National Geographic Photographers on What Photo Editors Really Do | PDNPulse

In the video, photographers and photo editors explain a bit about the how the photographer-editor relationship works at National Geographic.

“I’m pretty sure most people have no idea what a photo editor actually does,” says photographer David Guttenfelder at the beginning of this short video recently published by National Geographic. In the video, photographers and photo editors explain a bit about the how the photographer-editor relationship works at National Geographic. “It’s a complete partnership,” says Erika Larsen. “It’s just as personal to them as it is to me.”

90 Days in 90 Seconds: Follow a National Geographic Photographer

Want to experience the life of a National Geographic photographer? While on assignment for the magazine, photographer David Guttenfelder shot one second

Want to experience the life of a National Geographic photographer? While on assignment for the magazine, photographer David Guttenfelder shot one second of video per day over 90 days. Those tiny clips were then combined into the 90-second video above.

A photojournalist finds new purpose

It was the longest David Guttenfelder had been away from North Korea in four years. Last June, the Iowa native and former chief Asia photographer for The Associated Press joined National Geographic and returned to the US to start the second act of his

Ninety Days in Ninety Seconds—A Photographer’s Journey in the Blink of an Eye

David Guttenfelder is a National Geographic photographer who is used to spending countless days on the road. While most people think of it as a dream job, the reality can be a lot more complex. So to share what it actually feels like to be on assignment,

David Guttenfelder is a National Geographic photographer who is used to spending countless days on the road. While most people think of it as a dream job, the reality can be a lot more complex. So to share what it actually feels like to be on assignment, he made a video with a unique approach.

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

“We launched Everyday DPRK because a number of photographers who have access to the country are using Instagram,” says Guttenfelder, “but most of them were not getting attention on their own.”

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

After Guttenfelder left AP, with an unmatched portfolio spanning two decades, Wong Maye-E accepted an offer to become the outlet’s lead photographer there. (AP opened a full bureau in downtown Pyongyang in 2012.)

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

“After all this time at AP, it was only natural to try something new,” says Guttenfelder. “Our industry is changing a lot and it’s exciting and confusing at the same time. But there are a lot of innovations happening, and I’d been thinking for a while that I’d like to test myself in this new world. After 20 years, I thought I’d give the second half of my career a try.”

Snapshots from a secret state: Panoramic pictures of North Koreans at work and play give an extraordinary glimpse of everyday life

Award-winning photographer David Guttenfelder, has made a dozen trips into North Korea since 2000, trying to capture the country as accurately as possible for outsiders.

"For this project, I used a Hasselblad XPAN, a panoramic-view film camera that is no longer manufactured. Throughout the year, I wore it around my neck and shot several dozen rolls of color negative film in between my normal coverage of news and daily life with my AP-issued digital cameras. The XPAN is quiet, discrete, manual and simple. Because it has a wide panoramic format, it literally gives me a different view of North Korea. The film also reflects how I feel when I'm in North Korea, wandering among the muted or gritty colors, and the fashions and styles that often seem to come from a past generation. "

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

Although he is accompanied by a guide wherever he goes and has to request in advance where he wants to go, the daily life photographs that he has taken—often one-off shots made on the way to or from an event—provide a stark contrast to the highly orchestrated government news-agency photos that are more commonly seen out of North Korea.

Photos That Move and Flow — Underwater

David Doubilet says it’s much more difficult to make a perfect photo underwater than on land. “When you put your head in the water,” he said, “everything changes.” His work will soon be featured at Look3.

“You’re after a feeling, a moment, almost a wistfulness,” Mr. Doubilet said. “You have to think poetically.”

David Guttenfelder, Ambassador - Reading The Pictures

I imagine the North Koreans look at these factory shots and feel that Guttenfelder is paying them respect, capturing an ethic of hard work and industry, perhaps believing also that the photos must counter perceptions the country is barely scraping by.

I imagine it’s reasonable, at this point, to consider AP photographer David Guttenfelder an ambassador. After so many visits to North Korea (and so many thoughtful images), he has gained their trust and, with it, an unusual degree of access. What’s special and fascinating, though, is the way his wonderful photos apparently represent so differently to the (very sensitive) powers-that-be in that culture as compared to how they read to us in the West.

New Show Celebrates Opening of A.P. Pyongyang News Bureau

David Guttenfelder is now the only Western photographer able to photograph on a regular basis there. He has used all of his extensive talents – and added a new one: acting as an unofficial diplomat between North Korea and the United States. “I represent the U.S. and the outside world to them,” he said. “But the big responsibility is representing them to the outside world through my pictures – to understand what I see, to try to be as fair as I can and to dig as deep as I can.”

Japan Earthquake: Photographing the aftermath

As the scale of the devastation became apparent, dozens of other photographers packed their bags and headed to Japan too, including Magnum Photos’ Dominic Nahr, VII Photo’s James Natchwey, Paula Bronstein of Getty Images and Associated Press’ David Guttenfelder. Panos Pictures photographer Adam Dean arrived in Tokyo just 20 hours after the earthquake hit – and was shocked by what he found. “I am working with a writer out here and between the two of us, we’ve covered earthquakes in China, Pakistan and Indonesia, cyclones in Burma and tsunamis in Thailand, India and Sri Lanka, wars in Afghanistan and Iraq as well as undercover reporting trips to North Korea and Burma,” he tells BJP. “But from a logistical point of view this has been one of the hardest assignments we’ve had to cover.”