A New Documentary Honors the Work and Life of Photojournalist Chris Hondros

A collection of photos by and of Chris Hondros, who risked and then tragically lost his life to show the world the reality of warfare, now the subject of a new documentary film: "Hondros."

Conflict photographer Chris Hondros, working for Getty Images,  covered major events from the attacks of September 11 through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the civil war in Liberia, and the chaos of the Arab Spring in Egypt and Libya. Hondros was killed while on assignment in Libya in 2011 in an attack that also took the life of photojournalist Tim Hetherington. The attack took place while they were covering the armed uprising against the government of Muammar Qaddafi. Released over the weekend and available today online is a new documentary film titled Hondros, directed by Chris’s friend Greg Campbell, and executive produced by Jake Gyllenhaal and Jamie Lee Curtis. The powerful photographs that Hondros made speak volumes about our era, and many belong in history books. The relationships that Hondros made throughout his lifetime speak even louder, leaving an amazing legacy that—along with his images—is examined in this film. Below, a handful of photos by and of Chris Hondros, who risked and then tragically lost his life to show the world the reality of warfare.

Walking Through War: Hyperlapse Storytelling - PhotoShelter Blog

Many years ago, I had the pleasure of seeing the late Chris Hondros speak at the Eddie Adams Workshop. During his presentation, he showed an entire of sequence of images that led up to this 2005 image of a 5-year-old Samar Hassan with blood covered hands

Ten years after Hondros photographed Hassan, The New York Times published a feature entitled “Walking in War’s Path” that takes the viewer through a tour of eight different places in and around Gaza on the one year anniversary of the war. The perspective includes both Israelis and Palestinians – lives filled with destruction and fear.

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

It has been three years since photographer Chris Hondros was killed, along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington, during a firefight in Misrata, Libya, on April 20th 2011. With the recent release of Testament — a moving collection of Hondros’ photographs and writing – Getty’s Vice President/News, Pancho Bernasconi talks to TIME about one of the American conflict photographer’s most poignant and shocking images: that of a young girl who just witnessed the death of her parents in Tal Afar, Iraq.

A Stunning Testament to the Life and Work of Chris Hondros

A collection of photographs and writing by the late photojournalist Chris Hondros titled Testament, published by PowerHouse Books, has been released...

A collection of photographs and writing by the late photojournalist Chris Hondros titled Testament, published by PowerHouse Books, has been released nearly three years after Hondros was killed while on assignment in Libya. Testament includes a significant amount of Hondros’ work covering conflicts around the world beginning in the late 1990s, including those in Africa and the Middle East.

Finding Chris Hondros

Whenever Chris Hondros returned to New York City after a long assignment, it was like a roving professor holding office hours. One meeting at Caffe Reggio in Greenwich Village would morph into drinks or dinner with out-of-towners visiting Brooklyn. Friends came and went, but the discussion was always rich and lively. That’s what I miss the most about him.

The photographer who gave his life to tell the truth about Gaddafi's Libya

Award-winning photojournalist Chris Hondros was killed by a rocket-propelled grenade while covering the Libyan conflict in 2011. As a book of his images and writing is published, Jonathan Klein, CEO of Getty Images, shares his memories

Award-winning photojournalist Chris Hondros was killed by a rocket-propelled grenade while covering the Libyan conflict in 2011. As a book of his images and writing is published, Jonathan Klein, CEO of Getty Images, shares his memories

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

“War gives you meaning,” he said, “an appreciation of life, and a chemical rush.  That’s good. If anything else gave you all that, I’d be doing it every day. War is giving you these things that everyone seeks and presents it in a package. You never get those three things together in anything else. You can go skydiving but that’s not meaningful, it’s just an indulgence. War is everything.”

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

In the five years Baghdad was my home, I got to work (or just hang out) with some of the finest news photographers in the world: Yuri Kozyrev, Franco Pagetti, Kate Brooks, James Nachtwey, Robert Nicklesberg, Lynsey Addario, the late Chris Hondros… the list is as long as it is distinguished. Their immense talent and incredible bravery combined to make the Iraq war arguably the most exhaustively photographed conflict in human history. This selection doesn’t begin to capture the immensity of their collective achievement, but it is evocative of the horrors — and just occasionally, hope — they were able to chronicle.

Remembering Chris Hondros, Part IV - Reading The Pictures

We conclude our series remembering Chris Hondros: Tyler Hicks, Darren McCollester, Shannon Stapleton, James Pomerantz, and Bruno Stevens. Additional photos and videos by Tim Fadek, Mark Ovaska, and Alan Chin.

We continue our series of posts of remembrance of our friend, comrade, and brother on another sad day.

Sunday Times Dedication To Chris Hondros, Tim Hetherington

Gerry Souter was a photography student from the Art Institute who came to the work as a press photographer for the Chicago Tribune in 1964. He stayed two years. In that time, he had a view of photojournalism that we will never see again. Since that time, he has become a media consultant and prolific author, writing over 40 books with his wife Janet.      Recently he privately responded to one of my blog posts, sharing some of the history of photojournalism as practiced in Chicago about 47 years ago. It was fascinating, so I asked for a “10 Questions” interview about life as a press photographer in the early 60’s. 

Homage to a friend Chris Hondros

Several days after this tragedy, you received a phone call from Paul Wolfowitz. Even though the picture revealed Bush’s military vagrancy, the Pentagon’s Deputy Secretary of Defense admired your work and invited you to lunch to ask you how to become a war photographer.

Remembering Chris Hondros, Part III: Tal Afar - Reading The Pictures

Edward Wong of the New York Times shares the story of Chris Hondros's photographs documenting the accidental killing of Iraqi civilians by American troops in Iraq.

I didn’t know Chris well, but I saw him on a few occasions in Iraq. He was a calm, cheerful presence in the middle of a war that was growing more chaotic by the day. After I heard the awful news of his death in Libya last week, I remembered interviewing him in Baghdad about what he saw one winter night in 2005: the accidental shooting of an Iraqi family by American soldiers in Tal Afar. My notebook with the entire interview is in the U.S., but I found a memo on my computer that I had typed up afterwards. There are few better examples of his professionalism and compassion than the photos he shot that night. Chris was a strong advocate for documenting the impact of war on civilians. This is an edited version of the memo.

Chris Hondros Remembered as Humanist, Friend | PDNPulse

An estimated 800 mourners attended the April 27 memorial service for photographer Chris Hondros. The service was held at the Sacred Hearts St. Stephens Church in Brooklyn, where Hondros and his fiancée had planned to hold their wedding this August.  Hondr

In his homily, Father Anthony J. Sansone described Hondros as a “prophetic humanist.” Sansone, who had recently counseled Hondros and his fiancée, Christina Piaia, in preparation for their wedding, said Hondros worked to document “the suffering and the heartbroken” out of a sense of conscience and a commitment to making the public aware of perspectives beyond their own.

Remembering Chris Hondros, Part II - Reading The Pictures

Alan Chin, Scout Tufankjian, and Stephanie Sinclair share their memories of Chris Hondros.

During the war in Kosovo, Tyler Hicks was driving a battered old Renault we were renting, with five or six of us crammed into it lurching around the streets of Pristina. Hondros was holding Tyler’s bag with computer and camera inside. Suddenly a faulty lock popped the door open and the bag flew out and thudded onto the cobblestones. Tyler asked, “What was that?” and Chris responded, “Oh, I think that was your Leica, man.” Luckily we backtracked and found everything intact. That’s how I first met Chris Hondros twelve years ago.