin Hammond hopes to hit people hard with his photographs of the mentally ill in Africa, “Condemned.”

Robin Hammond’s study of the mentally ill in Africa, “Condemned,” started with a chance encounter.