15 Photographers on How Imagination Shapes Their Work

Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

From the Magnum Square Print Sale in Partnership with Aperture, Dawoud Bey, Nan Goldin, KangHee Kim and more reflect on the photograph's potential to influence social and artistic images.

The Documentary Photography Issue VII: Home, reimagined

It feels as if our relationship with the idea of home is changing.  Across the world, nationalism finds itself dancing freely with far-right politics, while political divisions have chopped families right down the middle, transforming previously tight-kni

‘Home’ is both a physical and imagined space – a state and place of belonging. In our annual celebration of visual storytelling, join us as we spotlight the photographers capturing it in all of its wildly different guises.

Kevin Frayer, Diana Markosian Win Chris Hondros Fund Awards

"Chris Hondros was the consummate photojournalist," says Kevin Frayer

When photojournalist Chris Hondros was killed in Libya four years ago, he left behind a legacy of award-winning images that continue to inspire photographers today. “It’s the kind of work that so many of our generation of photographers would aspire to do,” says Kevin Frayer, a Canadian photojournalist. “He was prolific in his excellence.”

Estranged Photographer and Father Reunite, Collaborate on Series About Their Relationship - Feature Shoot

Diàna Markosian grew up knowing little about her father. In photo albums compiled by her mother, he was either cropped out of the frame altogether, or left as a ghostly profile. She had last seen him when she was 7 years old, just before her mother took h

Diàna Markosian grew up knowing little about her father. In photo albums compiled by her mother, he was either cropped out of the frame altogether or left as a ghostly profile. Markosian last saw him when she was just 7 years old, her mother taking she and her brother from their family home in Moscow to the United States. Thereafter he was rarely mentioned. But several years ago Markosian set out to discover who her father was, tracking him down at his home in Armenia. Together they embarked on a collaborative photo project, Inventing My Father.

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

When Diana Markosian was 7 years old, her mother left her father and took Markosian and her brother from their home in Moscow to start a new life in California. “We hardly ever spoke of my father,” Markosian says. “I had no pictures of him, and over time forgot what he looked like.”

Burmese Nights

Diana Markosian's photographs of separatist conflict in Burma's Kachin State.

The photographer Diana Markosian recently travelled to Kachin State, a remote region in northern Burma that has played host to an anti-government insurgency for the past five decades.

Diana Markosian – My Father the Stranger

Diana Markosian My Father The Stranger [ EPF 2013 RECIPIENT ] I knocked on the door of a stranger. I’ve traveled halfway around the world to meet him. My father. I was seven years old when I …

This is my attempt to piece together a clearer picture of a familiar stranger.

A Daughter's Search for an Invisible Presence

At age 7, Diana Markosian would look at the sky and wonder if her father was on each passing plane. Years later, she went in search of him, seeking answers in adulthood that she never got as a child.

When Diana Markosian was 7, she would stand outside her strange new home in Southern California and look toward the sky as each airplane passed overhead, wondering if her father would be on that plane. Or the next one.