The Vietnam War, Part III: Hands of a Nation

The photojournalist Eddie Adams, who covered the Vietnam War for the Associated Press, not only captured the action and chaos but took the time to get up close to the Vietnamese people whenever he could.

The photojournalist Eddie Adams, who covered the Vietnam War for the Associated Press, not only captured the action and chaos but took the time to get up close to the Vietnamese people whenever he could. In 1968, he undertook a project called "Hands of a Nation," taking intimate photos of the hands of Vietnamese soldiers and civilians

Eddie Adams: 10 Years On, and War Will Never Be the Same

A decade after the death of Eddie Adams, does photojournalism risk being supplanted by propaganda or fabricated images?

Maybe our profession and our leaders have failed to protect and preserve the critical role independent war photography plays in our lives and history. And now we have allowed it to fall into the wrong hands.

INTERVIEW: “Robert Farber with Eddie Adams”

Eddie Adams: I’m not one to give up negative advice like a lot of picture editors do. I think that there’s a lot of room, for anyone who’s really serious about this and who first of all to be successful in anything–and in photography it’s gonna hurt. You’re gonna cry, you’re gonna have your heart ripped out, but just don’t give up. If you have the will and the time and are really serious about this, the most important thing is you have to want it bad enough. If you want it bad enough, you’ll get good, and get to where you want to go.

The Pulitzer Eddie Adams Didn't Want

Indeed, the reason for his seemingly inexplicable feelings remained a mystery until just recently. His widow, Alyssa Adams, donated his archive to the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin on the fifth anniversary of Eddie’s death. The archive includes more than 50 years’ worth of material from a journalist who covered 13 wars, six American presidents and nearly every major film star. With his family’s permission, Alison M. Beck of the Briscoe Center allowed me an advance peek into the archive as the staff categorized 200 linear feet of slides, negatives, prints, audio and video materials, diaries, notes and tear sheets. Everything captured my interest, but Eddie’s journals were the gems.

What the Still Photo Still Does Best

Thoughts on the enduring power of photojournalism — and on the death of Charles Moore, one of its great practitioners.

The unsettling images from civil rights battlegrounds, followed closely by the disturbing images from Vietnam battlefields by Horst Faas, Eddie Adams, Nick Ut and others, created a golden era for photojournalism. Today, everyone with a cellphone is a photographer/videographer and streaming video has become a national obsession. But has the proliferation of images devalued photojournalism and dulled its influence?

A documentary looks at prize-winning photographer Eddie Adams – Los Angeles Times

“An Unlikely Weapon” closely examines the life of Adams, who died in 2004 at age 71, having covered 13 wars, working for the Associated Press, Time and Parade, while enjoying private portrait sessions with such leaders and luminaries as Bill Clinton, Fidel Castro and Pope John Paul II. He photographed the iconic image of Clint Eastwood in 1992 for his “Unforgiven” movie poster and in the ’70s shot nude pictorials for Penthouse.

Check it out here.