What Inge Morath Saw: A Unique Sense of Style

The photographer Inge Morath, who was also the wife of Arthur Miller, had an eye for style — on the street and on film sets, at galas and on runways.

Inge Morath was not a fashion photographer. But Ms. Morath, a Magnum Photos photographer, captured — and demonstrated — a rich sense of style. Her poetic and somewhat theatrical depiction of elegance is the centerpiece of a new book, “Inge Morath: On Style,” by Justine Picardie (Abrams).

The Unmistakable Style of Inge Morath, One of Magnum’s First Female Photographers

Inge Morath may have frequently photographed well-dressed people and many figures of the fashion world, but to call her a fashion photographer would be...

Rather than “the seasonal changes of attire,” the motif running through Morath’s best work was, he notes, “the endurance of the human creative spirit in conditions of transformation and duress.”

Danube Revisited

Eight female photographers set out to follow Inge Morath’s path along the Danube for five weeks.

This week, eight female photographers set out to follow Morath’s path along the Danube for five weeks. The photographers, each of whom has won Magnum’s Inge Morath Award, converted a truck into a mobile gallery space that they are using to exhibit Morath’s work in the villages and towns she photographed

A River Changes Young Women's Photography, and Their Lives

More than half a century since Inge Morath photographed the Danube, nine young female photographers will follow her footsteps and add to her legacy.

It was not about gaining access, although to some, the idea of a young female photojournalist getting visas for six communist states that bordered the river might have seemed daunting. For Inge Morath, the panic was something else.

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Inge Morath made her first trip along the Danube River in 1958, but was unable to complete the journey then. Not until the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1989, would she successfully cross the borders that, during the 1950s, politics had made impassable to most photojournalists. Thus, the first trip, as she later wrote, “turned into many trips. Shorter or longer ones depending on bureaucratic whims and my pecuniary situation.”

Inge Morath: In living colour

At Magnum, where black and white photography reigned supreme, Inge Morath's wonderful colour work remained hidden… until now. Susanna Rustin reports

At Magnum, where black and white photography reigned supreme, Inge Morath's wonderful colour work remained hidden… until now