Chris Killip: The Station and a Note of Gratitude

"Killip was a human first and an observer or lucid chronicler second" Chris Killip is known for his immeasurable and singular vision of Britain during the 70’s 80’s and 90's. To place emphasis on his work in a genre-fied manner would belittle his an

Chris Killip is known for his immeasurable and singular vision of Britain during the 70’s 80’s and 90’s. To place emphasis on his work in a genre-fied manner would belittle his and its true humanity and potential. Killip was a human first and an observer or lucid chronicler second. In my personal estimation his book In Flagrante and its subsequent version In Flagrante II along with Seacoal are two of the more enduring works of the past 100 years of publishing within the medium of photography. Once you crack the covers of these works, it is hard not to be left with a sense of urgent sympathy for the people and the timeframe in which it was produced.

Chris Killip on his timeless portrait of working class punk culture

For decades, Chris Killip forgot about his photographs of an old Gateshead punk club. But today, they’ve taken on brand new meaning.

For three decades, the seminal photographer’s shots of an old anarcho-punk club sat gathering dust in a box. However, in the cold light of day they’ve taken on new meaning.

A Fascinating Portrait of the Working-Class in Northern England in the 1970s and 1980s - Feature Shoot

Father and Son Watching a Parade, West End, Newcastle; Chris Killip (British, born 1946); Newcastle, England; negative 1980; print 1986; Gelatin silver print Helen and Her Hula-hoop, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth,…

North England as presented by Manx photographer and Harvard professor Chris Killip is bleak not only for the lack of colour, but for the immediacy at which it hits the viewer that the subjects reside in a world where there are no prospects. Work, for those who work hard, is often intrinsically entangled with one’s identity. When an industry ceases to exist, for its former workers it’s literally like being lost in the fog that so often hangs like a weight behind the protagonists of Chris’ photographs.

Deutsche Börse Announces Shortlist for 2013 Photography Prize | PDNPulse

The four finalists for the 2013 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize, which comes with a 30,000 pound (about $48,000 US) award, have been announced. They are: Mishka Henner, Cristina de Middel, Chris Killip and the duo of Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin. T

"Mishka Henner, Cristina de Middel, Chris Killip and the duo of Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin"

Chris Killip & Graham Smith: "Another Country" (1985)

Helen and Hula-Hoop, Seacoal Beach, Lynemouth, Tyneside, UK, 1984 by Chris Killip His affection for the land and its people never blinded him to the toughness of ordinary existence. By Richard Cork, Review of Another Country at Serpentine Galler

The unease is so pervasive in Killip’s work that his one scene of full-blooded enjoyment also turns out to be the most sinister in in implications. Concert, Sunderland is the terse title for an extraordinary image, where the flashlight illuminates a tangle of semi-naked figures presumably swaying to the music. One shaven-headed dancer, his ear pierced with a variety of rinp and pins, lurches to the left and bunches his hand into a fist. Another figure, stripped to the waist and baring the word ‘Angelic’ under his nipple, dives towards his neighbours like a rugby player barging into a scrum