Opinion | Don’t Turn Away From These Images and These Crimes

Ethnic cleansing in Ethiopia began with murder, rape and pillage, and now moves to mass starvation.

These photos were taken by Lynsey Addario, a conflict photographer and old friend who happened to be in Ethiopia to shoot photos for National Geographic, a visit approved long before the latest attacks. She interviewed nine women who had been raped as part of the ethnic cleansing.

The Month New York Woke Up

May 2021 was the turning point, and we chronicled it, moment by moment, through the eyes of 15 photographers 25 and under.

During the pandemic, one of New York City’s greatest qualities — its delirious density — became a liability. New Yorkers had to adjust to a strange new reality, in which avoiding one another was the safe and responsible choice. But last month, with the vaccination rate soaring and hospitalizations plummeting, the lockdown mind-set evaporated, and the city surged back to life. The New York Times Magazine documented this reawakening through the eyes of 15 photographers, all of them age 25 or younger. For all 31 days of May, they fanned out around the city to capture the hope and excitement, the release of pent-up social energy — but also the anxiety and uncertainty about what might happen next.

Maki: (A) Japan Somewhere

Maki's images in Japan Somewhere (Zen Foto Gallery), produced over a fourteen-year period feel anxious and compressed. Though specific to one country, the Frenchman's images feel anything but declarative. They feel ambulatory, intrepid,  and often chaotic

Maki’s images in Japan Somewhere (Zen Foto Gallery), produced over a fourteen-year period feel anxious and compressed. Though specific to one country, the Frenchman’s images feel anything but declarative. They feel ambulatory, intrepid,  and often chaotic as if shot in a constant state of momentum and high velocity. The frames are heavily compressed with the comings and goings of Janese street life cum theater. Occasionally you catch a grainy view of the sky overhead as birds pass in a state of flight, compressed into the frame like a vinyl decal on a store window-they almost feel as unreal as the street from which Maki makes his photographs.

Cast Out of Heaven - Home’21 International Photography Prize Winner | LensCulture

Home’21 International Photography Prize Winner

In addition to the huge population moving from Tehran, people from all over Iran are migrating to these new towns. These new developments are notorious for social pathologies, like high rates of suicide among pupils and drug abuse. The residents talk about how a town’s population has doubled over the past six months, reaching 200,000. Yet, the town can hardly provide educational, social and health care services for 10,000. Here is the land of those cast out of their heaven — the metropolitan Tehran. And they all share is the bitterness of the fall. – Hashem Shakeri

The Boston Press Photographers Association's 'Historic' Photos of 2020

The images look back on a challenging year as captured by press photographers.

On May 24 2021, the BBPA, which is the oldest press and television photographers association in the United States, debuted its first outdoor exhibition in the organization’s 95-year history, produced in collaboration with Photoville, a New York-based non-profit organization that works to promote a wider understanding and increased access to the art of photography for all.
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The Photographer Who Captured the Birth of Hip-Hop

As a teen-ager, Joe Conzo, Jr., took intimate pictures of the Bronx music scene. He’s lived several lives in the time since.

Joe Conzo, Jr., grew up in a proud, politically engaged family of Puerto Rican New Yorkers. His father, Joe, Sr., was a historian of Latin music who was tight with the scene’s biggest stars—Tito Puente, Johnny Pacheco, Ray Barretto. His grandmother was the activist Evelina López Antonetty, whose fierce work organizing on behalf of schoolchildren earned her a reputation among locals as the “Hell Lady of the Bronx.” In 1981, she spearheaded protests against the production of “Fort Apache, the Bronx,” a cop movie starring Paul Newman that many residents feared would portray their neighborhood in a poor light. Conzo, still in his teens, grabbed his camera and headed to the demonstrations, too.

An elderly couple in Spain kissed through plastic film because of COVID-19. An AP photographer just won a Pulitzer for photographing the moment. - Poynter

Associated Press photographer Emilio Morenatti won the 2021 prize in Feature Photography for his yearlong work in Spain photographing the elderly.

Emilio Morenatti began photographing the elderly in Spain during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, when it was decimating communities throughout Europe, and provided a glimpse into what was happening to the most vulnerable populations internationally for the remainder of the year.

Focus on Vernacular: Greg Sand: Chronicle - LENSCRATCH

To begin this week of celebrating artists using vernacular or found photographs, we need to describe this ever expanding genre. We use the term vernacular to illustrate this week’s images because they employ the visual language of the everyday, photograph

Artist Greg Sand has a legacy of considering other people’s photographs, transforming the images in new ways to speak about memory, the passage of time, mortality, and the photograph’s role in shaping our experience of loss. We are thrilled to have Greg as our juror this month for the Vernacular Exhibition which will run on Saturday. Greg shares his own thoughts on the subject and Roland Barthes words from Camera Lucida, “Photography’s unique ability to capture a fleeting moment allows it to expose the temporality of life. “By giving me the absolute past of the pose… the photograph tells me death in the future… I shudder over a catastrophe which has already occurred.” These words from Roland Barthes’s Camera Lucida precisely describe how I feel when I consider a photograph so old that the subject must be dead. My response has a number of layers: I feel an immediate connection to the living person in the photograph, followed by a dread of what inevitably is to come for them, completed by a sense of grief over what has, of course, already transpired. This reaction is why my work utilizes found photographs, which I manipulate to create a narrative exploring mortality. My work aims to question the nature of photographs and challenge the traditional definition of photography.

Cai Dongdong – History of Life

Cai Dongdong History of Life Captured through the eyes of ordinary Chinese citizens before, during, and after the cultural revolution and curated by one of China’s most talented visual artist…

Captured through the eyes of ordinary Chinese citizens before, during, and after the cultural revolution and curated by one of China’s most talented visual artists, “History of Life” presents a fascinating story on the determination of the human spirit. A collection of 415 restored photographs chronicling the history of modern China from the 1910s to the late 1990s.