Ben Smith — A Small Voice Podcast — 070 – Christopher Anderson

Christopher Anderson was born in Canada in 1970 and grew up in west Texas, USA. In 2000, on assignment for the New York Times Magazine, he boarded a small wooden boat with 44 Haitians trying to sail to America. The boat sank in the Caribbean. The photographs earned Christopher the Robert Capa Gold Medal and marked the beginning of a 10 period as a contract photographer for Newsweek Magazine and National Geographic Magazine. In 2011 he became New York Magazine’s first ever Photographer in Residence.  Christopher joined Magnum Photos in 2005, he is the author of four monographs and is currently based in Barcelona, Spain

Christopher Anderson | The Photographic Journal

These photographs offer a portrait of America the way it really was for me as I lived it and documented it from 1969, when I turned 18 and first began to identify myself as a photographer, through President Nixon s resignation in 1974, which many consider the true end of the decade.

Review: Stump by Christopher Anderson

It’s almost as if there is a gentleman’s agreement (remember, politics still is dominated by men): journalists report the spectacle faithfully, not attempting to subvert the game, but the slips are fair game.

Christopher Anderson's Beautiful Reflection on Fathers and Fatherhood - Feature Shoot

It's a well-established fact that the birth of a child changes everything. For Brooklyn-based photographer Christopher Anderson, having his son not only impacted his daily existence but radically altered the course of his career.

It’s a well-established fact that the birth of a child changes everything. For Brooklyn-based photographer Christopher Anderson, having his son not only impacted his daily existence but radically altered the course of his career. Son, published by Kehrer Verlag, shows this shift

Book Review: Stump

Book Review Stump By Christopher Anderson Reviewed by Colin Pantall There’s a section in Oliver Sacks’ book, The Man Who Mistoo...

Christopher Anderson’s Stump. It’s a book of faces, all of which were taken at American presidential primaries and political conventions over the previous 6 years. The pictures are, for the most part, full faces show in in extreme close up, clipped nose hairs and all. They say that politics is show business for the ugly and never was that more true than in Stump

Revisit Christopher Anderson’s Capitolio

In the wake of Hugo Chavez's death, it seems appropriate to take a look back at Christopher Anderson's Capitolio, "a cinematic journey through the shadows of Caracas, Venezuela during 'revolution.'" The book, although published four years ago, remains a relevant and poignent capturing of a vibrant city "ripping apart at the seams under the stress of popular unrest."

Interview with Christopher Anderson

He is a member of Magnum Photos and is currently the New York Magazine’s first ever photographer-in-residence.

Sometimes I get overwhelmed by the flood of imagery and not just bad imagery because there are, of course, lot of bad images. How can my images find an audience through all that noise? The only answer I can find, maybe it is about authenticity. If there is something that someone connects with, that’s because there is not just good and bad photography but because there is some authentic quality to it. It’s a picture that is distinctly mine and maybe that has some value above being classified as good or bad.

Worth a look: Christopher Anderson’s portraits from the RNC and DNC

Christopher Anderson’s, of Magnum and staff photographer for New York magazine, photos are always inventive and cut deep into his subject matter. His portraits from the Republican and Democratic National Conventions this week and last for New York magazine are my favorite coverage of the political conventions, and they look like no one else’s

Christopher Anderson

In this episode of Picture Perfect, VICE visits Magnum photographer Christopher Anderson at his studio in Brooklyn to talk about some of his past work and the life-changing experience of boarding a handmade boat that sank in the Caribbean. He tells us that his current project of photographing New York is part of his artistic growth and an effort to turn inward. As we follow him on assignment, Anderson explains that he’s not just focused on the task at hand, but also interested in the way his photographs build upon each other through the years.

