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Reconciling Heritage and Hope Between Chicago and Mexico – The New York Times

A few years ago, Daniel Ramos’s grandmother asked him just how did he make a living as a photographer. Grants, he replied. His grandmother was puzzled: Do they pay you in food?

Google Search Could Ditch All Photo Thumbnails Under EU Copyright Law

In September 2018, the European Parliament voted in favor of the highly controversial EU Copyright Directive, which aims to “harmonize” copyright law across Europe. But critics argue the law could destroy the open Web, and now Google is showing an eye-opening look at what its search results could soon look like.

The Best Work I Saw at the Medium Festival of Photography: Part 2 | A Photo Editor

CJ Pressma is one of the types of people I alluded to above, as he’s been involved with photography at a high level since before I was born. CJ was visiting from Louisville, where he ran a residency program for many years.

With Foreign Bureaus Slashed, Freelancers are Filling the Void – At Their Own Risk

Since then, freelancers have increasingly filled the void. These include both Western journalists working in conflict zones around the world, as well as local journalists working in their own non-Western countries.

The New York Times’ Photographic Double Standard – PhotoShelter Blog

In covering the terrorist attack on a Nairobi hotel that killed at least 21 people by Shahab extremists, The New York Times decided to publish an image of a bullet-riddled body taken by Khalil Senosi. Photo Twitter was outraged, and Poynter wrote about the “hard choice” the NYT made regarding the selection.

Rethinking the ethical judgement of photography – Witness

When it comes to photography, however, especially other people’s photography, the challenges of acting ethically are sometimes obscured by the rush to ethical judgment. Our ethical standards are raised to standards that the great martyrs, saints, and philanthropists of times gone by would struggle to meet. One reason for this is it’s easy to do. There is no personal cost.

Marko Drobnjakovic: Finalist in the 2019 Aftermath Grant | LENSCRATCH

The Aftermath Project is a non-profit organization committed to telling the other half of the story of conflict — the story of what it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes, to restore civil societies, to address the lingering wounds of war while struggling to create new avenues for peace. The Aftermath Project holds a yearly grant competition open to working photographers worldwide covering the aftermath of conflict. A 2019 finalist is photographer Marko Drobnjakovic. The jurors for this year’s grant were Aftermath founder Sara Terry; photographer and writer Ibarionex Perello; Aline Smithson, photographer, writer and founder of The Candid Frame, Ibarionex Perello; Aline Smithson, photographer and editor of Lenscratch; and Todd J. Tubutis, Associate Director at Sheldon Museum of Art, soon to be Director at the Art Museum of West Virginia University.

Photos From the 2019 Dakar Rally – The Atlantic

With a ceremonial start in Lima, Peru, on January 7, a group of 334 competitors started the 41st annual Dakar Rally: a 10-day, 3,000-mile (5,000 kilometer) off-roading adventure held exclusively in Peru this year. The vehicles—which include specialized cars, trucks, motorcycles, and quad bikes—are currently on stage 9 of 10 stages that travel south to Tacna, then back to Lima on January 17. Here is a look at Dakar 2019 in progress, as teams race to the finish line.

How War Affects Photojournalists – Artsy

Even when photojournalists return from war zones physically unscathed, their experiences can continue to burden their psyches. They might suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder or anguish over their roles in witnessing human tragedy. But they do so to inform the public about the costs of war and to shape news coverage about global events. “When we look at these marvelous images, we find them compelling, moving, and sometimes shattering,” says neuropsychiatrist Dr. Anthony Feinstein. “We don’t think about the men and women who take the photographs.” In a new book, Feinstein aims to rectify that oversight.

  • War

Ralph Gibson – The Leica camera Blog

When Ralph Gibson’s first major work “The Somnambulist” was published in 1970, it marked a monumental moment in the evolution of photography. At a time when the medium was essentially defined by its ability to document reality in the form of photojournalism, Gibson was one of the first exponents of a new approach. Inspired by artists, writers and musicians of the day, “The Somnambulist” represented a seismic shift in the visual language of photography.

Helen Levitt’s Street Photos Blend the Poetic With the Political – The New York Times

New York City’s doorways, storefronts and cascading fire escapes were the grand backdrop to Helen Levitt’s photos. In the Lower East Side and Harlem, children pretended to be bride and groom, wore masks for Halloween or drew with chalk on the sidewalk. The lyricism of her work led her to be called the city’s visual poet laureate, supposedly an apolitical, black-and-white photographer of the everyday.

SF Chronicle Doubles A1 Photos Shot by Women Photographers | PDNPulse

According to data compiled by the organization Women Photograph, San Francisco Chronicle was far and away the leader among major newspapers in publishing A1 lead photographs shot by women in 2018. Forty-one percent of the Chronicle’s A1 images were shot by women, which nearly doubled their 2017 mark of 23.4 percent. According to Women Photograph, which promotes women journalists, other publications showed slight increases in 2018, but most continued the practice of publishing A1 images made by men more than 80 percent of the time; for several publications that number was more than 90 percent. At 26 percent, The Washington Post had the second-highest percentage of A1 lead images by women. Just 5.4 percent of The Wall Street Journal‘s lead images were by women, according to the Women Photograph data.

Lens Rentals | Blog

For those who are unfamiliar, the Nikon P1000 is essentially Nikon’s answer to all the amateur photography forum questions asking “If you could have one lens, what would it be?” If you’ve ever stumbled into one of these conversations, you’ll see that it’s a flood of people saying something to the effect of “a 10-2000mm f/2.8 lens”. While a lens of that stature would be impossible both optically and in weight, someone at Nikon was seemingly watching these forums, waiting to pitch their next crazy idea at the next board meeting.

Fatemeh Behboudi: Finalist in the 2019 Aftermath Grant | LENSCRATCH

The Aftermath Project is a non-profit organization committed to telling the other half of the story of conflict — the story of what it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes, to restore civil societies, to address the lingering wounds of war while struggling to create new avenues for peace. The Aftermath Project holds a yearly grant competition open to working photographers worldwide covering the aftermath of conflict. A 2019 finalist is photographer Fatemeh Behboudi. The jurors for this year’s grant were Aftermath founder Sara Terry; photographer and writer Ibarionex Perello; Aline Smithson, photographer and editor of Lenscratch; and Todd J. Tubutis, Director at the Art Museum of West Virginia University.

Glenna Gordon: Winner of the 2019 Aftermath Grant | LENSCRATCH

The Aftermath Project is a non-profit organization committed to telling the other half of the story of conflict — the story of what it takes for individuals to learn to live again, to rebuild destroyed lives and homes, to restore civil societies, to address the lingering wounds of war while struggling to create new avenues for peace. The Aftermath Project holds a yearly grant competition open to working photographers worldwide covering the aftermath of conflict. The 2019 winner of the $25,000 Grant is Glenna Gordon, for her project, American Women, which is an extension of her work covering the women of the alt-right movement and the post-Civil War legacy of white supremacy and hate in the U.S. The jurors for this year’s grant were Aftermath founder Sara Terry; photographer and writer Ibarionex Perello; Aline Smithson, photographer and editor of Lenscratch; and Todd J. Tubutis, Director at the Art Museum of West Virginia University.

No Photographic Memory in the Senate – The New York Times

He was not just an idle member of the Senate lamenting a missed opportunity. As chairman of the Senate Rules Committee, he could actually do something about the situation, and Mr. Blunt said he was open to a rules change that would allow photography in the Senate for special occasions, such as the opening of a new Congress.

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