Until The Corn Grows Back – The Leica camera Blog

I choose to photograph using a fixed lens, as it demands a proximity to my subjects that a zoom lens does not. Proximity, especially among vulnerable populations, is a privilege that must be earned through meaningful consent and trust building. I seek to understand the lives of the people whom I photograph in order to portray them as truthfully as possible. The intimacy I aim to capture through images can only be achieved if people trust me to share their stories; this requires collaboration. This is my approach to visual storytelling, and it allows me to amplify in a dignified way the voices of people who experience hunger.

Publisher's Spotlight: Café Royal Books - LENSCRATCH

These past months have been all about books on Lenscratch. In order to understand the contemporary photo book landscape, we are interviewing and celebrating significant photography book publishers, large and small, who are elevating photographs on the pag

Documentary photography — post-war, with links to Britain and Ireland. The work I publish is made by photographers from the celebrity to the unknown. It’s about the work, and it’s about getting the work seen, and ‘locked’ into the timeline of photography, where it should have already been.
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Categorized as Books

Photographers Seek to Revive Lawsuit Against Instagram Over Embedding

The photographers want to succeed where they've failed previously.

Hunley and Brauer are asking to overturn a California federal judge’s dismissal of their lawsuit alleging that Meta’s Instagram is liable for secondary infringement when third-party sites use Instagram’s embedding tool to display their photos and videos. They argue that this former ruling relied on an outdated test.

Communism(s): A Cold War Album — Blind Magazine

Autocracy is on the rise. An obvious statement maybe, but one rooted more and more firmly in the present albeit with a shaky-hand salute to the past. From Attila the Hun and Genghis Khan, through Napoleon, Stalin, and Hitler, and more recently, Hussein, A

Upon first viewing of the classic, black-and-white, observe-and-capture images in Grace’s book, one familiar element is the public displays of larger-than-life portraits dotting the bland concreteness of the cities Grace traveled through. Stern visages of elected officials and members of the various politburos who maintained the status quo of communism overlaid on society created a sense of menace, as if Big Brother was watching everyone’s every move.

Thomas Hoepker Looks Back at Six Decades of Photojournalism — Blind Magazine

The Magnum Photos member revisits his storied career in a new exhibition and monograph.

After receiving a 9×12 camera from his grandfather in 1950, Hoepker became obsessed with photography. By the end of the decade, he was working as a photojournalist — and soon became one of the leading photographers of his day. He traveled the globe, building an extraordinary archive, which Magnum Photos began to distribute in 1964, the same year he joined Stern magazine as a photo-reporter.

Juxtapoz Magazine - Larry Towell's Friendship with the Old Colony Mennonites

"In 1989, I discovered them in my own back yard, land-hungry and dirt poor. They came looking for work in the vegetable fields and fruit orchards of L...

Larry Towell photographed the Old Colony Mennonites in rural Ontario and Mexico between 1990 and 1999. The resulting black and white photographs—accompanied by an extensive text drawn from diary notes and ‘the silt of the memory’—formed Towell’s landmark book, The Mennonites, first published in 2000. This revised and updated second edition published by GOST revisits the project and includes 40 previously unpublished photographs.

Living on the Streets in One of America’s Richest Cities — Blind Magazine

For six years, Robert Gumpert documented the unhoused in San Francisco. Division Street is the culmination, named for the street where the project began. Combining first-person narratives, found text and Gumpert's photographs, it is the story of lives liv

“I began walking the streets and thinking about what I was seeing. Walking home from the jail I would sometimes run into people living on the street who I ‘knew’ from jail. Some of them wanted copies of their jail photos; or a new one, which I did.”

THE CENTER AWARDS: Excellence in Multimedia Storytelling Award: Dan Fenstermacher - LENSCRATCH

Congratulations to Dan Fenstermacher for being selected for CENTER’s Excellence in Multimedia Storytelling Award recognizing his project, Food Chain. The Excellence in Multimedia Storytelling Award recognizes outstanding storytellers using lens-based medi

Working everyday except Tuesdays the fisherman from the seaside towns of Prampram, Cape Coast, and Ada, Ghana, head out to sea where they fish up to 40 kilometers offshore. For generations families of these communities have fished the Atlantic Ocean. What they catch will determine the livelihood of the community and their families. During the summer months of 2021 I photographed the story of these local communities of fisherman.

THE CENTER AWARDS: Social Award: Debe Arlook - LENSCRATCH

Debe Arlook Congratulations to Debe Arlook for being selected for CENTER’s Social Award recognizing her project, one, one thousand…. The Social Awards recognize work engaged in social issues. All projects exploring social topics or themes were eligible. J

one, one thousand… is a love story and an unconventional documentary exposing the impact a rare and incurable form of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, has on a mother and son’s experience of life-long care. This is a family caregiver’s story of devotion and perseverance.

THE CENTER AWARDS: Social Award: Luis Corzo - LENSCRATCH

Congratulations to Luiz Corzo for being selected for CENTER’s Social Award recognizing his project, PASACO. The Social Awards recognize work engaged in social issues. All projects exploring social topics or themes were eligible. JUROR: Jess T. Dugan, Arti

(Guatemala City, Guatemala) On the 18th of April, 1996, my father and I were abducted from our home and held captive for thirty-three days by an organized crime group known as “Los Pasaco”. In the early 90s, “Los Pasaco” were the most feared and notorious group of criminals in the country. During this captivity, my father was physically tortured and eventually had his left ring finger amputated and sent to my grandfather to pressure him into sending more money for ransom. Eventually, my father was released on the 30th day and told to gather more ransom money in order to have me released. Three days later, I was released in the small town of Chiquimulilla, Santa Rosa.