World Press Photo disinvites photographer to industry awards

The World Press Photo Foundation disinvited an award-winning photographer from its annual awards ceremony Thursday following allegations of “inappropriate behavior,” according to the foundation. This is the first time in the organization’s six-decade-l

Andrew Quilty’s photographs of the aftermath of a bombing in Kabul, some of which ran in The New York Times, won third place in the Spot News, Stories category. But the photojournalist was not in Amsterdam for the ceremony. After the foundation received reports of inappropriate behavior by Quilty, organizers told the photojournalist he was not welcome at the event, according to Lars Boering, managing director of the World Press Photo Foundation. The awards are the most prestigious in photojournalism, and the ceremony in Amsterdam and subsequent photo festival is a gathering of top industry figures. The foundation has not made public the number or nature of the accusations.

Photos of War-Torn Life in Afghanistan

"The optimism of 2013 has gone."

Just a few years ago, Andrew Quilty thought he'd landed his dream job. The photographer was working for a big Australian newspaper, shooting photos that would end up splashed across the front page every other day. But that was before Afghanistan.

These Haunting Photos Reveal Today’s Afghanistan

A photographer shares his dedication to telling the story of a country that has slipped from the headlines.

Australian photographer Andrew Quilty has been photographing in Afghanistan since 2013 for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and Foreign Policy. Like many of his generation, he says, Afghanistan became part of his consciousness after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the subsequent U.S. invasion. A first trip meant to last only a few weeks turned into a few months—and beyond.

Afghan Gigs

Photojournalist Andrew Quilty on risk, common sense and insurance options for freelancers on the front lines

A freelancer’s life in Afghanistan is fraught with danger, but for photojournalist Andrew Quilty the steady flow of assignments to important global stories makes it career worth the risk

Untitled From Afghanistan

For the past year, Andrew Quilty has split his time between Sydney and Kabul, Afghanistan. Quilty tells Broadsheet about his life in the Middle East, and walking the perilous line between violence and harmony in his work.

For the past year, Andrew Quilty has split his time between Sydney and Kabul, Afghanistan. Quilty tells Broadsheet about his life in the Middle East, and walking the perilous line between violence and harmony in his work.