Tag: John Stanmeyer

Honoring the creation of VII Photo Agency – The Eye of Photography

Perpignan, Visa pour l’image festival, September 8, 2001. For a few years, a certain gloom reigns over the world of photojournalism, in seemingly continuous decline. Then, however, a group of seven photojournalists– Alexandra Boulat, Ron Haviv, Gary Knight, Antonin Kratochvil, Christopher Morris, James Nachtwey, and John Stanmeyer– announced the formation of VII, a traditional photo agency based on the global Web.

Link:
http://www.loeildelaphotographie.com/en/2017/04/10/article/159945957/honoring-the-creation-of-vii-photo-agency/

Meditation On The Death Of A Hero

As we walked the streets, I noticed a certain type of photographer that stood in contrast to the sophisticated, mature practioners like Tim or our other luncheon mates, John Stanmeyer, Ami Vitale, David Strick, Jack Picone and others. It seemed to me this group was like a pack of roving jackals. There was a certain aggressive energy, wildness and a willingness to do whatever it takes to get the job done. This subset of photographers spoke about wanting to change the world, but their words sounded somewhat disingenuous. They wanted the thrill of danger, the clarity that comes when Life faces Death; the hunt, the kill. Their giant cameras slung around their necks while strolling around the peaceful streets of this French city were like bazookas, and shooting was an act of aggression for them.

Link:
http://www.nppa.org/news_and_events/news/2011/06/meditation.html

Amazon Ablaze – John Stanmeyer, VII

The Amazon Rainforest located in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil is ablaze like never before. The surge in burning can be attributed to the extreme rise in commodity prices. As demand for more food grain is needed, farmers are pushed to dramatically increase soybean and corn production, removing massive tracks of pristine forest in their wake.

Link:
http://magazine.viiphoto.com/feature/show/241/

Amazon Ablaze – John Stanmeyer – VII Magazine

The Amazon Rainforest located in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil is ablaze like never before. The surge in burning can be attributed to the extreme rise in commodity prices. As demand for more food grain is needed, farmers are pushed to dramatically increase soybean and corn production, removing massive tracks of pristine forest in their wake.

Link:
http://magazine.viiphoto.com/index.php/feature/show/241