The Raqqa Diaries: life under Isis rule

Your neighbours beheaded, the terror of the religious police: in this extract from a new book, a Syrian activist, interviewed below, records the horror in his city

Content-Aware: Celebrating Ren Hang

It was shocking news to find out about the death of Ren Hang this past Thursday. Ren Hang, 29, was one of the most prominent Chinese photographers of his time, and his pictures are some of the most recognizable throughout the world

Winners of Pictures of the Year International

Each year, the contest adds an “Impact” category about a major news topic. Last year’s was “Exodus,” based on the global refugee crisis. This year, the category was “The Islamic State Conflict” and first place was awarded to Alessio Romenzi.

Rick Shaw, the director of POYi, said the quality of work in that category showed that visual journalists “continue to put themselves in harm’s way and continue to shed light on the people who are affected by the conflict.”

Looking at All Sides in Colombia’s Conflict

When combatants lay down their weapons, it’s merely the beginning of peace. The harder task, especially in a conflict that has dragged on for decades, it to find social peace. The Spanish photographer Alvaro Ybarra found that to be the case in Colombia, where lawmakers last year approved a peace accord with the FARC rebels

What It’s Like Working with a Military-Grade Thermal Imaging Camera

In our February “Exposures” story about Richard Mosse’s new film and book, “Incoming,” Mosse spoke about why he decided to use a thermal imaging camera in order to create a body of work about the refugee crisis. During the same interview, Mosse discussed the logistical challenges of using a tool meant for military surveillance to create art.

Trump vs. the Press: A Small-Town Boy (Well, Sort of) in Washington

He’s not in Manhattan anymore. This New York-iest of politicians, now an idiosyncratic, write-your-own-rules president, has stumbled into the most conventional of Washington traps: believing he can master an entrenched political press corps with far deeper connections to the permanent government of federal law enforcement and executive department officials than he has.

Thomas Kellner

His work is often referred to Cubism considering that his creative process includes a construction but the results resemble a deconstruction. Thomas Kellner’s works imitate the wandering look of the eye, showing us segments of the total which come together as one image. Therefore his photographs do not deconstruct architecture but reconstruct our view on it. At the same time his work also reflects the flood of pictures we live in nowadays and furthermore contains the question of decaying cultural values

Swarat Ghosh – Beyond Street

For me in the street I normally try to catch the emotions more than anything. For me “Content” is the King. As long as I am getting strong subjects with varied emotions which people can easily relate to, I think as a photographer I have done justice to myself. I just enjoy the whole experience of making pictures till date. For me, street photography is all about the timing and the capacity to observe. I pat myself on the back for the sheer dedication with which I push myself when making images on the streets. Many times I feel to skip on weekends (due to my software job) but somehow drag myself just for the sheer joy of clicking that magic picture at a time.

Drug War: Photographers in Philippines on Powerful Images

More than 7,000 people in the Philippines have been killed in President Rodrigo Duterte’s campaign against drugs since July. According to statistics released by the country’s national police, cited by Rappler and Human Rights Watch, more than 2,500 of those slain in the offensive were suspected drug dealers and users; another 3,600-plus were killed by unidentified vigilantes. As the nightly warfare has intensified, so has the haunting coverage by local photographers. TIME asked 12 of them—working independently or for the various wire agencies—to mine their archives, select a picture that particularly impacted them and detail its significance.

Alex Majoli, Skēnē

Italian photographer Alex Majoli documents the thin line between reality and theatre in a series of photographs, which will be on view from February 16 – April 1, 2017 at Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York. The photographs, made in Congo, Egypt, Greece, Germany, India, China, and Brazil between 2010 and 2016, explore the human condition and call into question darker elements of society. The title of the exhibition, SKĒNĒ, refers to a structure forming the backdrop of an ancient Greek theater

Tales From a Street Photographer in St. Petersburg

When I asked Alexander Petrosyan to tell me why St. Petersburg is a great place for street photography, he answered honestly. It isn’t. It’s usually freezing, and the streets are never well-lit. The streets are mostly empty because everyone is always in a hurry to get someplace. He takes pictures here not because it’s easy but because it’s been his home for more than four decades.

Bookstore Browsing: 10 Photo Books from Tokyo

Japan is famous for its camera brands and love of photography, but outside of Daido Moriyama, most westerners would probably be hard-pressed to name a Japanese photographer. In browsing a number of titles at the Tsutaya bookstore, I was struck by the popularity of vernacular photography. And in a land replete with the highest resolution digital cameras and technical accuracy, many Japanese photographers seem to embrace film and aim for a grittier aesthetic – perhaps a photographic reflection of their concept of wabi-sabi or the acceptance of imperfection and transience.

Peter van Agtmael: Buzzing at the Sill

Peter van Agtmael’s new monograph, Buzzing at the Sill published by Kehrer, is a timely collection of images of a more challenged America, a sequel to his well-celebrated book, Disco Nights September 11th. Expanding on his work created during the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq from 2006 to 2013, and their impact back home, Buzzing at the Sill, shows us a country in flux, a country in crisis, and more importantly, a country in need of better days

Pete Muller Wins POYi Reportage Photographer of the Year; Matt Gade Wins Sports Photographer of the Year

The surprise winner of POYi Sports Photographer of the Year is Matt Gade, a staff photographer at The Daily Republic in Mitchell, South Dakota. Getty photographers Donald Miralle and Christian Petersen won second and third place, respectively. Gade won for a portfolio that includes dramatic moments from games between local college and amateur teams, and a story (above) about South Dakota rodeos

Photojournalism’s Uncertain Future? She Begs to Differ.

Earlier this week, Lens published a provocative and pessimistic interview about the state of photojournalism with Donald R. Winslow, the former editor of the NPPA magazine Press Photographer. Later that day, Leslye Davis, a young video journalist and photographer for The New York Times came into the Lens office with a differing, more optimistic point of view

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