Stephen Crowley: a Visual Historian in Real Time

Stephen Crowley, who has retired after 25 years of photographing Washington and politics, on working for The Times, the changes he’s seen in the country, and on what’s next.

After 25 years as a photographer for The New York Times based in Washington, D.C., Stephen Crowley has retired. His incisive and revealing photographs pierced the public veneer of Washington politics, bringing the viewer into the back rooms of power.

APAD blog

This year, GeekFest is heading back to where it all began -- Washington, D.C., Sept 16-18, 2016. for those trying to make travel plans, things will kick off around 6pm Friday night, and wrap by 6pm...

The line-up of speakers is incredible: Jose Cabaço, Stephen Crowley, Carol Guzy, Greg Kahn, Mike Kepka, Elizabeth Krist, Zun Lee, Jonathan Newton, Ruddy Roye, Lexey Swall, and Dani Zalcman. We’re also putting together a special panel discussion with editors and art buyers, hoping to answer the question “what are editors looking for?” And as always, we have a few surprises up our sleeves…

Stephen Crowley: Time Spent: Florida 1972-1984

I discovered Stephen Crowley's terrific exploration of Florida in the 1970's and 80's when jurying Photolucida's Critical Mass Competition. Stephen's project, Time Spent: Florida 1972-1984 went on to be selected as one of the Top 50 portfolios of 2015. At

I discovered Stephen Crowley’s terrific exploration of Florida in the 1970’s and 80’s when jurying Photolucida’s Critical Mass Competition. Stephen’s project, Time Spent: Florida 1972-1984 went on to be selected as one of the Top 50 portfolios of 2015. At the young age of 20, Stephen had already identified himself as a street photographer and had a rare ability to capture moments that, now seen 40 years later, were insightful, telling, and iconic. His work allows us to consider a period in history that comes after the shape-shifting era of change in the 1960’s and early 1970’s and realize that Florida was slower to evolve and that the stark contrast between the classes was ever present.

The Last Slideshow: The Brilliant Stephen Crowley's So Long to Mitt Romney - Reading The Pictures

In the last photo of the last slideshow before signing off on the Romney campaign, Crowley makes a sweet gesture.

On face value, Stephen Crowley is merely offering glimpses into stagecraft and campaign ephemera. Look further though, and the photos are silent editorials, even essays about the candidate, his personality and political culture.

Convention Storybook

The New York Times has assembled a “Convention Storybook,” an online archive of the conventions. It is a look inside the two parties as they sought to articulate their platforms and positions as clearly as possible, without interference. The “Convention Storybook” presents photographs by Stephen Crowley, Josh Haner, Todd Heisler, Doug Mills, Damon Winter, Mike Appleton, Travis Dove, Edward Linsmier, Luke Sharrett, Robert Stolarik, Max Whitaker and Jim Wilson. Michael Barbaro provided audio and it was produced by Nick Corasaniti, Jacqueline Myint and Cornelius Schmid

Parts 6 and 7: Stephen Crowley’s Smoke-Filled Rooms

In the sixth and seventh installments of the “Smoke-Filled Rooms” series, Stephen Crowley, a staff photographer at The New York Times, looks back on the conventions, striving to see beyond the restrictions, spin and control of the contemporary American political process. With an unorthodox presentation of photographs and text, Mr. Crowley examines the forces that influence the presidential campaign.

Part 5: Stephen Crowley’s Smoke-Filled Rooms

In the fifth installment of the “Smoke-Filled Rooms” series, Stephen Crowley, a staff photographer at The New York Times, continues to look beyond the restrictions, spin and control of the contemporary American political process. With an unorthodox presentation of photographs and text, Mr. Crowley examines the forces that influence the presidential campaign.

Part 4 of Stephen Crowley’s ‘Smoke-Filled Rooms’ Series

In the fourth installment of the “Smoke-Filled Rooms” series, Stephen Crowley, a staff photographer at The New York Times, continues to look beyond the restrictions, spin and control of the contemporary American political process. With an unorthodox presentation of photographs and text, Mr. Crowley examines the forces that influence the presidential campaign.

Watching Palin

The third picture essay in “Smoke-Filled Rooms” — a documentary, presented in serial form.

This is the third picture essay in a series for Lens called “Smoke-Filled Rooms” — a documentary, presented in serial form, that strives to move beyond restrictions, spin and control of the contemporary American political game in order to present its processes and consequences

President Obama's 1 Percent Solution

This is the first picture essay in a new series for Lens called “Smoke-Filled Rooms.” The series will examine the processes and consequences of contemporary American politics.

This is the first picture essay in a new series for Lens called “Smoke Filled Rooms.” The series will examine the processes and consequences of contemporary American politics.

The Problem of Washington Photo Coverage Goes Well Beyond Restagings, Stephen Crowley Argues – NYTimes.com

President Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel were clearly of two very different minds about the prospect of Israel reverting to its pre-1967 borders. The official White House photo by Pete Souza — showing the two leaders huddling outside the Oval Office on Friday — didn’t make life easy for picture editors. By releasing this single picture, was the White House trying to convey a sense of comity? Of presidential confidence? Of a deep understanding between president and prime minister? There was no answering these questions, because no journalists witnessed the moment.

The Idiosyncratic Eye of Stephen Crowley

Stephen Crowley may be a bit shy in person, but he’s taken some bold gambles with traditional forms of photojournalism.

Stephen Crowley has spent most of his career masquerading as a newspaper photographer while producing idiosyncratic projects that push the boundaries of photojournalism and reveal unvarnished truths behind his most frequent subject: Washington politics. Mr. Crowley, 57, a staff photographer for The New York Times, consistently takes risks in his photography. He was employing complex compositions in newspaper photography long before the style became trendy.

On Assignment: Asia in the Blink of an Eye – Lens

President Obama, whose motorcade has been as long as 71 vehicles, is always at least 30 cars ahead of the four-person photo pool trailing him as he tours Asia. I really wanted a whimsical picture of the president as he walked past the “No Smoking” sign in the Forbidden City, but his Chinese police escorts blocked the shot as his entourage swept by.

On Assignment: Notes From a Whirlwind

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Lens Blog – NYTimes.com:

Stephen Crowley has just returned from covering President Obama’s trip to Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Germany and France. These tetraptychs convey the round-the-clock cognitive dissonance of such a journey, with its multiple agendas and audiences — “Bilats and Tea,” Mr. Crowley calls it, using the diplomatic jargon for a bilateral talk. He also assembled a verbal scrapbook of impressions, drawn from press communiqués, pool reports and news accounts.

Covering the No Talk Express – by Stephen Crowley – The Digital Journalist

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Click Note: You have to click on the “Feature Gallery” tab to see the photographs in the portfolio. It’s very easy to miss, so don’t.

Most days a campaign will put out the same bowl of fruit for us to interpret—accuracy, of course, is paramount—and some will paint it, sculpt it, or wax poetic in the hope of making it more interesting than it looked the day before. But lately, John McCain’s campaign schedule has been as erratic as a gold mine penny stock I’ve been watching.

Check it out here.