Category: Access & Censorship

  • Power, Consent, and Obligations in Photography | Conscientious Photography Magazine

    https://cphmag.com/power-consent-obligations/
    One of photography’s most important problems is the power imbalance between someone operating a camera and someone finding her or himself in front of it. Unless there is an actual collaboration going on, it is the photographer whose decisions result in what the subject looks like in the picture(s). I used “actual” in front of “collaboration” on purpose: unlike many other people, I do not think that having some chit chat with a subject makes for a collaboration. A collaboration would be a joint making of the picture, in which photographer and subject talk about how the subject wants to be portrayed, what the photographers sees in her or him, etc.
  • The attacks on press freedom in Portland – Columbia Journalism Review

    https://www.cjr.org/the_media_today/portland_trump_press_freedom.php
    THIS WEEK DAVE MILLER, who hosts a daily talk show on Oregon Public Broadcasting, interviewed “two very tired people”: Tuck Woodstock and Sergio Olmos, both independent journalists. Since late May, daily protests in solidarity with Black lives and against police brutality have taken place in Portland. Local outlets have often sent reporters, but not to cover every protest; mainstream national outlets mostly ignored Portland until last week, when OPB reported that federal agents in unmarked vehicles were snatching protesters off the streets. By contrast, freelancers like Woodstock and Olmos have been out night after night, documenting the scene.
  • A Seattle judge ruled 5 news outlets, including The Seattle Times, must give photos and video of protests to police – Poynter

    A Seattle judge ruled 5 news outlets, including The Seattle Times, must give photos and video of protests to police
    A Seattle judge ruled Friday five news outlets must turn over unreleased photos and videos from a late May protest to local law enforcement. The Seattle Police Department believes the raw footage would help solve an ongoing arson and theft investigation, but First Amendment lawyers believe the ruling is troubling.
  • Photo of COVID-19 victim in Indonesia sparks fascination—and denial

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/2020/07/covid-victim-photograph-sparks-fascination-and-denial-indonesia/
    Photojournalist Joshua Irwandi shadowed hospital workers in Indonesia, taking a striking image of a plastic-wrapped body of a COVID-19 victim while making sure not to reveal distinguishing characteristics, or even gender.
  • Opinion | Why Does the N.Y.P.D. Want to Punish Journalists? – The New York Times

    “Let’s revoke the NYPD’s ability to issue press credentials entirely. They’ve repeatedly proven that they are unwilling and unable to oversee a legitimate process,” Scott Stringer, the city’s comptroller, tweeted. Keith Powers, a City Council member, tweeted that he was considering legislation that would move credentialing to a new agency.
  • Photographers Grapple With ‘Informed Consent’ in Uprising | FAIR

    Photographers Grapple With ‘Informed Consent’ in Uprising
    A new Photo Bill of Rights, inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic and the current uprising against police brutality, has caused fissures in the American photojournalism community and raised an important question about “informed consent” in photographing protesters.
  • bellingcat – Visualizing Police Violence Against Journalists At Protests Across The U.S – bellingcat

    https://www.bellingcat.com/news/americas/2020/06/05/visualizing-police-violence-against-journalists-at-protests-across-the-us/
    We plotted all of this data onto an interactive map. You can use this map to visualize where these incidents happened in space and time, and notice some areas where multiple instances happened over the course of a protest. This indicates these were not “one time incidents” or accidents due to journalists getting in the way. There is evidence here of systematic and conscious repression of the press at these protests, in cities all across the country — and the data that has been collected is the proof.
  • Photographer Sues Police for Blinding Her Left Eye, Uses Last Photo as Proof

    https://petapixel.com/2020/06/16/photographer-sues-police-for-blinding-her-left-eye-uses-last-photo-as-proof/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+PetaPixel+%28PetaPixel%29
    According to court documents obtained by PetaPixel, Ms. Tirado “stepped in front of the protesting crowd and aimed her professional Nikon camera at the police officers to take a picture of the police line.” Despite the fact that she was wearing visible press credentials, the complaint claims that police first marked her using a bright green ballistic tracking round, before “[shooting] her in her face with foam bullets.”
  • Podcast: Photojournalists Have a Heated Ethics Debate & Black Photographers Create the VogueChallenge – PhotoShelter Blog

