Turning Points: Life-Changing Moments by Magnum Photographers - Photographs and texts courtesy of Magnum Photos | LensCulture

From iconic images of major world events, to intimate moments of pleasure and delight — here is an outstanding selection of remarkable images from Magnum Photos — each with a personal story

'Fighting But No Progress' in Libya's Capital. Inside the Surreal Siege of Tripoli

While the world's attention has been everywhere else, Libya remains in chaos.

Magnum photographer Lorenzo Meloni first went to Libya after the uprising that led to the death of Gaddafi. His latest series of photographs from April and May depicts the exhaustion of fighters who have again been called to the front line. Many on the ground told him of the betrayal they felt after having been backed by U.S. airstrikes as they ousted ISIS from Sirte in 2016, only to be abandoned now. Libya has now become “a small Syria,” Meloni says. “There is fighting but no progress.”

What Happens When War Goes Off Script?

Lorenzo Meloni’s photographs from Iraq and Syria show no traditional markers of a war’s end

As the fight against ISIS winds down, photographer Lorenzo Meloni’s work in Iraq and Syria shows no traditional markers of a war’s end

Inside ISIS' Last Bastion in Libya

“Anything can happen. That’s the most terrifying," says photographer Lorenzo Meloni

“Anything can happen. That’s the most terrifying," says photographer Lorenzo Meloni

Magnum Gets an Injection of New Talent From Six Photographers | American Photo

This year the organization is considering a record number of new Magnum associates to potentially join their ranks: Matt Black, Carolyn Drake, Sohrab Hura, Lorenzo Meloni, Max Pinckers and Newsha Travakolian. To celebrate the history-making occasion Milk Gallery is currently hosting, Magnum Photos: New Blood, an exhibition that highlights the diverse points of view of each of these photographers.

2015 Magnum Nominees : The Future of Photojournalism – The Eye of Photography

From film-inspired Max Pinckers to war reporter Lorenzo Meloni, from Newsha Tavakolian’s insider’s view to the conceptual work of Richard Moose, from the lyrical Carolyn Drake to the classic approach of Matt Black, the six Magnum nominees for 2015 cover the full range of current documentary trends

Magnum Photos Blog

MeloniNew Magnum photographer Lorenzo Meloni returned to the Kurdish Syrian town of Kobane in February and then again in August this year to document the civilian population trying to rebuild their devestated home

Magnum Photos Blog

Michael Christopher Brown has been made an Associate Member Carolyn Drake has been made a Magnum Nominee Matt Black has been made a Magnum Nominee Newsha Tavakolian has been made a Magnum Nominee Max Pinckers has been made a Magnum Nominee Richard Mosse has been made a Magnum Nominee Lorenzo Meloni has been made a Magnum Nominee

Visa pour l’image 2012 : Lorenzo Meloni

These images are part of a project I started called ‘fair, love and war’. It focuses on the young people of my generation living in the suburbs, who use rap music as a status symbol and a way to let off steam but also to find a position in this society.

Lorenzo Meloni – Moonlight Yemen

Lorenzo Meloni Moonlight Yemen Walking around the streets at night gives the feeling of travelling back in time, to a place where time has stopped. The infrastructures here are few and the electric…

Walking around the streets at night gives the feeling of travelling back in time, to a place where time has stopped. The infrastructures here are few and the electricity is scarce – at night it is possible to see the stars on the horizon. Mountains shield from the scorching desert wind and the muezzin’s chants from all the minarets strike you with strength and melancholy, reminding you that you are in a place where religion still dictates ordinary, everyday life.

LightBox | Time

Read the latest stories about LightBox on Time

28-year-old Italian photographer Lorenzo Meloni is fascinated by Yemen and its rapidly-changing existence. Last year, while traveling the country from August to October, Meloni found himself frequently shooting at night, unknowingly documenting the calm of daily life before the tumultuous uncertainty of the Arab Spring.