15 Photographers on How Imagination Shapes Their Work

Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

From the Magnum Square Print Sale in Partnership with Aperture, Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

11 Photographers on How To Finish a Body of Work

When should you bring a photographic project to an end? LaToya Ruby Frazier, Justine Kurland, Alec Soth, and more reflect on how to know when a series of work is complete.

Over the course of her career, curator and lecturer Sasha Wolf has heard countless young photographers say they often feel adrift in their own practices, wondering if they are doing it the “right” way. This inspired her to seek out insights from a wide range of photographers about their approaches to making photographs and a sustained a body of work, which are brought together in PhotoWork: Forty Photographers on Process and Practice. Structured as a Proust-like questionnaire, the responses from both established and newly emerging photographers reveal that there is no single path. Below, eleven artists respond to the question: How do you know when a body of work is finished?

12 Photographers on How They Conceptualize Their Work

What comes first–the idea for a project, or the images themselves?

Over the course of her career, curator and lecturer Sasha Wolf has heard countless young photographers say they often feel adrift in their own practices, wondering if they are doing it the “right” way. She was inspired to seek insight from a wide range of photographers about their approaches to making photographs, and, more important, a sustained body of work. Their responses are compiled in PhotoWork: Forty Photographers on Process and Practice. Below, twelve artists respond to the first question in the interview series:

Dawoud Bey, Rosalind Fox Solomon, Shahidul Alam Win 2019 Infinity Awards | PDNPulse

The Lifetime Achievement Award will go to Rosalind Fox Solomon at the ICP gala to be held April 2. Shahidul Alam, who was jailed108 days in 2018, will receive a Special Presentation.

The International Center of Photography has announced the winners of its 2019 Infinity Awards. Rosalind Fox Solomon will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award. Dawoud Bey will receive the award for Art. The Emerging Photographer award will go to Jess T. Dugan, who studied with Bey at Columbia College Chicago and last year published her portraits of older transgender and gender non-conforming adults in the book To Survive on This Shore. The awards will be presented at a gala on April 2 in New York City.

Dawoud Bey: 40 Years of Photos Affirming the ‘Lives of Ordinary Black People’

A new retrospective book “Seeing Deeply” reveals his decades-long exploration of community, memory and photography.

As a socially conscious teenager, Dawoud Bey was intrigued by the controversy over the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 1969 exhibition, “Harlem on My Mind: Cultural Capital of Black America, 1900-1968.” The show featured photos, audio and text about daily life in Harlem. It did not, however, include paintings, drawings or sculptures by African-American artists, which sparked protests organized by the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition. Mr. Bey, then 16, went on his own to the museum, hoping to see the picket lines and find out more, but when he arrived there were none that day.
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Perspective | ‘A radical reshaping of the world is possible, one person at a time’: Dawoud Bey on being awarded a MacArthur genius grant

Photographer Dawoud Bey speaks to In Sight about being awarded a MacArthur genius grant.

“Receiving the MacArthur Fellowship is a tremendous affirmation and validation of the work I have been doing for the past 40 years. It affirms that the things I have worked to achieve with my work have considerable value to others in the field. My ongoing project has been to make work that engages the human community in a conversation with itself through making works of young people and African Americans and then situating those photographs in museums and galleries where other significant art objects exist.

Dawoud Bey | 2017 MacArthur Fellow - A Photo Editor

Having spent 15 years photographing child marriages around the world, Stephanie Sinclair is uniquely positioned to understand its lasting impact on communities and, especially, on the girls who were forced to wed against their will. “You can’t expect individuals who have been through significant abuse to just act normal as soon as they get out of that situation,” she said. “They need to be nurtured, to be given the time and the tools to heal.”

On the Streets of Harlem, a Sense of 'Erase and Replace'

Dawoud Bey’s large-scale photos of Harlem show the legendary cradle of African-American life confronting speculation, displacement and gentrification.

Dawoud Bey’s large-scale color photographs of Harlem vividly document a bustling and rapidly transforming neighborhood: a verdant Marcus Garvey Park; construction sites popping up for more luxury housing; street vendors hawking hats and used clothing; posters of black women’s hairstyles in the window of a hair weave distributor adjacent to a vacant lot; faded paper covering the windows of the legendary — and shuttered — Lenox Lounge; and white tourists intent on hearing gospel music waiting outside the Abyssinian Baptist Church.

Lucie Awards Honor Lifetime Achievements | PDNPulse

Eli Reed, Bill Eppridge, Dawoud Bey and Rich Clarkson were among the veteran photographers honored for their contributions to photography at the 2011 Lucie Awards, held October 24 in New York City. In accepting the award for Achievement in Photojournalism

Eli Reed, Bill Eppridge, Dawoud Bey and Rich Clarkson were among the veteran photographers honored for their contributions to photography at the 2011 Lucie Awards, held October 24 in New York City.

Wooster Collective: USA Network Brings Together 11 World-Renowned Photographers For Character Project

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In addition to Mary Ellen Mark, the project features new work by Sylvia Plachy as well as Dawoud Bey, Jeff Dunas, David Eustace, Eric Ogden and emerging talents Marla Rutherford, Anna Mia Davidson, Joe Fornabaio, Eric McNatt and Richard Renaldi.

Check it out here.