Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – 7 February, 2020

This week on Photojournalism Now: Friday Round Up – the 10th annual Women’s show at Magnet Galleries, Melbourne, plus a review of Dr. Lauren Walsh’s exceptional book, Conversation…

For those of us who work in journalism the myth of the cavalier photojournalist who rushes toward conflict with zeal is well established. Robert Capa’s famous comment about photographers needing to get close to the action in order to capture the best picture is part of industry folklore. Don McCullin has spoken about the adrenalin rush of going to war, likening it to drug addiction. Tim Page’s antics during the Vietnam War have been immortalised in pop culture, Dennis Hopper’s character in the movie Apocalypse Now modelled on the British photographer. Yet while there are those who are lauded as celebrities, the vast majority of conflict photojournalists work in the background, committing themselves to covering some of the world’s darkest moments, to bearing witness to history, largely invisible to the outside world. Glory and money do not motivate them. In fact, these days it is more difficult to make ends meet than ever before. So what drives an individual to the frontline or to document the depths of human misery?

What’s the Point of Conflict Photography?

“I don’t see why I should care about that person.”

At the time, I was teaching a course that concentrated on conflict photography and ethics. At one point during the semester, we were studying the coverage of a famine in Sudan in the early 1990s. My students had to read about the history of that famine and about the political forces that shaped it. They studied the photojournalistic and documentary coverage of this crisis and they read critiques of that work. On the day we were to discuss the coverage of that famine, I put up an image in class; it came from the homework that was assigned to the students. It’s a black-and-white photo taken at a feeding center in Sudan and it portrays a man who is severely emaciated, as thin as you can imagine a person to be. In fact, he is so weak that he cannot stand; he’s crawling on the ground. In this sense, it’s a painful photograph that confronts you with how dire situations of suffering can be.

Lauren Walsh’s Conversations on Conflict Photography

This line of enquiry lies at the heart of Lauren Walsh’s new book, Conversations on Conflict Photography, where conflict is defined as war and crisis, social inequities, natural disasters and humanitarian emergencies. Richly illustrated with 110 colour and B&W photographs, the 376-page book is sectioned into three categories: Behind the Lens, In the Newsroom and Beyond, and Advocacy and Aid. An essay written by Walsh precedes each section followed by a series of interviews.

10 Questions to a Professor : Lauren Walsh - Kaptur

Where do iconic photos fit in a world of Instagram and Snapchat ? We talk with Lauren Walsh from NYU before she takes the stage at the LDV Vision Summit..

photojournalism has been in the eye of the storm. No longer do we view a few amount of carefully curated images selected by well-trained gatekeepers but instead thousands of unfiltered photos spread out throughout our various social media feeds.   How does photojournalism evolve ? What constitute an iconic photograph ? And how are they affecting how we make sense of our world?  Director of the Summer Photojournalism Lab at NYU, Lauren Walsh, brings a few enlightening comments before her upcoming presentation at the LDV Vision Summit