A Conversation with Christopher Anderson (2012)

From 'Son' by Christopher Anderson Why show it ? Interview with Christopher Anderson By Baptiste Lignel, December 2, 2012, Paris Baptiste Lignel- You seem to have a dilemma about your project “Son”… Cristopher Anderson – I’m constantly confli

I’ve spent the last fifteen years with the title of “War photographer”, going to the other ends of the earth, to photographs stories of other people, looking for photographic intimacy from people that I didn’t know. In Afghanistan, which could not be further away from what I grew up in, which was milk and toast Texas. My father was an evangelical preacher, and I grew up in a very conservative and religious environment. My family is not right wing, born again, or that kind of thing, but the environment, the town, the culture that I grew up in were conservative, and I became a photographer, really, to escape that. Then all of sudden you have a child, which is a crazy experience, because it is at the same time the most intimate and unique experience a person can have, and it is also the most common and universal experience a person can have. Then I was having this internal dialogue: “I’ve been going off to Afghanistan, and now I’ve come the full circle, where I’m not running away from home anymore, I want to be at my home. I want to understand myself through my family”.

Christopher Anderson- Return of the Staff Photographer - A Photo Editor

by Grayson Schaffer On Tuesday, New York Magazine announced that it had signed longtime contributor and well-known photojournalist Christopher Anderson as the weekly magazine’s first-ever “photographer-in-residence.” In a statement released to the British

On Tuesday, New York Magazine announced that it had signed longtime contributor and well-known photojournalist Christopher Anderson as the weekly magazine’s first-ever “photographer-in-residence.” In a statement released to the British Journal of Photography, New York said the 41-year-old Brooklyn-based shooter would tackle a “broad array of subjects in a full range of styles, from photojournalism to portraiture to conceptual work.” Anderson will now work exclusively for New York, at least where print magazines are concerned. The odd thing, here, is that the era of the staff photographer was supposed to have ended when National Geographic gradually moved away from the practice. We called Anderson to try and make sense of the sudden turn of events.

LOOK3 2011: Christopher Anderson On Working Close to Home | PDNPulse

Christopher Anderson opened the morning program of Masters Talks today at LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph in Charlottesville, VA, in front of a packed crowd at the Paramount Theater downtown. Anderson is exhibiting his latest body of work, “Son,” at the

Christopher Anderson opened the morning program of Masters Talks today at LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph in Charlottesville, VA, in front of a packed crowd at the Paramount Theater downtown.

Father, Son, Husband, War Photographer

With a three-year-old son to think about, Christopher Anderson steps away from conflict photography.

Christopher Anderson’s “Son” is indeed a love poem to his wife, Marion Durand (a photo editor at Newsweek); their three-year-old son, Atlas; and Mr. Anderson’s father, Lynn.

Interview: Magnum Photographer Publishes Photobook for iPad

In 2009, Magnum Photographer Christopher Anderson released his beautiful photobook, Capitolio, capturing the tumultuous upheavals of Caracas, Venezuela under Hugo Chavez. Less than two years later,…

In 2009, Magnum Photographer Christopher Anderson released his beautiful photobook, Capitolio, capturing the tumultuous upheavals of Caracas, Venezuela under Hugo Chavez. Almost two years later, as first print run copies dwindle, the publishing world is a very different place. The digital age that has long since transformed music, video and media distribution and consumption is now dramatically sweeping into long form books, with media and tablet readers. The last bastion of physical media is still and was always destined to be high-quality image reproduction, embodied in the photobook. But as the march of digital overthrow prepares its final coup de grâce, Anderson asked himself what form this will take. How will audiences be consuming photobooks in the digital age? This week, he’s launching his answer to that question, with the first photobook reproduced as an iPad app. We recently interviewed Anderson on his thought process behind the book’s launch, and how he sees the future of high-end photography reproduction.

Christopher Anderson

Combining the zine ethic and media-savvy dynamism of FIGJAM street culture with the networking energy of its Perth-based creator Mark McPherson, Hijacked 1 is a compelling trawl through contemporary US and Australian photographic practice.

Magnum's Christopher Anderson on QTV

My first reaction to Dutch photographer Otto Snoek’s new book, Why Not, was that Rotterdam was off my travel list. Even so, it’s immediately evident that Mr. Snoek is a master of urban street photography, and after further consideration, Rotterdam represents many contemporary urban centers that draw residents from all over the world. Snoek’s style is similar to Martin Parr, but his subject matter is more universal. He synthesizes many things at once—compassion, humor, and an acute ability to observe human behavior.