    Podcast: Photojournalists Have a Heated Ethics Debate & Black Photographers Create the VogueChallenge
    As photographers responded to the controversial Poynter article entitled “Photographers are being called on to stop showing protesters’ face. Should they?” PhotoShelter co-founder Allen Murabayashi published a series of pieces that intensified the conversation around the First Amendment and the well-being of protesters and vulnerable populations.
  • On Ethics, The First Amendment, and Photographing Protestors’ Faces – PhotoShelter Blog

    On Ethics, The First Amendment, and Photographing Protestors’ Faces
    A vigorous, sometimes vitriolic debate has erupted in photography circles around whether to photograph protestors’ faces. As someone who’s written about the topic, I’m struck by the clumping together of disparate concepts and issues, which has made discussion difficult. People are arguing, but they are often arguing about different concepts simultaneously.
  • Yunghi Kim: “Is agreeing NOT to show a person’s face against the ethics of journalism?” – PhotoShelter Blog

    Yunghi Kim: “Is agreeing NOT to show a person’s face against the ethics of journalism?”
    A journalist’s job is to report and inform, not report and withhold or alter. People in a public space have no expectation of privacy nor should they. Nor should we as photojournalists get into the murkiness of negotiating or agreeing to shield IDs in a public space.
  • No, Photojournalists Aren’t Advocating the Blurring of Faces at Protests – PhotoShelter Blog

    No, Photojournalists Aren’t Advocating the Blurring of Faces at Protests
    In this episode of Vision Slightly Blurred, Sarah Jacobs and Allen Murabayashi discuss the ethics of showing protestor faces, the 17-year old who filmed the killing of George Floyd, John Edwin Mason’s essay on protest photos, the controversy at the Pittsburgh-Gazette and more!
  • Photojournalists Assaulted During 2020 Protests – PhotoShelter Blog

    Photojournalists Assaulted During 2020 Protests
    This is a rolling list of assaults against photojournalists by police and protestors covering the George Floyd protests around the country. Some of the data is pulled from the Freedom of the Press Foundation’s list. This list does not include detainment without assault.
  • Police Target Journalists as Trump Blames ‘Lamestream Media’ for Protests – The New York Times

    Barbara Davidson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist, was covering a protest near the Grove shopping mall in Los Angeles on Saturday when a police officer ordered her to move.
  • Attacks on media covering the protests are simply following the president’s rhetoric – Poynter

    Attacks on media covering the protests are simply following the president’s rhetoric
    For his entire administration, Trump has continually bashed the media — calling it “lamestream” and “fake news” and, worse of all, “the enemy of the people.” Perhaps then it should come as no surprise that the media was a target for violence and attacks all over the nation during its coverage of the protests.
  • Photojournalists Attacked and Arrested at Protests Around the Country – PhotoShelter Blog

    Photojournalists Attacked and Arrested at Protests Around the Country
    In the span of less than a week, concerns about COVID-19 have taken a backseat to the nationwide protests against police brutality and racism sparked by the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmad Aubrey, and Breonna Taylor. Photojournalists covering the scenes have been confronted with violence against them by police and unknown agitators.
  • The police abuses the press. Again. – Columbia Journalism Review

    https://www.cjr.org/the_media_today/the-police-abuses-the-press-again.php
    ON FRIDAY NIGHT—as mass protests sparked by the deaths of George Floyd, in Minneapolis, and Black Americans in Kentucky, Georgia, and elsewhere convulsed America—anchors with WAVE 3 News, the NBC affiliate in Louisville, Kentucky, were conversing on air with Kaitlin Rust, a reporter who was out covering protests in the city, when Rust cried out twice. “I’m getting shot,” she shouted. Police, Rust said, were firing pepper balls at her. WAVE’s camera zoomed in on one officer, who cocked his gun and fired multiple rounds back at the camera.
  • A Reporter’s Cry on Live TV: ‘I’m Getting Shot! I’m Getting Shot!’ – The New York Times

    From a television crew assaulted by protesters to a photographer struck in the eye, journalists have found themselves targeted on the streets of America.
  • Journalists covering nights of protests and unrest found themselves under attack – Poynter

    Journalists covering nights of protests and unrest found themselves under attack
    On any given day, any one of the attacks that I mention in this column would be newsworthy. The fact that this is only a sampling of the many attacks on journalists this weekend underscores the dangers that they are willing to face to document an outpouring of anger, frustration and, in some cases, senseless opportunistic violence.
  • Inside the Early Days of China’s Coronavirus Coverup | WIRED

    https://www.wired.com/story/inside-the-early-days-of-chinas-coronavirus-coverup/
    The dawn of a pandemic—as seen through the news and social media posts that vanished from China’s internet.