Photographing the 10 Year Anniversary of Japan's Fukushima Nuclear Accident - PhotoShelter Blog

James Whitlow Delano traveled to Sendai, Japan to capture images of a region battered by a tsunami and nuclear reactor meltdown on the 10 year anniversary.

Photojournalist and Founder of @everydayclimatechange James Whitlow Delano has lived and worked in Tokyo for decades, and has covered the disaster, its aftermath, and the glacially slow rebuild. For the 10th anniversary of the tragic event, Delano created a haunting photo and video package for the New York Times. I reached out to him via email to learn more about his experiences.

James Whitlow Delano – The Little People: Equatorial Rainforest Project

James Whitlow Delano The Little People: Equatorial Rainforest Project In the Eden-like rainforests that once clothed the equator, multinational corporations are quietly stealing the resources of po…

This is exactly what has happened in Borneo, where indigenous Dayak peoples have found themselves unable to enter forests their ancestors have hunted in for a millennium or more because a bureaucrat in an office in a city far away has given over the title to their ancestral homeland to a politically-connected corporation.

James Whitlow Delano - Fifth Dispatch: Slash Cameroon's Rainforest and Lose Ancestor's Souls - Reading The Pictures

In this longread and photojournal for BagNews Originals, photographer James Whitlow Delano details the impact of multinational logging and palm oil operations on the people and rainforest of Cameroon.

In this longread and photojournal for BagNews Originals, photographer James Whitlow Delano details the impact of multinational logging and palm oil operations on the people and rainforest of Cameroon. In previous posts in the series, he details the devastation of the rainforest in Malaysia and Indonesia and the impact on indigenous tribes resulting largely from the corporate cultivation of palm oil. In Suriname, he documents the social and environmental effect of intensive international mining operations.

James Whitlow Delano - Fourth Dispatch: My Odyssey to Learn What Gold Wreaked on Suriname - Reading The Pictures

In this longread and photojournal for BagNews Originals, photographer James Whitlow Delano chronicles the influx of foreigners, the ecological toxification and the adverse cultural effects of intensive mining in Suriname.

In this longread and photojournal for BagNews Originals, photographer James Whitlow Delano chronicles his investigations in Suriname. In previous posts in the series, he details the devastation of the rainforest in Malaysia and Indonesia and the impact on indigenous tribes resulting largely from the corporate cultivation of palm oil. In Suriname, the influx of foreigners, the ecological toxification and the adverse cultural effects are largely the result of intensive mining spurred by international conglomerates.

James Whitlow Delano – Third Dispatch: Tribes Losing Rain Forest Battle to the Logging Conglomerates

The Baram River, the jungle thoroughfare for the indigenous Dayak peoples, snakes through the last great forest in Southeast Asia, the interior forest of Borneo, and into Penan territory.  Not long ago, the Baram River and its tributaries were the only way for tribes like the Kelibits and the Penans to travel to the coast from Long Lellang.  For a couple of decades, tons of top soil, mostly washed away because of intensive logging operations, have turned the waters the color of cafe latte.

James Whitlow Delano - First Dispatch: Return to the Rainforest - Reading The Pictures

Over the months ahead, I want to make some sense about how a long-term project on the needless destruction of the equatorial rainforest came to be an obsession and how I have attempted to visually portray this form of daylight robbery.

Over the months ahead, I want to make some sense about how a long- term project on the needless destruction of the equatorial rainforest came to be an obsession and how I have attempted to visually portray this form of daylight robbery. I also hope that a few good nuggets of advice can be carried away from these dispatches.

What Does Mercy Look Like?

James Whitlow Delano sought an answer — many answers — and is raising money for hospice and palliative care in the process, as Niko Koppel reports.

Mercy is commonly defined as compassion, forgiveness, kindness or an act of piety. But photographs of prisoners reaching through bars, a wrestler being contorted by masked men and an infant dressed for burial are among the many interpretations of the word in the book “The Mercy Project/Inochi,” created and curated by James Whitlow Delano.

Worth a look: 100eyes – China: The Past is a Foreign Place | dvafoto

the talented group of photographers that comprise this issue: James Whitlow Delano, Markel Redondo, Katharina Hesse, Ryan Pyle, Xiqi Yuang, Wayne Liu, Carolyn Drake, Rian Dundon, Tim Franco, Eric Guo, Christian Als and Holly Wilmeth, M. Scott Brauer

Showcase: A Thirsting Planet – Lens

Carrying a Leica with a 35-millimeter lens, James Whitlow Delano photographs fast and unobtrusively. He says that photography is part of his D.N.A. “I am moved by light,” he said. “I like to tell stories. There is this need to travel and learn that I have been lucky enough to indulge.”

James Whitlow Delano – From the "Train of Death" to the "Wall of Shame"

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Much has been made of the perils undocumented workers face crossing the southern border of the United States in search of work and a better life. For Central Americans, the U.S. border marks the end of one of the longest, most treacherous migrations on the planet. Still there has been a rise of 50 percent of undocumented Central Americans from Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras living in the U.S. since 2000.

Check it out here.

James Whitlow Delano | Photographer | Japan | Raw Take

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Deb and I had the good fortune to cross paths with James Whitlow Delano because of the Blue Planet Run book and Redux Pictures. His images of China’s desertification caught our eye for the book (They didn’t make the final edit). But more than the subject of the photographs, it was the tone, the feeling and what they convey that held our interest.
I’ve always thought that the highest standard for photojournalism is to create images that serve the publishing environment for the day but that remain relevant beyond the day. Another way of saying this is to make images that are as at home on a museum wall as they are on a page.
James’ photos linger in the mind and the eye.
We were able to catch up with James just before he traveled from his home in Japan.

Check it out here.