Images of Libya from a Fallen Photographer

Tim Hetherington changed lives and journalism. A friend reflects on that enduring legacy, and how it inspired an exhibition opening this weekend in New York.

His effect on people was profound. Yet one of Tim’s most lasting legacies will be the changes he almost single-handedly wrought in the worlds of photojournalism and multimedia. This weekend, we’re opening an exhibit of his work at the Bronx Documentary Center, a gallery inspired by Tim’s vision and friendship

Split Legacy: How did Magnum Photos come to represent Tim Hetherington’s work?

When Magnum Photos’ members met last June, they voted to become the sole distributor of Tim Hetherington’s work – a decision that has since sparked intense debate and sometimes bitter critiscism in the photojournalism community. Olivier Laurent asks Hetherington’s former colleagues and friends what happened in the months following his death.

Sunday Times Dedication To Chris Hondros, Tim Hetherington

Gerry Souter was a photography student from the Art Institute who came to the work as a press photographer for the Chicago Tribune in 1964. He stayed two years. In that time, he had a view of photojournalism that we will never see again. Since that time, he has become a media consultant and prolific author, writing over 40 books with his wife Janet.      Recently he privately responded to one of my blog posts, sharing some of the history of photojournalism as practiced in Chicago about 47 years ago. It was fascinating, so I asked for a “10 Questions” interview about life as a press photographer in the early 60’s. 

When it turns sour – Greg Marinovich

I flinch from making too much of the deaths of journalists in conflicts, even that of friends. The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that in the same counterattack that killed Hetherington and Hondros, seven rebels had been killed as well as a doctor about to leave for work at the overwhelmed local hospital. His wife, a nurse, lost both her legs. They were unnamed.

Memorials Planned for Photographers Chris Hondros, Tim Hetherington (Update) | PDNPulse

The families of two photojournalists killed in a rocket attack on Misrata, Libya, on April 20 are organizing memorials. Dean Hondros, brother of photographer Chris Hondros, announced that a memorial service will take place Wednesday, April 27, at 1 pm at

The family of Tim Hetherington have created a web page, Timhetherington.org/condolences, where remembrances of their son are being posted.

War, in Life and Death

Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros, who were killed last week covering the fighting in Libya, used their cameras to communicate the human suffering of war.

Tim and Chris were very different men who died because they had something in common: each thought it important to bear witness, to make images that communicated human suffering and send them out to the world.

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

Although Tim Hetherington will best be remembered for his brave, nuanced and sensitive account of the war in Afghanistan, his first book, Long Story Bit By Bit: Liberia Retold, is an overlooked masterpiece.

Service Held for Combat Photographers and Doctor Killed in Misurata

This is an e-mail sent this morning from C.J. Chivers to the editors at Getty Images and Vanity Fair, describing events in Benghazi, Libya, since the remains of Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros arrived at the Benghazi port Thursday night. Mr. Hetherington, the conflict photographer and director of the Afghan war documentary “Restrepo,” and Mr. Hondros, one of the top war photographers of his generation, were killed Wednesday in Misurata, Libya.

RIP Chris & Tim

In lieu of flowers, the loved ones of Chris Hondros kindly request donations be made to The Chris Hondros Fund. This fund will provide scholarships for aspiring photojournalists and raise awareness of issues surrounding conflict photography. The Chris Hondros Fund c/o Christina Piaia 50 Bridge Street #414 Brooklyn, New York 11201

Sebastian Junger Remembers Tim Hetherington

The death of an incomparable photojournalist, killed on April 20 while covering the conflict in Libya, is recounted by his collaborator, confrère, and friend.

You had a very specific vision for your work and for your life, and that vision included your death. It didn’t have to, but that’s how it turned out. I’m so sorry, Tim. The conversation we could have had about this crazy stunt of yours! Christ, I would have yelled at you, but you know that. Getting mad was how we kept each other safe, how we kept the other from doing something stupid.

Journalists Killed in Libya, News Breaks on Facebook

When the first Western photojournalists covering the conflict in Libya were killed Wednesday, the world found out about it through Facebook and Twitter. Now the Facebook page of one of the photographers has become a defacto memorial for the online communi

When the first Western photojournalists covering the conflict in Libya were killed Wednesday, the world found out about it through Facebook and Twitter. Now the Facebook page of one of the photographers has become a defacto memorial for the online community to grieve his death and honor his life.

For What It's Worth

Image courtesy of Jim Bourg/Reuters Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington were killed yesterday in Misrata, Libya. I didn't know Tim. I respected his work and how he went about creating it. I did know Chris. He was a friend and...

Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington were killed yesterday in Misrata, Libya. I didn't know Tim. I respected his work and how he went about creating it. I did know Chris. He was a friend and a man I deeply admired.

Tim Hetherington's Last Interview - A Photo Editor

Outside magazine called over a month ago to ask if I would interview a photographer for their summer interview issue. I immediately pitched them Tim Hetherington whose work I admired although I’d never met or spoken with him before. The body of work he cr

Outside magazine called over a month ago to ask if I would interview a photographer for their summer interview issue. I immediately pitched them Tim Hetherington whose work I admired although I’d never met or spoken with him before.

In Memoriam | Tim Hetherington 1970-2011 Chris Hondros 1970-2011

Editor’s note: This post has been updated most recently on 1 May 2011. All the link additions can be found at the bottom of the post. The world lost Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros in Liby…

I would like to dedicate this post  to the memory of the two men and to their friends and family. My thoughts are with them at this very sad time. I can only imagine the pain felt by those who knew Tim and Chris personally.  I hope friends and family can find some solace in the fact that neither of them lived their lives in vain. Not only did both Hetherington and Hondros spend most of  their careers highlighting important issues  that would have otherwise been ignored or overlooked by the general public in countries such the UK and US, but they also practiced their craft at the very top tier of our industry to a very high standard and they were setting a mark towards which the rest of us should always strive for. Tim and Chris will be greatly missed.

Hetherington and Hondros, In Memoriam

I first met Chris while I was a sports intern at Getty last October. On the day I met him I was meeting with news editors, showing them my book. Hondros tried to quietly slipped through the office’s glass doors, but his presence was immediately known. As he entered, Sandy, the editor I was working with, excitedly said, “Look! That’s Chris Hondros, have you met him? He’s the nicest guy, just got back from Afghanistan.”